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  1. #321
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    Uhm, Videos, or it didn't happen!!!

  2. #322
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingTigerDad View Post
    Either truck would be a good choice. The SC10 is probably more capable out of the box, but with a little effort Slash can be made into a fine carpet track racer.
    FYI, the new ProSC10 is basically a 5th gen Associated SC5M rear motor with plastic chassis. The old SC10 is based off of the B4, and not very good IMO. The new one is light years ahead of the old one, IMO, not the least being that it's metric.
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  3. #323
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    FYI, the new ProSC10 is basically a 5th gen Associated SC5M rear motor with plastic chassis. The old SC10 is based off of the B4, and not very good IMO. The new one is light years ahead of the old one, IMO, not the least being that it's metric.
    I'd have to agree with you - if it were me, I would go that way. The use of metric hardware is huge - a deal breaker if they didn't make the switch with this truck. Also caught your review of the truck itself, and like so much of their new stuff, it appears that they've made big improvements in quality & content.
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  4. #324
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    If I didn't have so much money into my slash, I would turn it into a monster truck and buy the associated Pro SC10

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  5. #325
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    Question for you Rustler Racers: how important is an aluminum bulkhead on a racing rustler? What differences would you notice if one vehicle had an rpm bulkhead/aluminum shock tower versus aluminum bulkhead/aluminum shock tower?

    I haven't made it through the entire thread yet, congratulations on your build as well as contributing knowledge to the community!
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  6. #326
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    You'd notice more weight in the front end of the car, which would tend to have more steering overall. Personally I don't think the Rustler needs any more steering, and I think it's better to move weight around (battery, ESC, etc.) rather than add weight. The truck is already really heavy.
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  7. #327
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synnergy View Post
    Question for you Rustler Racers: how important is an aluminum bulkhead on a racing rustler? What differences would you notice if one vehicle had an rpm bulkhead/aluminum shock tower versus aluminum bulkhead/aluminum shock tower?

    I haven't made it through the entire thread yet, congratulations on your build as well as contributing knowledge to the community!
    Thanks Synnergy. To answer your question... An aluminum bulkhead is not necessary, the factory unit is fine. I use an aluminum one on my truck simply because it will last a little longer than plastic before developing excessive play and getting sloppy. Eventually they all will with use, though. I haven't used the RPM one, but if it's like their other plastic, it will be too flexible to be really useful as a bulkhead part.

    Aluminum shock towers are also generally not good for most off road applications, as they tend to bend too easily - carbon fiber, or fiberglass would be the preferred material there.

    As for weight distribution and adding weight to the front end, I have to agree with Razor - these trucks are heavy enough as is without looking to add more weight - you'll get much better results by shifting the weight of things you can't get rid of (i.e., battery, ESC, etc.) to a better, or more forward location. Rustlers do have plenty of steering available with the right tires and roll center settings, so adding weight shouldn't really be needed.
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  8. #328
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    I just wanted to give a quick update to a couple of little things I did to the truck before I hit the carpet track this weekend. When I ordered my replacement rear tires, I picked up a few small pieces that I really liked, and wanted to share them with you. Before I get into those, I want to take a minute to talk about the carpet tires that I've been using. Way back in July of last year when I set up the truck to run on the carpet, I picked up some JConcepts carpet tires - Swaggers for the front & Pin Downs for the rear, in their pink compound. I've run these for the last 8 months (averaging 2 track days a month) and just now had to replace the rear. These tires have been absolutely great for grip and excellent for wear - worth every penny for the value I've gotten out of them. One other advantage I've noticed versus other brand carpet tires for trucks (Stadium trucks, or SCT's) is that they are a lower profile and overall smaller outer diameter, giving the truck an edge in lowering the ride height, and subsequently, the center of gravity. So, for anyone looking to run on a carpet track, I highly recommend these tires.

    O.K., so now for the other pieces... The end links for the Pro-Line front sway bar(that attach the bar to the arm) came with just a small straight threaded rod - making you have to remove a link end to make any type of adjustment. It was the same with the Dynamite front sway bar I got for my son's Slash. As I put his together, I found some old small titanium turnbuckle style links (Tecnacraft, I believe, if anyone remembers them) from my old Losi race trucks and used those on his truck. I also found a little longer one that I used for his servo to steering rack link. Those worked out very well on his truck & I really liked them a lot. I knew I would have to do the same for mine, but those were the only old spares that I had left. So I did some searching and found some tiny 3x16mm turnbuckles from Associated - part# 8811, that fit the bill perfectly. Here's how they look on the truck....


