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Thread: will i die?

  1. #1
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    will i die?

    Im thinking of getting a Yamaha R6. is riding a bike as dangerous as they say? I've had my eye on a bike for about 3 years and now i think i want one. I'm a cautious driver (i like to think)
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  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    If you ride responsibly you should be fine as long as you don't get hit by a car. I have been riding for 4 years now and have never been in a accident. I have had a few very close call, but I was paying attention and was able to avoid an accident. I have a few friends that ride what I would consider wrecklessly, and a few of them have had some pretty bad crashes that were completely their fault(No cars involved)

    Just remember, when you are on a bike, everyone is trying to run you over.
    I tried being reasonable, I didn't like it.

  3. #3
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    Cuda offers great advice, be responsible, ride defensively and wear a helmet.

    I 've been riding for going on 10 years this summer. I have had one wreck, and like cuda said, it was a car trying to run me over. Car made a lane change right into my front tire, it put me down and I slid about 50 ft in full riding gear. I suffered just a bruised hip and the bike (97 Yamaha FZR600R)received road rash.
    No he's not the Tom from M-Space!

  4. #4
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    like they said and ride smart and always look around i have road a 2001 cbr 929 since new and it has never been down just last fall when i put it away i had my sisters scooter and i was only on it 5 min (on a gravel road they dont do that very good) and it was in the ditch. she still does not know about it and i still have to fix it so i better get at it. but what i want to say is if you want to ride 2 wheels, it can be any thing with 2 wheels it can still go down you just have to be smart about it

    there is only 2 kinds of riders

    the ones that have gone down and th ones that will go down

    o ya do not even try to drive on a street that has tar on it (that is an other story)

  5. #5
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    In sand yes,but when you do find sand go over it fast or else down you! Do you have all the gear??B/C you need it the pants,shirt,and the right riding boots..
    GOT ROOST?

  6. #6
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    Well, the leading motorcycle accidents are from people being unaware of their surroundings (not paying attention and a car changes lanes into them, turns in front of them, etc) or from wreckless driving (doing a turn at 80mph and falling).

    The wreckless driving part can easily be avoided - throttle control. If you want to go fast, do a track day.

    The unaware part, just always be on the lookout. Treat every car as a weapon and the driver as the attacker. A bike is MUCH smaller than a car, and many people do not register it when they look at it, which is why so many people turn in front of them and change lanes into them. Always be ready to honk the horn, slam the brake, and even pound on their window to get their attention.

    Also, and this is quite important, watch for people of cell phones! They are horrible - its actually shown that talking on a cell phone while driving is worse than driving drunk.

    My dad has 4 bikes (thats not a typo) and once a week he tells me how somebody nearly took him out. You just have to be on top of things and you will be fine.

    I drive a 330hp car (04 Infiniti G35 6 Speed Manual with Intake, Pulleys, and a few other things) and I hear "thats too fast of a car for someone your age" all the time. However, I don't drive like a maniac, so its fine.

    Having the power is one thing, using it is another.
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  7. #7
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    if u drive safe urself it will reduce ur chances, but over 50% of motorcycle wrecks are someone elses fault.
    motorcycles are harder to c than a car and thus are more likely to get hit at an intersection.
    say u pull up to a 4 way stop and get behind a pole, a car could be seen good and a car coming ur way would see the car and stop, but on a bike they wouldnt c u, so they wouldnt stop and u mite not notice them coming so unless u were EXTREMELY careful u mite pull out in front of them
    Poohbear72

  8. #8
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    I've been riding my whole life. Started on dirt and then went to street.
    Learning to ride on dirt was a great learning experience. It helped in knowing how to ride and recover from something. I've been thru about 10 street bike accidents. totalling 2 bikes. What these guys are saying is right, it's the other guys you have to watch out for.

  9. #9
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    What a great thread title.

