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  1. #41
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention what fluid to use in the center diff, I think 100k is a good place to start for high traction, and probably around 50k for low traction.

    Going up in weight will make the truck more aggressively use its 4wd on acceleration and braking. That will work better on high traction surfaces and with high-power where you have enough traction to use the aggressive nature. It can also help on lower traction to avoid the front end unloading too much under hard acceleration and losing forward drive. If you go up too high, you will essentially lock your front and rear ends and have trouble gracefully arcing through corners. In low traction, you may end up doing 4wd drifts.

    Going down in weight will soften the truck and make it more fluid and corner better. If you go down too low, you can lose forward traction and you may lose braking power.

    So basically there will be a sweet spot for your center diff to get enough forward drive for your conditions/tires, while still allowing the truck to fluidly get through the corners.
    Last edited by RazorRC22; 06-01-2018 at 01:39 AM.
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  2. #42
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #7 Front and rear diffs

    Front and rear diffs control how much you want to allow the inside and outside wheels to run at different speeds in the corner. A good baseline is 20k front and 10k rear. Rear diff fluids are usually run at about half the weight of the front, although I've run anywhere between 1:1 or 3:1 ratio (example: 10k/10k or 20k/7k). This is because the front wheels will run at closer speeds (outer and inner) than the rears, as the fronts follow a more similar line than the rears will.

    In general, heavier weights will give you more forward/braking traction as the wheels won't have a tendency to diff out under acceleration or heavy braking. Lighter weights will allow you to corner more easily as the tires won't be trying to push you straight all the time.

    If your truck is rolling a lot and unloading the inside wheels, you may find it necessary to go up in diff fluid to keep the truck going forward and not spin/diff out. If your truck does not roll a lot, you can get away with running lighter fluids because the wheels are both sticking to the ground and not unloading/diffing out.

    A good weight to aim for is the lightest weight you can get away with and not diff out under heavy acceleration/braking when exiting/entering the corners.
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  3. #43
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    OK, if you made it this far and applied the concepts, you should have a reasonably decent set up truck. The goal up to this point was to make sure you have a truck that is in the ballpark in terms of basic setup, and you don't have anything completely out of bounds setup-wise that is going to make it do weird things and be hard to fix.

    The next step is to break down driving into specific phases, go over basic vehicle dynamics, and then fine-tune adjustments from there to get it to drive the way you want it to.

    So at this point, go drive it, have fun, and we'll get into the next stuff later on.
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  4. #44
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    So, Razor- whatís next?
    $+RC+more$+friends+more$=FUN!
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  5. #45
    RC Qualifier NitroBugg's Avatar
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    Fantastic tutorial for for setting up a rig! I will try these settings on my Ultimate and see how it does. Don't race, but I have access to an indoor dirt track. So far, I've only adjusted the preload rings some, and it runs pretty good as is. Everything else on it "out of the box stock".

    A question I have is: I have a Platinum I'm setting up as a basher\monster type truck. Will run 95% of the time in grass, dirt, and some jumps (nothing radical), and wondered how much of this setup could be carried over, and what would need to be changed?

    Will be running a 1512-2650KV motor on 3S 5000\35C battery. (for now)

    Driveline upgraded to accommodate the extra power, and the 2.8 Trencher tires.

    Have my F/R diffs at 50K/50K for now, and using the stock slipper clutch (no mods).

    Haven't touched the shocks yet either. Has stock weight oil, and stock springs. Front on front, and rear on rear. Stock shock towers, and black sway bars F/R. I know the suspension seems a little soft as it is, and will need to be changed some.

    Again, I'm just looking for a "baseline" to work from. I'm sure it will need some tweaks depending on terrain, and my driving style, and I can adjust it from there. Any and all suggestions are welcome.

  6. #46
    RC Qualifier NitroBugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NitroBugg View Post
    Fantastic tutorial for for setting up a rig! I will try these settings on my Ultimate and see how it does. Don't race, but I have access to an indoor dirt track. So far, I've only adjusted the preload rings some, and it runs pretty good as is. Everything else on it "out of the box stock".
    Will move the rest of my reply to a new thread as this is for racing.....

  7. #47
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #8 Theory: what, where, and how?