    With that done, I still wanted one for the steering servo linkage. I remembered that in one Razor's Slash build posts he found an appropriate sized link for that from Schumacher. I found that at Amain as well (Shumacher part# SCHU4297) and put it on the truck (Thanks, Razor! ).


    When I put that on I did notice that my Kimbrough #124 heavy duty servo saver was getting a little sloppy these days, so I'll address that after this weekends track session. I'm thinking some type of solid servo horn, but don't know yet if I will go with plastic to maintain some give, or aluminum to make the system solid.
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 04-27-2018 at 02:42 PM.
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  9. #329
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Front swaybar looks GOOD! Nice draglink too, I never found a good Traxxas part for that, the adjustable ones were some weird wrench size.
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  10. #330
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    For everything I consider great about your truck, I know you’ll appreciate an aluminum servo horn. I ran a simple one from Racers Edge and it was nice having one more part (that wasn’t very expensive) that I didn’t have to worry about. Pick up a spare set of servo gears just in case lol. It’s an exacting part, and if it’s a little too exacting, you can then start to dial in expo if necessary. I trust your driving skills if you’re crazy enough to race a Rustler

  11. #331
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    Front swaybar looks GOOD! Nice draglink too, I never found a good Traxxas part for that, the adjustable ones were some weird wrench size.
    Thanks, Razor. Yeah, pretty much everything I've ever seen out there is like that for some reason, just weird wrench sizes. Great find on the Schumacher part - never would have thought to look to them for that piece.

    That was one of the things I used to like about the old Tecnacraft links I had leftover & used on my son's truck - they just used a hole in the middle of the link that you could use a hex driver or pinion wrench to make your adjustments. That was a unique and fairly convenient method for adjustments. You can see what I'm talking about here...
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  12. #332
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oaks View Post
    For everything I consider great about your truck, I know you’ll appreciate an aluminum servo horn. I ran a simple one from Racers Edge and it was nice having one more part (that wasn’t very expensive) that I didn’t have to worry about. Pick up a spare set of servo gears just in case lol. It’s an exacting part, and if it’s a little too exacting, you can then start to dial in expo if necessary. I trust your driving skills if you’re crazy enough to race a Rustler
    It's always great to hear from you Oaks, and thanks for the vote of confidence on the driving skills. And you're right, an aluminum servo horn is the way to go. Every time I start to second guess myself on things like that, I have to go back to what all the pros run, and remind myself that the pros are the pros for a reason. I may not be able to drive at a pro level, but if want the truck to be as capable as a pro level truck, then I need to stick with basics of what they use, equipment or hardware wise, anyway. That way no excuses - if it doesn't work well, it's all on me & I can't blame the truck for anything.
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  13. #333
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    I received my aluminum servo horn the other day and got it installed on the truck. I wound up getting an Associated Factory Team 15.5mm one piece horn - part#1366. I chose this one because it was the same length as the Kimbrough servo saver that I was using and keeps the link fairly level and straight while maintaining a nice even throw from front to back. I stayed away from the clamping style horns, as they just seem to me to be just another weak link to strip out or go bad after time. I haven't been to the track with this setup yet, but in testing on the carpet at home it seems very tight and precise. I did dial in just a little expo (thanks Oaks ) to start out with, so it wouldn't be too twitchy or sensitive. Here's how it looks...



    These last few refinements that I've done haven't been anything major, but when each one is added up, they do make a difference in some small way. Next, however, is something that's going to be really big, and something I've wanted to do for a very long time - the transmission. I've talked about building a somewhat custom trans for awhile, and now I have the extra funds to get it done. I don't want to let the cat out of bag just yet, but for now, I will say that it will be my take on what an "ultimate" Traxxas 2WD trans should be. I have all of the necessary parts coming that should arrive within the next week. Once I get them and get it going, I'll put up a detailed post of the build. So, until next time...
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 06-20-2018 at 10:53 PM.
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  14. #334
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Racing Rustler 2.0 CE - The Transmission

    Throughout the last week I received all of the goodies that I ordered for my truck, with the last pieces arriving on Friday. I had to work Saturday, so I only had Saturday night to get everything together if I wanted to be able to test things out on the track Sunday. So, I worked on the truck until about midnight, because I really wanted to run on Sunday, otherwise I would have had to wait another week to know how it all worked out. I'm just not that patient.