    A point some people didnt make(or that i didnt read). Is panic braking, when u hvae to stop and u grab to much front brake and do a nice front flip. My dad did this on a Advanced Saftey course at a local bike gathering(americade, i know someone here has have heard or gone there). he hasnt riden since and totaled the bike(01 Kawasaki Ninja), smashed his middle finger and my mom shattered her ankle.
    Retired RC'r till funds can be found...:(

  10. #10
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    if you are careful and ride normal and obey the traffic laws you will be ok, do what i used to do! i always stayed 2 car lenghts back from the car infront of me and always did the speed limits. watch out for people on CELL phones and the ones that make sudden lane changes! always beaware of your surroundings (not paying attention) to the road or other cars. never show off or try to race or something stupid like that"

    Never try to beat the yellow light always slow get ready to stop, i never tryed to beat the yellow light when i had my bike.
    Take Responsibility do not text and drive.

  11. #11
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    You have a much higher chance on a bike, then in a car but you still can die in a car for me it isn't worth upping that chance.
    Stampede VXL upgraded broken stuff.

  12. #12
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    All the above is good advise, I would suggest to try and make eye contact with the cars at intersections, weeve a little in your lane so they can see somethings comming, and always be aware of the cars color and know where there at at all times..Knock on wood, Ive rode about any kind of bike built in the past, now I ride harleys and there slower and heavier and with that you need more distance and time to respond, A sport bike can be flicked around a bit easier..My first ve-hicle was a rode bike , and Ive been riden for 21 years and love it Both dirt and street,and have been luckey so far, just be safe be careful and good luck...

  13. #13
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    Cycling will always carry more inherent risk than driving a car. Whenever a car and a motorcycle get in a tangle, the car will ALWAYS win. For me, there are two reasons why cyclists get into accidents.

    1: "Cagers" do not see motorcyclists - heck, sometime I think my CAR is invisible to other motorists.....

    2: Some motorcycle riders drive in a "squid like" mannner - darting through traffic and changing directions erratically. (hence the nickname "squid") So even if a "cager" looks to see if a lane change or merge is safe, the squid is in the formerly empty space because he is moving much faster than prevailing traffic.

    If this is your first bike, I'd suggest something a little more tame than a R6. I am getting back into cycling, and I am probably going to buy a Kawasaki EX250 (little ninja) to ride for the first year or so. They are highly rated beginner sport bikes that can go 0-60 in less than six seconds. (sure, that's slow compared to the R6 - but faster than most any car on the road) Since they are popular starter bikes, I can sell it and lose very little money when I decide to buy something larger. (probably a cruiser)

    Back when I used to ride my Honda CB175, I had little trouble with other drivers and no "really close calls". I think this is because I drove with the flow of traffic, and my actions on the road were predictable.

    I am also taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation basic riders course even though I've logged over 20K miles of safe cycling.

    Be safe and don't be a squid!
    Speed costs money, how fast do you want to go?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by arceeguy
    I am also taking the Motorcycle Safety Foundation basic riders course even though I've logged over 20K miles of safe cycling.
    I took a Motorcycle safety class, best money ever spent. It include basic in class learning and 3 5 hour days of road course riding on honda rebels. Well worth the money spent and I get an insurance discount.
    I tried being reasonable, I didn't like it.

  15. #15
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    bikes are really not to bad(on the street not sure)

    as long as you where you helmet,gloves,jacket,ankel or taller boots(leather),and NEVER where shorts,if you were to fall you would not get hurt to bad(unless a car runs over you J/K)

    watch out for idiot drivers and the drivers on the phone

    drive carefully and watch out

  16. #16
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    though it is true you will reduce your chances of getting hurt by watching other drivers, you can never watch everybody at one time. my uncle used to drive a motorcycle but had to give it up because people are simply stupid when it comes to driving.
    I know a guy that was killed on a bike. he came around a corner and passed a car on the side of the road, but never saw the truck coming at him. he was wearing a helmet but it was no match to the truck in his face. I saw a pic of the bike after, and the only thing I could make out was the muffler sticking up.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowfatbaconwrap
    Im thinking of getting a Yamaha R6. is riding a bike as dangerous as they say?
    if your asking this question, then you shouldnt even be thinking about buying a powerfull, bike start of on something slow, get the feel of bikes, do courses and training.......seriously if you are asking this question, im taking it you have no knowledge of riding bikes from it and you want to go straight onto an R6.....buy something with less power first and learn to ride on that......thats why in the uk, at 16 you can ride a 50cc scooter by passing a bike test...then at 18 you can go up to 125cc, then 21 you can go as high as you like, its stop young kids, and people with no experience of bikes, buying a bike they cant handle and coming off.....and lets face it at 17-18yrs old when you past your test regardless who you are, you drive fast in your car which has no power.......kids want to go fast in cars, give them a bike that can beat alot of high powered cars, its going to end in tears....not my tears, and not tears of joy......get something smaller to learn on first