    I think it's useful at this part to talk about the vehicle and breaking it down into different parts of what it's doing. The next step in tuning is to understand what it is the truck is doing, and then thinking about what you want it to do differently. We're fine-tuning at this point, and are going to use different tools to affect what the truck is doing, depending on what part of the track we need to get better and what we are looking for.

    For me, I like to break it down primarily in the corners. Your truck is also going to be going down the straights, jumping, flying, and landing, but those are relatively easy to fix. The corners are where you are going to make up most of your time, so I think it's important to focus on that.

    Corners can be broken down into corner entry, mid-corner, and corner exit. I think it's also useful to think about each wheel/tire in these different stages (or at least front/rear end, inside/outside wheels) so that we can focus on what they are doing and whether we are happy with them.

    The other thing, and this should be obvious but we might not naturally be thinking of this, is that the front and rear wheels serve a different purpose. The front wheels steer (and provide forward thrust) and the rears provide forward thrust. Under braking, each wheel helps in slowing down the truck. Each wheel also provides traction in the middle of the corner to prevent the truck from sliding/flipping.

    Now that we have identified the place (entry, mid, exit), the item (front or rear wheels), the last thing is what is it doing that we are trying to fix. It's generally either going to understeer (turns less than we want it to), oversteer (turns more than we want it to), or it traction rolls.

    When you understeer, this can either be caused by the front wheels sliding, or the rear wheels pushing more than the front wheels are steering (more common on corner exit when the front wheels unload). When you oversteer, this can either be caused by the rear wheels sliding (rear doesn't have enough traction) or one of the rear wheels unloads (and so only one rear wheel is driving forward and the other one is diffing out).

    Traction rolling is basically when your truck flips over its wheels, basically because it has more traction than is able to contain the weight transfer to the outside, and the truck pivots over its wheel(s).

    So when looking to fix the truck, and you want some help, the 3 most important things to call out are is where this is happening, what is it doing (oversteer/understeer/traction roll), and how it is doing it (front/rear end)?

    This requires paying attention to the truck, and thinking critically about what you are seeing/feeling. You can't fix a problem until you've more specifically identified what the problem is.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  8. #48
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    We've only been to the track before we got the truck. But, I fully understand what to.look for. This is very well written just like your other topics.

  9. #49
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #9 Theory: traction and weight transfer

    So the tuning focus initially is going to be on traction. You can also tune for other things (responsiveness, predictability), but for the most part, if you have a truck that doesn't understeer, oversteer, or traction roll in any part of the driving, then you're going to have a truck that drives pretty dang good. It's going to be balanced in all phases of driving, which will make it easy to drive, and easy to drive at the limit.

    Proper tire setup (tread pattern, compound, foam selection/tuning, saucing) is going to have the biggest affect on traction, but ignoring that for now, let's talk about what else we are going to look for.

    Your truck is not a static vehicle, it is moving, transferring weight, pitching, rolling and basically always in motion. In addition to where it is on the track (important in of itself), it's going to be transferring weight to one wheel or another, pretty much all of the time!

    Traction will increase on the tire the weight is transferring to (there's math equations for this), up to a certain point and then it will either slide or roll over.

    Now obviously under braking, weight transfers to the front tires (and away from the rear). Acceleration is the opposite (weight transfer from front to rear). In the corners, weight transfers to the outside tires. So it's going to be pitching front/back, and rolling side to side.

    Your truck is going to have a certain amount of traction on each tire at each phase of driving (braking, cornering, acceleration), and it's probably not going to be balanced. For instance, mid-corner your front tires may have more traction than the rear, and it oversteers. Or under heavy braking, the rear gets heavily unloaded but the front has tons of traction -- the rear will tend to be unstable and swing out and your truck will spin out.