    Anyway, I received everything to build the trans that I've wanted to build for a long time, as well as a few more things. First up, the transmission. I'll start by saying that this trans setup is merely my idea of what the perfect Traxxas 2WD trans should be for my application. It's based on my experience with the slightly modified trans that I've had in my truck for some time now. And speaking of my current transmission, I would also like to point out that this trans has nothing wrong with it and has never failed, or had any failed components. I simply wanted to make an even better one, and put my current trans in my son's Slash to give his truck a nice upgrade at the same time. Here's the pile of parts waiting to be assembled.


    I started with a new RPM case in black - I know some have issues with this case, but I have found ways around some of it's weak points, and have had these in all three of my family's trucks for years without a problem. Next, I used a Hot Racing sealed diff - for essentially the same reasons. I thought about an FLM diff, but ultimately decided to stick with the HR one since it has worked so well for me in the past - and again, I've developed several little tricks to get past some of the common issues. Moving up the trans to the idler gear - I used a Robinson Racing hardened steel gear as it is a much higher quality of machining compared to the stock gear. I did use a stock top shaft steel gear, simply because there aren't any good alternatives. For the top shaft itself I got the STRC shaft so that I could use the Associated slipper assembly. And while I'm talking about that... I decided to use the Associated VTS slipper unit. I looked hard at the Avid Triad clutch, which is also a great system, but ultimately went with the AE unit for a couple of reasons. First was instant parts availability - every hobby shop attached to a track will have everything for the AE clutch in stock, should anything break on race day - from the spur gears, to clutch pads, spring, nut, you name it, they'll have it. For the Avid, everything would need to be ordered. Second reason was surface area - both the Avid and the VTS use the same basic design, but the VTS has larger pads & plates for a better surface area of engagement. Before I buttoned up the inside, I also installed a complete set of Boca hybrid ceramic bearings for smoother operation and heat handling abilities. Once again, I did some trial & error with various shims to get the top shaft shimmed just right. This is a critical step, that often gets overlooked. I got some of the 0.5mm factory sized shims as well as some 0.2mm & 0.3mm. I can't stress enough how important getting this exactly right is. Too tight & things will bind and heat up, too loose and it will wiggle around, wearing spur gears, generating heat from friction, and loose efficiency. Kind of the same with the internal side gears in the diff - critical to use both of the little shims they give you in the HR kit, but I also had some extras of those and used one more (3 total) to get the perfect spacing. This not only allows for better gear mesh, but provides proper pressure on the output shaft o'rings to keep leaks from occurring. To finish off the outside I used the Traxxas steel output yokes & H/D sliding axles with an RPM gear cover to keep things clean & protected. Here's a shot of the completed unit with the cover off, showing the VTS unit.


    The other items and a full track report will have to wait for the next post, but to finish the transmission portion, here's a list with part numbers of all of the components that make up what I think is the perfect Traxxas 2WD trans;

    RPM Trans Case (Black) - #73612
    Hot Racing sealed Diff Case - #TE38CH
    Traxxas planetary Diff gears - #2382
    Robinson Racing Hardened Idler Gear - #7857
    Traxxas Steel Top Drive Gear - #3195
    STRC Machined Trans Layshaft - #ST3793AE
    AE VTS Slipper Conversion Set - #91175
    AE V2 Spring & Washer Set - #7486
    AE V2 Vented Hubs (for inner) - #7495
    Traxxas Steel Output Yokes - #4628X
    Traxxas HD Driveshafts - #6852X
    Boca Ceramic Bearings - #58-065C-YS

    In the end this transmission is smooth, quiet, runs extremely cool, and has less than half the rolling resistance of my previous trans setup - but more on that later...
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 06-25-2018 at 06:29 PM.
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  15. #335
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    Very nice.