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowfatbaconwrap
    Im thinking of getting a Yamaha R6. is riding a bike as dangerous as they say? I've had my eye on a bike for about 3 years and now i think i want one. I'm a cautious driver (i like to think)
    [COLOR="Navy"]My brother in law is a state Trooper 6 yrs on the job.What does this have to do with the ? well he had a Rocket (ninja)Not sure of the make (not a bike rider)but He saw his 1st accident with a bike.And promply sold it.Now like it was said if you drive it safely you will be fine but if you have any doubt in doing it then maybe you might want to think it a little more.being in Health care if have seen a lot that should not have happened.(This has nothing to do with this thread,but they passed a helmet choice but they force people to buckle up in the car?Does this make sence.of course I am in favor of that too!! JMO [/COLOR]

  19. #19
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    Thanks for all your input. Does riding the bike outweigh the dangers that it comes with? Is it that much fun? I have a blast on my sea-doo and my new quad. I take off work to ride. I think ill just get one.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pitslayer666[]
    if your asking this question, then you shouldnt even be thinking about buying a powerfull, bike start of on something slow, get the feel of bikes, do courses and training.......seriously if you are asking this question, im taking it you have no knowledge of riding bikes from it and you want to go straight onto an R6.....buy something with less power first and learn to ride on that......(snip)
    +100 on that. Would you learn how to fly a plane in an F16? +100 on the "start on dirt" comment too. As a dirt biker, you learn to handle your bike while out of control as a matter of basic reality. And the penalties aren't nearly as bad (usually). If you start on the street, the first time you're really out of control... well, it's usually a really bad thing.
    ....and for all these reasons, I have decided to scalp you - and burn your village to the ground. - Wednesday Addams -

  21. #21
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    yes riding a bike is fun, when you dont know how to handle a bike with that much power and you come off and end up with road rash, or missing limbs or even worse god forbid dead......learn on something with less power first, do not go out and buy an R6, because you can, a sea doo and qaud is nothing like a bike, learn on something smaller, first, you have no experience on riding a bike, let alone an R6, dont take offence(take a gate its lighter ) but if your going out and buying an R6, with no experience of bike riding, more fool you.....please think about it, bikes are cool no doubt about it.....but people who dont know how to ride bikes arent cool, and people who show off by buying a big fast bike as there first bike and have no experience with....i have no time for......
    scenario....you buy the R6, you get on it, youve got no experience.....your taking it home, your getting confident, over confident, you have no experience.....you loose control, someone pulls out infront of you, someone walks out in front off you.....and you cant control the bike or know what to do, to recover it because you have no experience and come off....and we all know that when you come of bike, regardless if you ride or not....it hurts and you know that your going down for a while......30mph in a car, into a nother car, you`ll be shaken up a bit, maybe a bit of whiplash....30mph on a bike into a car, your off the bike, sliding down the road, flying into traffic, going through the back window of the car you hit....hit stationary objects

    think about it, seriously

  22. #22
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    I realize we're not telling you what you wanna hear. But here's another idea for you: bikes like the R6 are meant to be ridden aggressively - that's where they do best and are safest too. Starting out on an underpowered bike will naturally make you an aggressive rider - because you'll need to ride like that to go fast. Then later you take those skills to the R6 and you'll rule. As it is now, that R6 will ride you. this applies to dirt bikes too IMO.
    ....and for all these reasons, I have decided to scalp you - and burn your village to the ground. - Wednesday Addams -

  23. #23
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. BobR's Avatar
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    Getting an R6 as a first bike is an absolutely fantastic way to wind up as a red mark on the asphalt. There are better entry points... a Kawasaki Ninja 250 and a motorcycle safety course certainly aren't exciting, but it's really one of the best choices.
    Six in a row makes it go.

