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  1. #1
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    RC Related Career Ideas

    Hey guys, I figured this is a good place to post this question about RC related career idea's and options. I live in Utah and have been working as an Employment Specialist/Social worker assisting people with dissabilities and brain injuries find and maintain employment for the last few years. Its a decent career field and nice to help people but it does not pay enough to support my family these days.

    I just found out my wife is pregnant so I need to look into another career field where I can make enough to support us and at least have and maintain the basics (own a home, cars, med expenses, RC, misc expenses) and not have to worry about money so much.

    I have a HS diploma but do not have a college degree because I had a child at 18 and was forced to work two jobs from then on to make things work. I have a lot of specialist training and certifications but most of that will be semi useless applied to another career field.

    I have tried to think of things I both enjoy (loving your job is as important as anything else), have a good understanding of (making it easier to learn more about it) and that I would be able to support a family doing. I have come up with a few idea's but at the top of my list is RC related careers.

    I have been into RC for nearly 20 years and with the new technology used in RC I have learned a lot about electronics/batteries/mechanics ect ect. I'm trying to think of a way to apply this knowlage to a career field and possibly be able to make RC my full time career (or something very similar). I feel its what I'm best at, most willing to study/learn about and I flat out have a major passion for it. To me it seems these are the perfect reasons to make something your career.

    Anyone with idea's on career fields that require these skills (besides auto mechanics) would be greatly appreciated. I know of a few but most require degree's which is also a possibility but I would like to see what people throw out there before I go signing up for college at 26 with a baby on the way and having to continue to work full time as well (RC would likely dissapear for me then- no time). Thanks everyone I appreciate the input and ideas!
    That's Just How I Roll o==o>

  2. #2
    Traxxas Employee Nitro Chicken's Avatar
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    Quite frankly college is the best idea. You may suffer for 4 or 5 years but in the end the hard work will be well worth it. Joining an RC company as an engineer beats the heck out of any other way and pays a lot better too. You would be hard pressed to support a family with a new baby as an entry level phone tech, lab tech or warehouse worker.
    Hobbies and other elective leisure activities that cost money and time are the things that get shelved until you can dig back out.
    The real question is, do you stick with your current job and marketable skill set or do you say that is not the future you want and redirect now while you are young? Most importantly what does your wife think about it? If she is supportive and willing to sacrifice for the change then there is nothing stopping you. Even if you do not land an RC career at the end of university, mechanical engineering is a very marketable degree.

    Just a little chicken food for thought!
    "Fortunately son, I says fortunately I keep my feathers numbered for just such an emergency!"
    Foghorn Leghorn

  3. #3
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    go to your local chamber of commerce see if they know some one that wants to invest in a hobbie shop, you should be qualified to run it, may have to move.

  4. #4
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    Thanks Nitro Chicken- that's one of the options I am considering right now as I would LOVE to learn more about engineering and I can actually say its a dream of mine to work for a manufacturer working on the design end of RC's. The main thing holding me back from college besides money is the fact that I would not only have to sacrifice RC for a while but more important to me I would miss out on a lot of my new baby's life working 40-50hrs a week + 20-30 hours of school and whatever work is needed at home. That being said going to school is a heavy decision for me to make right now...

    As far as a Hobby Shop- you nailed another dream of mine on the head there (Track+Hobby shop). My local shop just closed 2 weeks ago and had very consistant business so I have thought about that a lot I mean a lot lately. I just do not have the means to finance a business right now and would need someone a little more business savvy to help with that end of running a store. I have managed a restraunt before so I understand some of what it takes to run a business and I know RC pretty good, if it wasn't for the initial finances needed to open a shop I would probably give it a little more thought. Maybe Ill check into the chamber of commerce, that's a great idea thanks.
    Last edited by FreakyT333; 05-06-2010 at 04:41 PM.
    That's Just How I Roll o==o>

  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Nitronaught's Avatar
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    It's not as much what skills you have as it is what will get you in the door. Imagine posting an ad for a job position for 2 days and receiving over 1000 resumes.

    Basically your application and resume gets lost in a sea of others. And now with the economy the way it is, it's not any easier.