  16. #336
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Purty! I love me a smooth transmission!
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  17. #337
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys! This thing is amazingly smooth. I think the biggest contributor to that is the ceramic bearings both in the trans, and the rear axles. They're expensive, but worth it in the end.
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  18. #338
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Now about those other pieces and mods.... They're nothing as significant as the trans, but good stuff nonetheless. First, I decided to give some new tires a try - Proline Wedges in the front & Pyramids in the rear, mounted on the same DE Racing Speedline wheels. I really love the JConcepts tires that I've been using for the past year on this track, but I wanted to try the Prolines simply because everyone there runs them on all types of vehicles, buggy's, trucks, etc. They grip really well on the track & turn on a dime. I'm not sure if it was because they were new and not broken in yet, but they did seem a bit grabby compared to the JConcepts. Also, as I mentioned before, they have a little taller sidewall/overall diameter, so they did raise the ride height a small amount, but I was able to adjust most of that out with a minor pre-load adjustment. You can see what I mean here, although in this picture the truck doesn't have a battery in it.


    The next new thing I got for the truck was something just for fun - a new chassis protector. Since I had to remove the old one to take the trans out, I replaced it with a very cool "sticker bomb" one from the same people that made the checkered flag protector I had on there. I think it adds some character to the truck.


    The last two things I did were more changes to what I had, than actual new pieces. The first was to the T-Bone Racing rear skid/bumper. I modified this a little more by thinning out the sides a bit and then drilling some hole in the part that covers the motor. This dropped about 7-8 grams of weight off the far rear of the truck, and opened up bumper for better airflow and motor cooling. You can see what I'm talking about in the very bottom of the above picture.

    Last, but not least, I've been experimenting with some weight distribution stuff. In particular with the brass battery box weight set that I've had for awhile. Up to now I've only really used the two weights (one 22g and one 36g) with my lightest 3600mAh battery. But in talking with some of the regulars and pros at the track, they suggested to run the truck a little heavier with the other battery's as well. Now I have the 36g gram weight taped in the bottom of the battery tray, and run it all the time regardless of what battery is in the truck, and I have the 22g weight taped to the bottom of the 3600 mAh pack, so it has both still when using that pack.


    Next up will be the track report to let you know how everything worked.
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 06-26-2018 at 10:33 AM.
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  19. #339
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    Man I just got done reading this whole thread and all I can say is wow! I recently got rid of my rustler and slash out of frustration, I'm not a racer (mainly due to the lack of decent tracks near me), but everything was so worn out and lacking in performance that i would have ended up building a new truck from scratch to get it to where I wanted it. Instead of staying with the stock rustler style I wanted to do something a little different, so I decided to use an rpm gearbox and make a mid-motor frankenstein stadium truck inspired by Dr.Isotopes slash8. I absolutely love your attention to detail and seeing everything from an actual racers perspective has confirmed my suspicions and ideas about the adjustability I want. This leads me to my question, would you recommend going with the associated shocks over the upgraded ultras for someone who isn't a serious racer? The other big issue for me is that my local hobby shop doesn't really carry losi or associate stuff. Thanks for all the amazing information in this thread and any other input you could provide. (one more thing id like to add is that my family actually races full sized cars so i am very detail and performance oriented and am looking for the best overall tun-ability and quality)
    Last edited by racercb; 06-26-2018 at 12:45 PM.

  20. #340
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Thanks racercb, and glad you enjoyed reading about the build. I thought about your question, and I think I have a useful suggestion for you on the shocks. Between the upgraded Ultra shocks & the Associated, I'd get the Associated all day long - the advantage in volume just can't compare. Even though the upgraded Ultra's are really good, you'll spend as much upgrading them as you will purchasing something with a higher volume anyway. That being said, with no local Associated or Losi parts support, I wouldn't get either. Even though you may not be a serious racer, I'm sure you'll want the best performance you can get for your shock purchasing dollar. I presume you have support for Traxxas products near you (they're everywhere, after all), so if I were you, I would get the Traxxas GTR shocks. They have the large volume of the latest AE or Losi shocks, are PTFE coated, have threaded aluminum bodies, and come with Ti-Ni shafts - all pre-assembled and ready to go (less springs) for a decent price. The only reasons I didn't go with those myself were limited piston selection to fine tune them to a specific track. Otherwise, they are a great, easy upgrade with all of the qualities I believe from your description that you are looking for. You can check them out here; https://www.amainhobbies.com/traxxas...a7461x/p248574
    https://www.amainhobbies.com/traxxas...a7462x/p248575

    I hope this suggestion helps and will work for you.
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  21. #341
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    i have thought about the traxxas shocks before, but wasn't sure on the build quality and tuning options compared to the associated. For me it would be worth having to buy spare parts if i had better tuning options. I was also looking and saw that i could get those oval ported delrin pistons for the associated shocks too, but was wondering if you had any experience with other dual rate pistons.