    So the primary goal at this point is to get the truck to act pretty balanced at all phases. Under heavy braking/corner entry, you want the truck to have enough weight transfer to the front to help you brake hard, and steer. You don't want so much that the rear end breaks loose and swings out. Mid corner, you want enough weight transfer/roll to the outside so that you can go around the corner, and you want it pretty balanced front outside and rear outside tires so that it doesn't understeer or oversteer. Finally, under acceleration, you want some weight transfer to the rear so that it bites in hard and accelerates hard, but not so much that your front wheels unweight and don't steer, causing you to understeer.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  10. #50
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #10 Theory: traction and contact patch/camber

    In addition to weight transfer, the other thing that will change while driving is the contact patch. While pitching and rolling, your tires are going to change angle in relation to the ground. There is an optimal angle (camber) the tires should be to the ground. For braking/acceleration, this is going to be pretty much flat to the ground. For cornering, some kind of negative camber at max roll is going to be ideal. Just like with a bicycle, when you go around a corner, you need the wheels to be at an angle to the ground for maximum traction -- they're not going to be straight up and down.

    Camber links affect this angle. You're going to have a static camber (we set it to -1 degrees as mentioned earlier when the truck is at rest), and then a dynamic camber which will change when the truck dives/squats/rolls as the suspension compresses. The length of the camber link on the front and rear end affect this -- shorter makes it angle more when suspension compresses (more camber gain), longer keeps it more straight up and down (less camber gain).

    Unfortunately the truck camber links affect the suspension both when diving/squatting (when you want it to stay pretty flat) and when rolling in the corners (when you want it to gain camber), so you're going to have to tune to help one situation which will probably hurt the other.

    With 4WD, your forward acceleration is going to pretty good already, so I usually tune the length of the camber links for cornering. A video recording of your truck going around the track will help a lot in seeing what your actual dynamic camber is in the corners, when the suspension is compressed. If it's too much or too little, the tire is going to be at the wrong angle and you are going to lose a lot of traction on that wheel in the corners.

    This topic is a little hard to understand and visualize, just be aware that camber will change as the truck is moving around (pitching/rolling), which will affect your tire patch. And camber links adjust how much it changes.
    Last edited by RazorRC22; 06-05-2018 at 09:11 PM.
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  11. #51
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    I had to sneak over here to the 4x4 side, thanks for taking the time to share all this info! I hope you continue to share the knowledge!! I'll be reading in order to apply to 2x4 for now.
    MTFBWY

  12. #52
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #11 Theory: applying it

    OK, that was a lot of verbiage, and it probably sounds like I said a lot and didn't say a lot all at the same time. The goal is to try to provide kind of a preprogrammed guide so that someone who is a beginner can go step by step and build up a foundation of knowledge. Or if they don't have time to read the whole thing, they can start with the stuff that will have the biggest change and then apply it, and later on can read more and apply more.

    So hopefully we've driven the truck, identified some things we don't like about how it handles, and are ready to start changing things to make it better. The first thing to realize is that EVERYTHING you change will help in one way, and hurt in another. So tuning is a matter of trade-offs. But there is usually a sweet-spot where the truck is pretty dang good and within the tuning window of what we want. The other thing is that there are multiple ways to get an effect we want (say more on-power rear traction), and the trick is to identify which knob we want to turn to get that effect.

    The window of what we want is going to depend on a lot of things -- surface traction, weight, power, and driving ability. For example, on high traction, your truck does not need much weight transfer to generate the traction since the track is already so sticky. A too light truck will naturally transfer less weight, but will also have less traction overall (not really a problem with the Slash 4x4). More power will mean your truck squats a LOT and pitches forward a lot under braking and will mean it needs to be stiffer overall just to counteract that much weight transfer.

    So now onto fixing things: we're going to be messing with traction first, and correcting oversteer/understeer is the biggest thing people complain about. For understeer, there are two ways to fix this: either add more traction to the front, or take away traction from the rear. For oversteer, the same thing -- you can take away traction from the front or add traction to the rear.

    I prefer to always try to add traction to the end that is sliding first, until I can't anymore, and then maybe take away some traction from the other end. It's possible to have too much traction for the truck (carpet, astroturf, HCG chassis on pavement, etc.), but let's skip that for now.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  13. #53
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    #12 Corner entry

    OK, let's get onto some fun stuff. For corner entry, let's say we're coming down the front straight, need to brake hard, and enter a 90 degree corner. Weight transfers from rear to front. With 4WD, all four wheels will be contributing to braking, but the fronts more than the rears.