    Having that college degree is a huge factor. I don't know of any hobby shop employee who is earning that much. Most are working more than just in the hobby shop or are living with Mom and Dad. N.C. is 100% right.

    Now I know that you have good RC experience, you may have excellent electronics skills and troubleshooting skills. But that is not what is going to get you noticed.

    I've had to go through resumes and interview techs in the past. Did the best ones get picked? I couldn't tell you. A pile of 500 resumes first thing I do is look at spelling and punctuation as well as how well the resume is written, that weeds out about 60% of them right there. So when you do your resume have it proof read by someone else and make sure you have good punctuation.

    As far as what kind of RC related jobs are out there. That's kinda tough cause RC's are a combined set of skills but does not exactly put you into a high paying or well paying job.

    I wish you well, but with all these "Tech" schools that are out there pumping out kids with their "Quickly Obtained" degrees that mean next to nothing, it just makes getting that interview that much harder.

    At this time I suggest going to the unemployment office, they often have resources for matching your skills to jobs. If you have management skills and want to run a hobby store, I suggest you pound the pavement with that nice resume and dressed to kill. First impressions are huge.

    Of coarse the other alternative is to do a job that nobody likes to do (Dirty Jobs), they usually pay better than many jobs.

    I wish you the best of luck, hope that you can find something to support your family that you also enjoy doing. Me, I'm working at a place I can't stand, high levels of stress. But it pays the bills and right now the job market just plane stinks.

    If you figure out what line of work you want to get involved in, don't just apply online, pound the pavement and show up personally. It's tough work but it may help get your foot in the door. Good luck, and I wish you all the best.
    All Lives Matter
    United We Stand, Divided We Fall

  6. #6
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    Thanks for your input Nitronaught much appreciated. My current career field is employment so I'm quite familiar with the tricks to acquiring a job and agree in today's market its not easy at all. I'm more on the lookout for the right type of career where I can use the skills I apply to this hobby to make a living. I'm just not happy doing what I do and the present and future pay scale in my current field is just not going to cut it for me supporting a small family. I'm hoping someone might throw something out there I haven't already considered or thought of as far as types of careers requiring these types of skills. Engineering seems to be the most promising but the schooling required is a real setback for me in my current situation.
    That's Just How I Roll o==o>

  7. #7
    RC Champion
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    as nn and nc said, no matter what, GET A DEGREE!
    Master of Traxxas engine longevity....

  8. #8
    RC Racer
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    what about starting out with drafting. Take a few classes at your local college to earn a certification in drafting and design. My local college offers classes to earn a certification that takes about a year. This may help you get your foot in the door. And most if not all the classes required for the certification are required for drafting/design degrees as well as engineering degrees so its a start if you do decide to pursue a degree in engineering. And once you get hired on as a drafter, depending on the company, they may step in and pay for your schooling to get a degree.

    Looking for a career working for an RC manufacture may not be the best route. There just isn't that many companies which means a smaller chance of a position opening up. Looking for a job that is similar would have a better chance of getting hired.

    When in high school I took a drafting course at a vocational school. My senior year I was hired part time as a drafter for a mechanical engineering firm. For the year that I worked for the company I worked out of the office, on site at a job doing work for ADM Cocoa who was building a new factory from the ground up (we won the bid for the project). I showed a interest in the automation side and they noticed my interest and offered me a full time position as an automation technician plus paid schooling so I can get my associates in automated manufacturing. So at the moment not only am I getting on the job training (which I find much more informing than schooling) but Im also taking classes during the evening.

    I can relate my field to rc in a few ways. Its a mix of mechanical and electrical engineering. So far I've taken courses in everything from PLC's, pneumatics, robotics and electrical. Its a neat field and from what I've been told, its a growing field and they expect the number of open positions to be greater than the amount of people looking to fill the position. In other words, the demand will be greater than the supply.

  9. #9
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    Thanks drummin, that is another very good and much more doable option for me in my current situation. I hadn't thought much about drafting but thinking a little more now that you mentioned it there is a lot of transferrable knowledge between engineering and drafting.