  24. #24
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    5 points to BobR for putting it bluntly, what most people are trying to say i agree totally with you bob, lowfatbaconwrap, if you wanna end up like a red skidmark across the freeway go for an R6,

  25. #25
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    I would say the biggest thing is what is the traffic conditions where you live. Cause if you live here in FT Lauderdale I would say stay off of 2 wheels, I would say get a tank, it's safer.

    I had been driving motorcycles since I was a 14 yr old kid. I had a motorcycle when I was in the Navy and stationed in areas where there were lots of country roads and open highways. When I moved back to Ft Lauderdale I sold my bike.

    A 6R is a big bike to be your first street bike. I would stay around 400CC range at first, no larger.

    +200 of motorcycle safety coarses.

    Just remember, it doesn't matter who's fault it is when it is you in the hospital with pins in your legs or arms. You have no protectection like you do in a car or truck....
    All Lives Matter
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitronaught
    ...... I would stay around 400CC range at first, no larger.....
    Unfortunately, there are very few choices for street bikes below 500cc. So if he's looking for a new bike, a 250 will probably have to do. (although that may not be a bad thing)

    For old guys like us, a 80-175cc bike is considered a small bike. 250-400cc bikes is mid sized, and 500+ cc's is large. Today, 250's are small, 600's are mid-sized and 1 liter + bikes are large. There are only a handful of 250cc street bikes available in America (plenty of small bikes in other countries) because of the "bigger is better" mentality. Why any experienced rider would want more power than a 600cc sport bike is beyond me. (even on the track) I test drove a Ninja 250 this afternoon, and even for a li'l 250 it pulls nicely once the engine hits its powerband. This makes the bike quite docile and easy to handle at lower revs, but it will get up and go when you drop it down a few gears and twist the throttle! The EX250 is the one I am going to get for sure. The other 250's like the Honda Rebel and the Yamaha Virago 250 don't have the power that the Ninja has. (the ninja is water cooled, 4 valves per cylinder the others are air cooled 2 valve designs)

    Seriously - take the MSF course, get a Ninja 250 and trade up after you've put a season or two under your belt.

    Quote Originally Posted by BP-Revo
    I drive a 330hp car (04 Infiniti G35 6 Speed Manual with Intake, Pulleys, and a few other things) and I hear "thats too fast of a car for someone your age" all the time. However, I don't drive like a maniac, so its fine.
    Starting off with a powerful car vs. a powerful bike are two different things.
    Driving a car requires very little skill. Whereas riding a motorcycle requires skill (balance and fine throttle control) and constant attention. (a small patch of sand or gravel on a curve that is insignificant for a car driver can mean a wipeout for a cyclist if it isn't avoided)
    Speed costs money, how fast do you want to go?

  27. #27
    Traxxas Employee captainharlock's Avatar
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    The answer to your question is yes. You will die sooner or later, regardless of an accident, age or health. Will you die on a motorbike? Perhaps but not necessary.
    Life is primarily a matter of chance. The odds of success are in no way enhanced by extreme caution.
    Terminal is not the end, only the beginning...

  28. #28
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    +100 on the Safety Course...before you even buy a bike...I took the course and it was an eye opener to the way people drive around you. It makes you much more aware of your surroundings. It wa a shock to view traffic differently after the course. My forst bike was a new Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic...awesome bike...sold it 2 years later after the wife got pregnant.

    If you're going to get the R6, buy one of those SUMO suits...you'll need the padding when you hit the pavement. I saw a guy that rode for years take his brand-new (days old) Hiyabusa and wedge it under a weeks-old Toyota Camry...totaling both. He's fine, but of course he was riding it like a donkey.

    Point is, it doens't matter what you start with, if you ride like a donkey, your hip will be a permanent part of the highway system. Keep your eyes open, pay attention, ride S-L-O-W-L-Y until you are 100% comfortable on the bike.

    Oh yeah, sand? Don't go fast through sand...stay straight and don't brake with your front...apply rear only brakes LIGHTLY, or you'll be looking at the world with the horizon going vertical...and a lot of expensive plastic (and you for that matter) with road rash...

    Gear...get a GOOD leather jacket, helmet, boots, GLOVES, and riding pants...jeans wear down very fast at 15 mph as you're sliding along on your rumpus, don't even think about what would happen doing 60...