    If we feel like the rear end is getting too light under braking (rear gets nervous, maybe swings out, truck is unstable), there's some things we can do to fix it.

    Stiffer front shocks:
    Stiffer springs, thicker oil, moving shocks to outer position top and bottom will make the front end stiffer and allow less weight transfer. On the downside, you will lose compliance over bumps everywhere else, and you will also affect how much weight transfers in the corners (from inside to outside).

    Less rear droop:
    The amount the rear shocks can extend will also affect how much weight transfers to the front. Unless you are doing full endos/stoppies on the front wheels, the truck can only rise so much in the rear, depending on how much the rear shocks extend. So removing droop will allow the rear to rise less, which will cause less weight transfer. Downsides to removing droop are that the shocks don't extend as far, which means your truck is going to land less plush and may bottom out on jumps.

    Electronics
    You can turn down the brake EPA on your radio to make the truck more controllable under braking by limiting how hard you can brake. On more advanced ESCs, you can also turn down drag brake, which is the "coasting" amount of braking your truck does. Some ESCs also allow you to tune how much initial braking and the brake curve as you push the brake trigger.

    More advanced platforms can also use front kickup/caster/rear anti-squat to affect how fast and how much weight transfers to the front, but the Slash doesn't have this.

    Finally, if you have the opposite problem (not enough weight transfer), you can obviously do the opposite of these suggestions to get more weight transfer. Symptoms of this would be that the front doesn't dive at all under hard braking, and the truck tends to either push/understeer or 4 wheel slide/drift under heavy braking. To get more front end traction, you also should make sure your front camber links aren't too short, which would make the front wheels camber in too much and not be flat to the ground.

    So now you got your front wheels partially loaded to heavily loaded at this point and you can brake hard. This weight transfer also helps the front wheels initiate steering into the corner which is a good thing. Once again, if your rear end breaks loose when you initiate steering, you may have too much weight transfer. Or if the truck plows, you may not have enough.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  14. #54
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    Like I've already said Razor, this thread is great! I decided to buy a TLR 10-SCTE 4x4 3.0 instead of a sl4sh for racing, so I will be using this thread for my Losi!
    $+RC+more$+friends+more$=FUN!
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  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvHexRC View Post
    Like I've already said Razor, this thread is great! I decided to buy a TLR 10-SCTE 4x4 3.0 instead of a sl4sh for racing, so I will be using this thread for my Losi!
    Since you bought a Losi, check out the Losi 3.0 forum on RCTech for tuning. Losi and Slash are two completely different trucks.

    Sent from my VS985 4G using Tapatalk

  16. #56
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    Razor,

    I just got back into RC's after owning an E-MAXX for bashing for several years. Thought I'd try racing and I chose the Slash 4x4 because of my familiarity with Traxxas RCs. I have spent the last 2 months Googling tips for the Slash but I never had this forum as a hit. I'm glad I found it though! Thanks for all of the great tips!

    I'll report back after a few club races.
    JES

  17. #57
    RC Qualifier NitroBugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    No, they work fine.
    Just ran into this a few minutes ago....and they mounted fine on the rear, and the shocks on the front.

    I guess if you trusted standoffs....you "could" put both on the front, although the screws would get a pounding. I see nothing wrong with them on the back. Functions the same. Would go with you on this too.

  18. #58
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesdoit View Post
    Razor,

    I just got back into RC's after owning an E-MAXX for bashing for several years. Thought I'd try racing and I chose the Slash 4x4 because of my familiarity with Traxxas RCs. I have spent the last 2 months Googling tips for the Slash but I never had this forum as a hit. I'm glad I found it though! Thanks for all of the great tips!

    I'll report back after a few club races.
    You're welcome, good luck with the truck. Feel free to ask any questions in this thread.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  19. #59
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    hello Razor,
    great thread! I love the way that "facts never lies"...!

    Rear shock tower got five holes to tune camber link position; front got four! Which hole do You use when the rear shock tower is on the front, cause there and effect on wheel travel path. it seems to me that's holes placement are slighly different between the front and the rear tower

    Do you use the same set up for rough hard pack surface? Tell us about your tires choice in that case

    thank's

  20. #60
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plf View Post
    hello Razor,
    great thread! I love the way that "facts never lies"...!