    The only downfall is that entry level drafting positions are far and few between here in my area. I recently had a client I was assisting in finding a job, she had just completed tech school receiving a drafting certification. I searched far and wide within a 50 mile radius of where we live for entry level drafting positions. I assisted her in applying for a few positions but even with following up and cutting through the gatekeepers to speak directly with the managers in charge of hiring for the positions, we were unsuccessful in getting her a job. I'm not saying its impossible but we didn't have much luck with that field (entry level anyways) here in my area.

    I will look into it a little more since we have some very reputable tech schools here in Utah and see if there are more job opportunities in that field now. The area's of study you mentioned sound very interresting and something that I would enjoy. Thanks a ton for the input.

    So far I am very happy with the input and ideas I have gathered from this thread, they are really helping me look into this more seriously and with a good heading. Thanks guys and please keep them coming...
    That's Just How I Roll o==o>

  10. #10
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    You know I was doing this a couple years ago. I'm 27 and have a 4yr old and a 17mo now. Currently my occupation is a gokart mechanic, I gotta say I love my job but it's not going to cut it. Been living paycheck to paycheck for sometime now. I work partially full time and my wife works part time.
    I went to vocational school when I was 17 for foresty, fighting forest fires, park ranger duties, etc. Never picked up that degree. 19-22 I was unemployed, jailbird, volunteering at my local fire dept hoping they'd pick me up on payroll. Agian, didn't happen. Enough of me.
    Have you looked into welding? I'm going to be taking classes this fall. After 6 mo of schooling I can apply for entry level positions or as an apprentance. LOL
    After getting the info paket I went to talk to the instructor and get a feel for the place. We got talking and it came around to money in the field
    You can start in ca as a entry level welder at 17.50 and up. I was told at minimum would be 10 bucks an hour (a dollar under what I get now) but it would change faster then you can lay down a log with the porcelan god.

    Just thought I'd get that out there...
    Traxxas should just cash my checks for me

  11. #11
    RC Qualifier
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    Update

    Hey I just wanted to bump this thread up and let all of you who gave input and advice on this matter know that I have enrolled in school.
    After looking into many options I finally decided to enroll into a Mechatronics Engineering program here at my local technical college. I applied for and was awarded a government Pell Grant so this whole thing quickly became a reality for me. I am very excited to go through this course- I mean I basically get to learn how to build, maintain and design robotic systems.... How cool is that! The lab at my school is great, its like a giant play room for me : ) . Depending on whether anyone is interested or not I can post updates on here about what I am learning and playing with throughout the course.
    I want to thank you guys for giving me great ideas and advice on figuring out the best career path for my skills and interests. I can honestly say that if it wasn't for r/c I probably wouldn't have thought to go in this direction for a career change. We will see how it all works out in the end but so far the job opportunities in this field promise to be lucrative, interesting and are in high demand in my area.
    I may come here later on asking for ideas on a cool r/c related final project, I already have some cool ideas but will have to wait and see what I will be required to do.
    That's Just How I Roll o==o>

  12. #12
    RC Qualifier
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    i would love to hear updates, im glad you found the right path
    merv and erbe

  13. #13
    RC Racer
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    My $0.02 .. you've already heard over and over, get a degree - and this is the truth. The flip side of this is that there are a million people with degrees and no experience. The degree opens the door for you. The experience helps land (and more importantly, keep) the job. That said .. the starting pay for a 'new' mechanical engineer far outweighs the starting pay for the same person without a degree.

    A few things I've learned thus far in my life .. while your hobby is fun, it most likely will not pay the bills. Additionally, when your hobby becomes something you have to depend on, the lines between work and play become blurred. This can cause burn out - to the point that you could potentially hate your hobby.

    A saying I love - You can work hard now and play hard later .. or play hard now and work hard later. The choice is yours.

  14. #14
    RC Qualifier USMC1984's Avatar
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    Pffft! Degree schmagree!

    Go get a CDL, drive locally.

    If you have oilfield work in the area, get your tanker and hazmat (Get those anyway).

    Hauling crude oil can easily get you 80-120k/year! ...and you stay local, home every night and you reset at home instead of a truck stop.

    CDL school is around 30 days and then you're working...many companies offer hire on bonuses.



    FWIW, everyone working at Starbucks has a degree...everyone working at any art supply store has a degree...
    Last edited by USMC1984; 02-28-2020 at 02:08 PM.

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