  22. #342
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Build quality of the GTR's is good. Between the GTR's and the Associated, I'd still go with the Associated shocks if local parts availability isn't an issue for you. The GTR's do have various piston and spring selections, but their measurements of those things don't correspond well to everyone else's (newton-meters as opposed to in-lb & such), making it a pain to have any real frame of reference. And yes, CSI Inc. makes the ported delrin pistons for many other manufacturer's shocks, Associated included, but they aren't really necessary with the number of choices available in factory machined pistons. I only used them for the modified Ultra shocks because Traxxas only offered pistons in a one hole, two hole, and three hole configuration, but no different sizes in any of the hole choices. The two hole were too small for most racing applicatons, and the three hole was too much. (The one hole was just useless for anything) I've never had any experience with dual rate pistons. I looked at them at one time, long before I purchased the Associated shocks, when I was still modifying the Ultra's, and almost got some that RPM made. But, what I found was that they were a big flash in the pan for a short while years ago, then they just died out. When I researched why, it seems the universal consensus was that they didn't really work any better/different than conventional pistons. Racers at that time found that the newer generation of machined (not molded) pistons worked better, with less friction.
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  23. #343
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    Thanks again for all the amazing information, I was mainly looking at the ported pistons as a midpoint between dual rate pistons and traditional. I have been researching other various dual piston set ups and i can't decide if its worth the extra headache over the ported pistons. could you maybe give me a part number on the associated shocks? I'm not sure which ones fit the front and rear.
    Last edited by racercb; 06-26-2018 at 11:47 PM.

  24. #344
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    You're welcome, glad to be of help. The Associated shock kit numbers are 91497 for the front, and 91499 for the rear.
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  25. #345
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    Wow, What an awesome Build Man! I skimmed through the majority of the thread looking for lists of what you have. I don't race my rustler on a track, but I'm doing a build myself, so I hope you don't mind if I borrow off of your list a little.
    If you ain't getting dirty, you ain't having fun.

  26. #346
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Thank you - and always glad that any info here can help someone with their build.
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  27. #347
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    So now to finish off this update of the recent things done to the truck with the most important part - the track update. I'll start with the steering, since I actually did that first, but haven't been to the track with it changed until this past weekend. The problem that I was having was with my old Kimbrough #124 HD servo saver. It was starting to get sticky just off center, so whenever you moved the wheel a tiny bit, it would stick just to one side a little. It would move if you moved the wheel, but if you moved it too far it would stick the other way just off center. Getting the truck to drive down the straight was like herding cattle. Obviously well worn out from 2 years of abuse, I went with the solid aluminum arm I mentioned previously. This was the best thing I could have done for myself. Steering is now spot on, lightning quick, and solid as a rock with no play at all. It took a few laps to get used to how responsive it was now. As I also mentioned before, I did dial in a little exponential (5%) to help my cause, which seemed perfect - i didn't touch that setting the whole day. This track is fairly small with a bunch of really tight 180 degree turns, so this type of precision was definitely a very welcome improvement.

    As for the transmission... All I can say about that is - Oh my God!! For being the same basic design, and even using a few of the same components as the old transmission, the difference is night and day. The biggest difference is in the massive reduction to rolling resistance. I knew the minute I put the case halves together and spun the shaft that it would be a big improvement, but had no idea what that would translate to on the track. Full throttle is noticeably faster - to the point that every time I hit full throttle going down the straight the handful of people watching from the pits would go "Whoa!!" in unison. It was really quite impressive to watch. Of course the flip side to that was trying to slow down. I could only hold full throttle about halfway down the 80ft long straight before I would have to let off and immediately get into full braking if I had any chance of making the 180 at the end. As a point of reference, I have brake strength at 100%, brake frequency set to the most aggressive setting, and the ABS turned all the way up - and still could barely get slowed down enough to make the turn. Other than a short blip of the throttle to clear various jumps, nowhere else on this track could I even come close to using full throttle. By about the middle of my first run I was getting used to how the truck drove and found that about half throttle was all I could use around all of the track, other than the start of the straightaway. With that I was able to keep a good steady rhythm and sail around the track lap after lap.

