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  1. #1
    RC Racer w8liftn's Avatar
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    Help! Stripped Stainless Screw....... Tried Everything

    Did my first major run since installing my aluminum upper and lower arms, hubs, Power Up Kit, stiffer springs, and shock oil in my V1. Brought it home to disassemble, clean, and inspect and I stripped the head of a stainless screw that secures the bottom of the shock to the lower suspension arm. I'm panicking and was hoping some of you guys have had this happen and might be able to help me out?

    I tried soaking in WD-40, different tools, and even vice grips but it's not budging. I have one of those E-Z out kits but nothing is small enough to work on this size screw. I'm super- because these were high-dollar replacements for the stock screws AND I am always careful about NOT doing this. I'm thinking that since it's facing the front wheels they threw a ton of gravel at it for the last couple of hours and it wasn't my stupidity (not that it matters, it's still stripped).
    Last edited by Double G; 02-26-2017 at 07:40 PM. Reason: language

  2. #2
    RC Racer
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    Can you use your dremel with the cut off wheel and slot the head to use a flat head screw driver.....if you can upload a picture that will help get you better answers.
    Open every day....

  3. #3
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    I agree with 2skills25 also you can try using a soldering iron to heat up the bolt some times that helps break loose corrosion or rust sometimes. Other wise I would cut the head of the screw off and drill out the the rest and re tap it.
    V1 BL5/2028, V2 max6/5882, Erevo, Summit, Rustler.

  4. #4
    RC Racer w8liftn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maddogg951 View Post
    I agree with 2skills25 also you can try using a soldering iron to heat up the bolt some times that helps break loose corrosion or rust sometimes. Other wise I would cut the head of the screw off and drill out the the rest and re tap it.
    There's no corrosion, it's a brand-new aluminum arm and brand-new stainless screw. I still cant believe that the head stripped. I spent three hours trying everything I could find online to do. I absolutely don't want to re-tap. I pulled it off and am taking it in to Lowe's to see if I can find a tool to grip it. The dang thing is so small that none of my screw extractor kits will fit. I've seen a couple online that look that small so I may have to order one. FRUSTRATING when I pay so much for stainless screws and one strips out first time. The others seem fine. I still think it's because the front wheels were hammering it with gravel when I took it to the gravel pits yesterday.

    Thanks for the suggestions anyway.

  5. #5
    Marshal Double G's Avatar
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    When a screw has stripped I have taken my Dremel and cut a slot across the head so I can use a slotted screwdriver to remove it.
    The Super Derecho

  6. #6
    RC Racer
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    Get some epoxy and glue another screw with a hex head same size as the head of your striped screw. Let it cure and back it out.

  7. #7
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    Have you tried to use a rubberband as a filler. Sometimes this will help but normally is used when dealing with a stripped phillips head screw.

  8. #8
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    Do you have a pic so we can see the problem? Stainless steel is pretty worthless in rc cars. Way to soft. Its easy to drill out thats on the bright side... many people dont know that stainless steel gets eaten away by steel. Its reacts to one another....

  9. #9
    RC Racer
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    Does not matter what type of metal you use. If you have two different types together they will react and add in moisture or current and it will be worse. Aluminum will loose the battle. Using stainless in aluminum one has to be aware of what type of stainless as some is much more reactive especially in aluminum. Anti-seize would be some help.

    Gravel pits can have some nasty ground water in puddles. I've seen it take the polished finish off aluminum. Getting those lower threads wet with that type of water would do a number on your alloy parts.

  10. #10
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    I sincerely do not believe that galvanic corrosion is the culprit here. There hasn't been enough time and I doubt that the parts have been in the presence of a strong enough electrolyte to significantly speed the corrosion.
    While it is true that stainless steel will corrode much faster than carbon steel when in contact with aluminum (go figure!) I think that the gravel in the gravel pits combined with typically low-strength SS being inappropriate for the job is what led to this impasse.
    Good luck with the extraction. Other than that, there's nothing I can add except: if you used thread locker, you definitely want to hit those parts with a torch; and I hope it doesn't cost you an arm.
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  11. #11
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    I had one of these over the weekend on my TT-02, hex screw that had loctite and started to round off. Couldn't get to it with the vice grips, the back out drill bit thing-ama-jig didn't work, so eventually just drilled the bejesus out of it with a smaller bit and miraculously everything turned out great - screw came out, threads were ok on female part...got lucky basically.

    Best of luck with your issue, i know how frustrating these can be.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksb51rl View Post
    I sincerely do not believe that galvanic corrosion is the culprit here. There hasn't been enough time and I doubt that the parts have been in the presence of a strong enough electrolyte to significantly speed the corrosion.
    While it is true that stainless steel will corrode much faster than carbon steel when in contact with aluminum (go figure!) I think that the gravel in the gravel pits combined with typically low-strength SS being inappropriate for the job is what led to this impasse.
    Good luck with the extraction. Other than that, there's nothing I can add except: if you used thread locker, you definitely want to hit those parts with a torch; and I hope it doesn't cost you an arm.
    Not saying his stainless screw got stuck because of the metal got eatin away. Just telling why I dont use it. Hope his problem gets solved.

  13. #13
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter81 View Post
    Not saying his stainless screw got stuck because of the metal got eatin away. Just telling why I dont use it. Hope his problem gets solved.
    I don't use them because the stainless is not even as strong as grade 2 hardware, commonly used as shear pins, lol.
    For another reason, see this explanation of thread galling/cold welding.
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  14. #14
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    Mentioned earlier, can you put a couple of photos up - help us understand what purchase and access you have / have not?

    Al.

  15. #15
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atom3624 View Post
    Mentioned earlier, can you put a couple of photos up - help us understand what purchase and access you have / have not?

    Al.
    It has been a long time since I read the word "purchase" used as a synonym for grip, grasp, or hold. You must be writing in ENGLISH, lol.
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  16. #16
    RC Racer w8liftn's Avatar
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    Hey guys, I guess I didn't understand the Dremel suggestion at first. After running around town for a couple of hours looking for an "E-Z Out" tool this small, I decided to order one online. Guess I should've looked back here sooner because Double G's explanation finally clicked in my head and I tried that. After some coercion I was able to get it out. No idea why it seemed welded in there, no dirt, no corrosion, nothing. Thought stainless was the way to go, why else would they cost so much more, right?

    Love these forums because no matter what happens, someone has already been there.

    Again, much thanks for all of the suggestions and help!

  17. #17
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    @Why welded in there: impact(s).

    A hardened (grade 12.9 metric) steel screw with black oxide coating and a little maintenance will do you much better than stainless. My 2.

    So glad you got it out.
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  18. #18
    RC Racer w8liftn's Avatar
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    Front side of this arm holding lower pin for shock mount btw (didn't have time to take a pic, this is one I already posted in another thread).


  19. #19
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    +1 on the 12.9 high tensile, 'black oxide' coated as the toughest. They do tend to rust despite the 'coating', so as mentioned, a 'bit of maintenance' from time to time as this is an all weather beast.

    Al.

  20. #20
    RC Racer
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    I bought these from menards and they have yet to fail me.

    http://www.menards.com/main/tools-ha...47403159749622

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmarzke View Post
    I bought these from menards and they have yet to fail me.

    http://www.menards.com/main/tools-ha...47403159749622
    Definately worth the money when using hex screws. Have a similar set from a Canadian distributer. 🖒

  22. #22
    RC Racer
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    I encountered similar problems with stuck screws in aluminum upgrades with my old T-Maxx. Yet another lesson learned and I now stick to stock suspension parts.

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