    Are they fun though? You betcha rumpus they are...the wind, the smells (as long as you're not on a highway) the sounds, everything is better...I finally knew what my dog was doing when he'd stick his head out the window of the car...so exhilerating, so exciting, so comforting...I miss it terribly...

    Just keep your mouth closed if you get an open faced helmet...either that, or buy a bike with a windshield...bugs don't taste good...
    If Mr. Rogers doesn't say it...don't type it.

  29. #29
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    Perhaps it is better to judge a good starter bike by horsepower rather than engine size.

    Back in the day I would have said a good 650 size bike to start on, and I still say the same.

    That being said I don't think that a new(er) 600cc sportbike is a great choice. The problem isn't that you don't intend to ride to the full potential of the bike on the street (so why buy it in the first place), but that this bike is WAY more capable than your skills will be ready for. 100+ horsepower for a first motorcycle is just a bad idea.

    A comfortable power level may be something like 60 horsepower. Still plenty of power to get you in huge trouble, but not as likely to overpower you. Something like the Suzuki SV650, GS500E (if they still make it), or Kawasaki 650 Ninja (if you're into the full bodywork thing). Some will say these are too much to learn on, but I think they are powerful enough to be entertaining for more than one season, at least 2 of them have great aftermarket support, and they are real full size bikes if you are a good size person.

    That being said, the question is will you like to ride. The only way to find out is to get a bike and do it. Taking a ride on your buddy's bike is not the same as doing it every day. For this reason, among others, I suggest buying something relatively inexpensive. New is not the way to go for a first bike. If you decide you don't enjoy it all that much you will want to sell your bike. The huge depreciation you will get on the average sportbike is going to hurt the old wallet. If you buy something cheap in the first place you can probably sell it for what you bought it for.

    These threads are everywhere, on this forum and others. Search a little and make a decision.

    Be safe.

  30. #30
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    I have been riding for several years now, and I have yet, (and I pray I never do), lay a bike down. Just be responsable with the power. I hate to see these kids on their street bikes riding wheelies down the middle of a major street. Keep your eyes on the road, scan ahead, and keep your head where it needs to be.
    My truck sees more air than yours!!!

  31. #31
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    In a congested area like where I live, You wouldn't catch me on a motorcycle on the street. Just too many idiots and a bike has no protection other than what you are wearing.

    In the country and less congested areas, they are a blast. I miss my motorcycle, but prefer life. I see at least 1 car accident every day on the way to work or on the way home.
    I mean I see one, as it happens. I'm not counting the ones that happened and are on the side of the road after the fact, or in the news or radio.
    All Lives Matter
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  32. #32
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    I hear ya NN, Im in Tampa and so many Bikers get splattered on the street its not even funny. I grew up in North Ga in the foothills of the Appalachian Mts and the only times someone was splattered was when they are careless. Even in FL if you are a pedestrian going at .5 mph you are prolly going to get hit, on a bike its even worse. Also add in bars and poker runs... Ive seen too many friends hurt and killed. I am not against biking in any ways. I have a 1970 BMW R75/5 and am looking for a newer cruiser, but I really hate riding down here. I usually trailer my bike until I get to a more remote spot and go from there.
    ♫Laissez les bon temps rouler!♫

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowfatbaconwrap
    Im thinking of getting a Yamaha R6. is riding a bike as dangerous as they say? I've had my eye on a bike for about 3 years and now i think i want one. I'm a cautious driver (i like to think)

    PROLLY WILL!!!!
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  34. #34
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    I drove by an accident last night. There were no bikes involved but a guy on the ground screaming in pain. I didnt get out to invesigate further, i just drove on by. The paramedics were there to help him. But it got me to thinking. That guy could have easily died. I have always had the stragest feeling that id prolly get really hurt on a bike. Thats whats been stopping me from buying one these past 3 years. I've worked for a lot. I built my own business from scratch, i have 2 houses, great friends and family, and im 22 years old. I could lose all of that. No doubt that i could easily die inside a car, but I think ill stick with my quads and jet skis for now. Besides, think of how hard it would be to drive a revo with a broken arm!!!
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