    The last part of the trans to talk about is the clutch. Previously, I had the Associated vented V2 clutch on the truck, which was a huge improvement over stock. The VTS clutch is almost as big a leap forward over the V2. The first thing I noticed when I installed the trans & set it up was that it could be set much more loosely. I originally tightened it to where the V2 clutch was, but when i ran it on the carpet at home for a quick test, it would just yank the front wheels of the ground. I kept loosening it more & more until finally I wound up at the factory recommended setting of 1mm from the end of the shaft and it was perfect. Once I got to the track, I never touched it all day from that setting. Nailing the throttle coming onto the straight I could hear it squeal for about a truck length or so, and that was it. As the truck accelerated, it never lifted the front wheels off the ground from there, like the V2 would when set up properly. The 3 pad arrangement works extremely well, and for an additional $15 is well worth the investment for the control it gives.

    For this track the average lap times (with most layouts, including this one) for the "fast" guys with buggy's is about 17.0-17.5 seconds. I averaged between 17-18 second laps all day. On my last pack of the day I had the track all to myself. The track regulars were there, but just shooting the breeze in the pits relaxing. This allowed me to observe something very important that I wouldn't have noticed with more vehicles on the track - the sound. All I could hear was the light whirring of the motor, not even breaking a sweat, cruising around the track a half throttle. Don't get me wrong, the truck was flying, and I was pushing it hard (as I always do during practice) to make time, but the motor wasn't even breathing hard to maintain that pace. The trans was almost completely silent - or at the very least, muffled by the light whir of the motor & tires. I could actually hear the rubber of the tires grinding through the carpet in the turns over everything else, when I was off throttle. By the time it came to this last run I think the new tires were finally getting broken in. I was out there for just over 15 minutes and was in such a great rhythm that I only made one driving mistake that required being marshaled. During this run I wound up putting in somewhere between 50-55 laps (yes, I torture this truck on practice days)- I lost count as I was more focused on straining to hear every sound the truck made, or more accurately, didn't make.

    After each long run, the motor came off much cooler than it used to. Normally with long runs like that it would get to about 160 degrees, and take about 10-15 minutes to cool down with a (track provided) fan blowing on it. With the greatly reduced friction from the trans it was coming off at 140 degrees, and was cooled to room temperature in about 5-7 minutes.

    I'm pretty excited about not only how well everything seemed to work, but more particularly, how everything came together as a whole to make the truck perform as well as it does in all aspects. Also, my last experiments with weight distribution now have the truck perfectly balanced. The way it sits today it's incredibly easy to drive really fast around the carpet, and makes me look like a much better driver than I am.
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 06-27-2018 at 04:20 PM.
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  28. #348
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Iím curious on what rear springs you ended up with? For high traction clay, I found the AE 72mm greens to be soft, canít remember if Iím using white or gray.
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  29. #349
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    I’m curious on what rear springs you ended up with? For high traction clay, I found the AE 72mm greens to be soft, can’t remember if I’m using white or gray.
    Hey, Razor, good to hear from you. How have you been? Well, I hope. I'm currently running the AE 72mm white springs in the rear. I've tried the gray in back, but they were a little too heavy - the truck seems to rotate better with the white. Those with the AE 35WT oil & 1.6 two hole pistons work really well for overall handling and jumping/landing characteristics on the carpet.
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  30. #350
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingTigerDad View Post
    Hey, Razor, good to hear from you. How have you been? Well, I hope. I'm currently running the AE 72mm white springs in the rear. I've tried the gray in back, but they were a little too heavy - the truck seems to rotate better with the white. Those with the AE 35WT oil & 1.6 two hole pistons work really well for overall handling and jumping/landing characteristics on the carpet.
    Nice, things are good, haven’t driven the Rustler in a while but been putting it back together to do some radio testing. I was using TLR shocks and think I used AE truck white in the rear with 37.5wt AE oil with 1.7mm hole pistons, so pretty much the same.
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  31. #351
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    Nice, things are good, haven’t driven the Rustler in a while but been putting it back together to do some radio testing. I was using TLR shocks and think I used AE truck white in the rear with 37.5wt AE oil with 1.7mm hole pistons, so pretty much the same.
    Glad you're doing well. Good to hear you'll be running the Rustler again too. The setups are very similar, and that should work well with the white springs out back for the clay track that you run on.
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  32. #352
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Time for a little update.... I've been wanting to upgrade the ESC in this truck for awhile - nothing wrong with the Reedy Blackbox 1000Z that was in it, I just wanted something a little more sophisticated with more adjustable features. As a matter of fact the Blackbox has been rock solid for the last two years in this truck, so much so that I wanted to use it in my wife's truck and give her's a nice brushless upgrade from the XL5/Titan brushed setup that it's had in it since I built it.

