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  1. #1
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    Beginning Flight Questions

    After rain, storms, hail, tornadoes, and high wind I finally got some outside flight time and have a question. I am trying to hover about six feet above the ground. I can adjust the throttle to where it is pretty stable than after about 10 seconds it starts ascending. If I decrease the power it will resume a stable altitude than suddenly start to descend. (This in the beginner mode). The wind is pretty calm. Am I doing something wrong or is this normal?

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Dadx2mj's Avatar
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    I cant explain why they wonder like that but I would say it is normal, at least to my experience. The only Quads I have seen that will hold a steady hover for a long period of time have GPS capabilities to hold them in a fixed position.
    BlindMan Racing
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  3. #3
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    That is entirely normal for any of these types of quads until one gets into advanced flight controllers on more expensive multi-rotors.

    Enjoy your Alias. They are great flyers. Try to kill your throttle if a crash seem imminent, actually try not to crash or have those less than effective quad-solid immovable objects interactions with which quads seem so attracted, and try not to power stall the motors. Your motors will thank with increased longevity. The truth is crashes are part of the early stages of one's learning curve.

    Good luck.

    JB

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by K9WG View Post
    After rain, storms, hail, tornadoes, and high wind I finally got some outside flight time and have a question. I am trying to hover about six feet above the ground. I can adjust the throttle to where it is pretty stable than after about 10 seconds it starts ascending. If I decrease the power it will resume a stable altitude than suddenly start to descend. (This in the beginner mode). The wind is pretty calm. Am I doing something wrong or is this normal?
    It sounds normal to me. A "pretty" calm wind condition is not dead still, something that's probably more theoretical than actual, if ever. There are also temperature and humidity gradients to consider, which will change the density of the air. I also doubt the rotors stay at an exact RPM for more than a few seconds.

    I daresay constant adjustment is the name of the game, and with practice, you'll become proficient at making smaller and smaller ones to maintain a stable hover.

  5. #5
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    Winder-388thVFW

    Thanks, I thought maybe changes in air movement and air temperature might be the reason. I am getting better however I still have a long way to go.

    Rich

  6. #6
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    I found I have to overcontrol the throttle and then correct. Seems to work better than just an ultra fine touch.

  7. #7
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    I think the fancy term is "systematic approximations", as one fine tunes their fine motor control. Jeremy1 I tend to overshoot the throttle slightly myself, but any wind gradients definitely makes for a delicate touch on the stick. I got the throttle down pretty well- it's the yaw control where I tend to "over-correct". Pitch/roll I got my right thumb and finger pretty well trained.

    These little units are pretty responsive and sensitive. Their power-weight ratio definitely is a factor in that.

  8. #8
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    Actually, now that you mention it, I too have problems with rudder control. But only in that I can't seem to work the rudder without it affecting throttle setting. Outdoors and high I hardly notice it. But indoors when rudder control movement affects throttle it yo-yo's excessively. I've been able to improve, but not fix it.

  9. #9
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    Jeremy- Indoors depending on the room size and height off the floor and distance from ceiling and walls- all these factors may come into play affecting quad performance. Those props and the relative motor power will definitely stir up air circulation in a room affecting performance.

  10. #10
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    What you say is true, but my issue is clearly crosstalk between the two control axes on the same stick. I can't quickly move the stick left/right without introducing some up/down error.

  11. #11
    Traxxas Employee TireSlinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy1 View Post
    What you say is true, but my issue is clearly crosstalk between the two control axes on the same stick. I can't quickly move the stick left/right without introducing some up/down error.
    I've been flying aircraft of all types for almost 15 years and this sort of thing takes lots of practice to master. You're basically creating muscle memory for super fine motor skills, to the point where you don't even have to think about it before reacting. Large control inputs are easy, but the art of really mastering flying requires the hair-fine movements to be second nature too.

    Just fly and enjoy your quad, focus on trying to be as smooth as possible but don't stress about it either. As you continue to have fun and fly more you'll naturally get better and better.

  12. #12
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Dadx2mj's Avatar
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    I have to agree with TireSlinger. I see the same thing a lot, when I give it rudder commands I usually get some unwanted throttle adjustment as well. I dont think it is the radio and "cross talking" I think it is my thumb being some what clumsy. I say this because it does not always happen just most of the time. If I really think about not trying to change throttle while giving it rudder I can sometimes make it happen. I have also noticed as I fly the Alias more the problem seems to be happening to a lesser degree.
    BlindMan Racing
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  13. #13
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    Lots of pre-flight coffee does not necessarily help my fine motor movements either

  14. #14
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    No, you guys might have misunderstood. I'm not blaming the radio. It's clearly a finger thing.

  15. #15
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    I understood what you intended. Muscle neuron to-from brain bio-feedback crosstalk stuff. Practice effect will help with the fine tuning of the fine motor control coordination in theory.

  16. #16
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    I fly with the Thumb pads (thumbs only) I think a lot of us do. But to have a more precise control you might want to opp to the sticks a squeeze or pinch the control sticks with you index finger and thumb. This will also prepare you once you move into the bigger models with the conventional radio design. Funny that's how I've flown all my RC's my whole life but not my Alias...

  17. #17
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    I have always been a pincher guy. If a transmitter has had those thumb pads I have to modify them to sticks in order to feel comfortable and have decent control. It's what I am used to using.

  18. #18
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    I agree fully with the concept of 'fine muscle control.'

    For a few takeoffs a month ago, one or more of the rotors did not spin up as I expected. I thought "Oh crap, a motor is about to die." It turns out I was not advancing the throttle straight up.

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