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  1. #1
    RC Qualifier Charger Man's Avatar
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    ERevo 2.0 Diff carrier, plastic or aluminum?

    I see that Traxxas offers a 8681x aluminum diff carrier for the front and rear diffs. Is it worth it or just keep the stock plastic carriers 8681.

    Thanks


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  2. #2
    RC Racer
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    I think they make them for a reason. I'd buy one for $20 as a back up, maybe spider gears also.

  3. #3
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    They make them to earn money. Just as they made the new erevo with weak parts you have to replace.
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  4. #4
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronnyen View Post
    They make them to earn money. Just as they made the new erevo with weak parts you have to replace.
    They make all their products to “earn money.” If you are claiming that parts are intentionally made to fail, you can please take that conspiracy theory stuff away from here.
    No new product is perfect to every user. I’ve seen some recent lists of breakages of the original ERBE that are almost totally different than mine. Chasing a bulletproof system is a neverending endeavor. Allowing users to choose a certain amount of their own upgrades is a better approach.
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  5. #5
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    Dont be so naive. If they made them bulletproof,I dont say they can, but if, they wouldnt earn any money. You know nylon stockings, they was unbreakable when they first came on the market. So they made them weaker, or else noone bought new ones. Thats how things work in the world of money.
    Slash 4x4 / Erbe / Custum Erbe / Bandit VXL

  6. #6
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
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    ERevo 2.0 Diff carrier, plastic or aluminum?

    Thanks for that. My degree and professional licenses and decades of experience in business, both owning my own and being part of the larger corporate world, supervising dozens of employees, etc etc did not prepare me for your profound understanding of economics and the “world of money.” (Where is the “laughter with tears” emoji?)
    Build it unbreakable and certainly almost nobody would buy it because nobody would be able to afford it. This is a given, and a reason such albatrosses are not designed, let alone built. Systems are designed with acceptable failures. The trick is to balance such losses with initial cost and cost to repair/replace. Resources for design and production are not limitless, something that those who whine about intentionally designing parts to fail never seem to comprehend. Ironically, those same people are the one who are most likely to whine about the cost of a overdesigned or overbuilt product.
    Alt-248 on the number pad = °

  7. #7
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    Sorry to offend you then, should have known you knew better than me. Nothing to see here, move along.
    Slash 4x4 / Erbe / Custum Erbe / Bandit VXL

  8. #8
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. olds97_lss's Avatar
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    All that craziness aside, alloy diff cups tend to hold up better over time and are less susceptible to flex when under strain. The stock cups are built pretty tough though, with steel inserts for the x pins and using 4 spider gears like a 1/8th diff. I don't know if the output hole in the cup is a steel insert like some 1/8th buggies are, but that would be likely to wear faster than aluminum if it's plastic. In the photo's, it does look plastic to me in the stock cup.

    One thing that bugs me a little is that they use 2 different sized bearings for the entire diff though. Would have been better if they had used a 12x21 bearing on both ends. Means less things to keep on hand, and larger bearings tend to hold up better over time.
    https://www.youtube.com/c/olds97lss

  9. #9
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    the real question is: has anyone ever broke the stock plastic ones? it would be interesting to know in which setup and conditions did it happen.
    Quote Originally Posted by olds97_lss View Post
    All that craziness aside, alloy diff cups tend to hold up better over time and are less susceptible to flex when under strain. The stock cups are built pretty tough though, with steel inserts for the x pins and using 4 spider gears like a 1/8th diff. I don't know if the output hole in the cup is a steel insert like some 1/8th buggies are, but that would be likely to wear faster than aluminum if it's plastic. In the photo's, it does look plastic to me in the stock cup.

    One thing that bugs me a little is that they use 2 different sized bearings for the entire diff though. Would have been better if they had used a 12x21 bearing on both ends. Means less things to keep on hand, and larger bearings tend to hold up better over time.
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  10. #10
    RC Qualifier Charger Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by manzamanna View Post
    the real question is: has anyone ever broke the stock plastic ones? it would be interesting to know in which setup and conditions did it happen.

    Inviato dal mio SM-G960F utilizzando Tapatalk
    I’ve been abusing mine with stock plastic cups and haven’t had a problem. My e-revo 1.0 got the Losi LST diff mod and the plastic cup in those diffs are still going strong after 3+ years of abuse on 6s. I’m sure there is some configuration that would benefit from it. I would definitely have the aluminum diff cups in the 2.0 ERevo if I used the self-righting feature. But I choose not to use that.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charger Man View Post
    I’ve been abusing mine with stock plastic cups and haven’t had a problem. My e-revo 1.0 got the Losi LST diff mod and the plastic cup in those diffs are still going strong after 3+ years of abuse on 6s. I’m sure there is some configuration that would benefit from it. I would definitely have the aluminum diff cups in the 2.0 ERevo if I used the self-righting feature. But I choose not to use that.


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    bah, I am of the idea that if it doesn't brake, it doesn't worth to change. I've been using a lot the self righting feature with 6s and stock talons. even when my rear diff was in very bad conditions (see image attached) the plastic cup was ok. Soon I will change the rear diff oil viscosity to 100k, let's see if it will break.

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  12. #12
    RC Champion nickruger's Avatar
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    I had to rebuild the rear early on. Parts were scarce, so the 20$ metal one was available and the plastic was out of stock everywhere. I went with the metal one. The diffs are well built, both the plastic and metal have precise fit on all seals and components. I feel it's a preference. If my diff fails in the same fashion I think the metal one will survive, where the plastic one won't.

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