    Since this has been on my mind for some time, I've had a lot time to research some of the latest ESC's on the market, make a bunch of comparison's, (change my mind a million times! ) and ultimately decide what I really wanted. In the end I decided on a Maclan MMax Pro 160A. I choose this one over all others not only because of its power, but also due to its having some very special features that not all others posses. It has all of the usual stuff that the higher end ESC's have (various timing settings, throttle & brake frequency adjustments, drag brake, punch control, motor reversing, etc.), and has them in a finer resolution, or greater number of choices manner. For instance, drag brake can be adjusted from 0-100% in increments of 1 instead of 5 that only go up to 30%. There are many other examples within the normal setting choices like that, so I wont go into all of them, but suffice it to say that it has more than enough to keep someone busy playing with them for a long time. The two things that really stood out to me, and that make this unit special are first, the processor - at 32 bit instead of an 8 bit like most ESC's, and second, (this was a biggie for me) is the fact that it can be programmed and updated by using an app on my phone! I just thought that was too cool , and made so much sense in a phone-centric world. Of course it can also be programmed in the usual manner, with a program box, or a computer - but where's the fun in that?!

    Once I made my choice, I already knew that I wanted to hand down my old ESC to my wife's truck, and subsequently, would need a brushless motor to go with it as well. So I looked at what Maclan had for combo's with a 13.5T motor. This ESC by itself runs about $200, their 13.5T MRR motor normally runs $90 by itself. They (Amain) had the motor on sale for $75, and the combo on sale for $250. When combined with a $35 discount coupon, it was too good to pass up. If you paid regular price for the ESC, it's like getting their motor for $15!

    So I got the Maclan ESC (along with some more carpet tires/wheels and few other small things) installed in the truck, made a few minor changes to the truck where the ESC mounts, and got everything programmed and adjusted. Here's how it looks...




    My initial impression of the MMax Pro is that it is of extremely high quality and very sophisticated - I kind of think of as the iPhone of ESC's. So far I've only run around the house a little getting it setup, so I'll provide some more detailed info once I have the opportunity to run it on the track.
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  33. #353
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    I made it to the track last weekend with my truck to test out the new Mmax Pro ESC - and Wow, is this thing ever powerful! The Blackbox 1000Z that was in it previously was no slouch at 100A continuous current, but you can certainly feel all of the 160A continuous current that this pumps out. I started with what I thought were some pretty conservative settings, and never changed from those all day. Both power delivery and braking were super smooth and precise. Drag brake was excellent, especially on the carpet surface. The only setting I really bumped up a bit from what the Blackbox had was the turbo (wide open throttle only) timing - the Blackbox only had a maximum of 15 degrees, I started the Maclan with 20. With the general power of this unit, and the added turbo timing, for the first time ever with my truck on this track I could be completely stopped at the base of any of the doubles, yank full throttle and clear them with ease. Using the Mmax Pro has certainly opened up a whole new dimension of driving this truck for me, as I don't seem to be lacking in any area of performance where power delivery or braking is concerned. Needless to say, this ESC, and Maclan products get a big thumbs up from me.



    The only additional notes to the track day test would be regarding temps, that I monitored very carefully, being a new setup - particularly running a little more timing. After each long run (15 minutes or so), I measured both the ESC and motor temps. Consistently the ESC came back at 98-99 degrees, and the motor was 138-142 depending on what battery I was running. I did install the included fan on the ESC before going that day, even though it's not in the pictures - although after running it pretty hard and having temps come back so low I may remove it and save some weight.
    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 10-13-2018 at 05:22 PM.
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  34. #354
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    It looks like it fits in there perfectly!! Nice and lightweight as well.

    I'd like to hear your strategy of why you change the brake settings at the different track surfaces...as time allows.

    That truck is BOSS!
    MTFBWY

  35. #355
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synnergy View Post
    It looks like it fits in there perfectly!! Nice and lightweight as well.

    I'd like to hear your strategy of why you change the brake settings at the different track surfaces...as time allows.

    That truck is BOSS!
    Thanks Synnergy - I really appreciate it.

    Brake settings for different track surfaces is all about available traction, and weight transfer. On high grip surfaces, like carpet, you can have, and will want, much stronger braking simply because you have the available traction to use the brakes more aggressively without the rear end breaking loose and sliding around. You'll want that strong braking to be able to slow down enough to negotiate the tight, high grip turns without traction rolling. Loose, slippery conditions, like a dirt track, will require a much lighter/softer brake application due to the lack of traction, that will break the rear end loose and spin you out while trying to slow for the turns.

    There are several different ways to make these brake adjustments. Many modern radios are equipped with ABS that can be adjusted for strength and pulse rate to accomplish this, as well as adjustable exponential points. Most all modern ESC's have brake strength percentage adjustments, and PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) frequency choices that will vary drastically how the brakes react when applied. Lower frequencies providing more aggressive braking, and higher frequencies giving a softer application at the expense of higher ESC temps - kind of like an internal resistor.

    The other side of the coin for braking is on the vehicle itself regarding weight transfer. This is where limiting droop comes into play. Like everything on an RC vehicle, it's all about balance and sacrifice. A lot of suspension droop (or negative suspension travel) will be great for landing big jumps softly, but lousy for both side-to-side weight transfer (cornering) and front-to-rear weight transfer (braking and accelerating traction). Again - all about finding that perfect balance for the condition and type of surface you run on.
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  36. #356
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    Whatup FTD!! I have a question for you. The pro-2 caster block/knuckle combo, have you had any issue with bent pins there? Do you know if the knuckle is compatible with some of the aluminum caster blocks? I hope all is well!
    MTFBWY

  37. #357
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Hey Synnergy, I'm doing well thanks, and hope you are too. The ProLine plastic castor blocks are terrible. I got them in the combo that you mentioned mainly for the nice steering knuckles, so I gave them a try back then. I really wanted to like them because of all the camber link choices they offered - 3 instead of the usual 1 or 2. Unfortunately, they are as soft and weak as their shock towers, and more bendable than the stock or RPM castor blocks. They will most certainly bend pins - they even bent the titanium pins I was using at the time.

    The good news is the steering knuckles work great - I love how they "capture" the entire camber link ends. I've had no issues with those at all for some time on my truck, even with the harsh carpet track conditions. I have them on my wife's Rustler, and my son's Slash as well, and no issues or failures there either. They are compatible with all types of aluminum castor blocks. Between my families three trucks we have three different types of castor blocks - Pro2 blocks on my truck, Traxxas blocks on my wife's, and STRC blocks on my son's, and they fit/work great with all of them.
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  38. #358
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    The End of the Carpet

    I found out earlier that SCVRC (Santa Clarita Valley Radio Control), the carpet track that I run on, is closing their doors permanently as of today. They posted the announcement on their Facebook page, and there was also a mention on LiveRC here; https://www.liverc.com/news/announce...ing_the_doors/

    That leaves me (and all the other carpet racers) with no carpet track in the area to run on for hundreds of miles - the next closest carpet track being 702 Raceway in Las Vegas. I still have the outdoor track - Hot Rod Hobbies to run on, but running there can be very sporadic with heat issues in summer, and rain in the winter. Also, the two surfaces are about as polar opposites as you can get.

    This news leaves me both extremely sad (as I hate to see any RC facility go out of business), and with a decision to make. Do I convert everything I have over to dirt so I can run there? Or is it time for an extended break from RC altogether? Don't really know what direction I'll go, so for now I think I'll take some time to think about things and pursue some of the other hobby's that my family and I enjoy.
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  39. #359
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    I'm sorry to hear about your indoor track closing. I feel your pain. My indoor carpet track closed down a little over 2 years ago, forcing me to go to the outdoor track, Like You, in the hot South Florida summer heat.

    What other Hobbies do you enjoy with your family just out of curiosity?

    Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk

  40. #360
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    That's too bad to hear about the track closing, out where I live the nearest RC shop is 40-50 minutes drive away after the shops closed down on by one. Unfortunately the population that is supplementing the people leaving the state are more interested in getting their kids in tutoring clubs, soccer leagues, and cricket teams than letting them be kids and get into what we consider as normal hobbies.

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