    Rear shock tower got five holes to tune camber link position; front got four! Which hole do You use when the rear shock tower is on the front, cause there and effect on wheel travel path. it seems to me that's holes placement are slighly different between the front and the rear tower

    Do you use the same set up for rough hard pack surface? Tell us about your tires choice in that case

    thank's
    There's a setup sheet earlier in the thread. I used the same setup for a rough surface, but with one rate softer springs.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  21. #61
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    Update on my astroturf SSC8 LCG setup with Team Durango DESC410 springs. Fit bolt-on to stock GTR shocks. 23mm ride height front and rear minimum.

    Best lap time on our astroturf track now 16.5s with my SSC8.
    Losi SCTE 17.3s and Durango Desc410 17.2s.



    Last edited by VulvoS40T4; 06-19-2018 at 11:11 AM.

  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    You're welcome, good luck with the truck. Feel free to ask any questions in this thread.
    Actually I do: You noted earlier to eliminate the servo saver; how do you do that again? I did it for my E-MAXX but it's long gone! I don't have the LCG chassis yet but it's coming...Thanks!
    JES

  23. #63
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Sorry, I didn’t eliminate the servo saver, I just used the STRC steering rack which uses a super stiff one.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  24. #64
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    ������������ Awesome thread brotha. I registered and subscribed. Just getting my “backslash” conversion ready for the outdoor track and you dropped a bunch of useful knowledge!!!

  25. #65
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    If you want to race your Slash 4x4, grab a coffee, tea or whatever bevie you sip on when reading because my feedback is somewhat long…

    First off, thank you Razor for this thread!

    As I mentioned above (#56), Google pointed me everywhere else but here! I tried lots of those tips that I found on the internet at various places but the ones that work, are the ones on Razor’s setup. In the end, I did most of his setup with the exceptions of the following:

    -I have Pro Line Caliber tires.
    -I put GTR shock springs (7449 front; 7447 rear).
    -I put 30wt oil in all 4 shocks.

    Here’s my story with lots of great tips:

    First off, I made the “mistake” of buying the Slash 4x4 model 68086-4 as the Platinum model did not come with a transmitter or receiver (plus I had to paint the body and was not ready for that). In hind sight, the Platinum model is the way to start.

    I practiced with it “as-is” and burnt 2 servos! (Thank you Traxxas for the replacements). I heard the servo humming as the steering mechanism would bind on something in one direction; this makes the servo work hard and burn out! Someone at my local hobby store told me to set my steering end points to just before it binds, and I did, and it’s been fine since! (I had no clue what "steering end point" was!)

    Lesson 1: Set your steering end points.

    I also inquired on how a typical race went and I'm glad I did! There's practice time, two qualifiers, A B-final and the winner of that goes to the A-final. There was also no power available on site. Since I did not have a generator nor did not want to buy one, I got four 5000 mAh lipos anticipating not to charge them and not making the A-final.

    Lesson 2: Know the race-day regime and prepare for it.

    With the servo issue resolved, I raced my Slash “as-is” and although I did ok in the B-Main, it slid everywhere on the clay track, did not take jumps well and just did not handle properly. I am a rookie at rc racing, but with many years of bashing under my belt, I should not have struggled as I did. Disappointed with the race results, I got better tires and a center diff.

    With these latest 2 upgrades, and lots of practice, my next race went very well… until 2 minutes do go in the second qualifier: I blew the bearing that mates the center diff. to the chassis. Luckily, I had my Stampede with me so I stole its slipper clutch and bearing for the final. The final did not go good as I wasn’t used to how it handled with a slipper clutch.

    Lesson 3: Get tires that most people race with on the specific track.
    Lesson 4: Install a center diff.
    Lesson 5: Practice, practice, practice! I used to coach running and my motto was to “practice perfect”; make efficient use of the practice time to train correctly. Same goes for rc practicing: if you always crash on turn 3 and don’t rectify it, you are practicing how to crash! As I’ve read in countless places on the ‘net: practice slow, keeping it on the track then once comfortable, go faster a little at a time.
    Lesson 6: Change the bearing 5119A at the center diff. just BEFORE your next race and before every race. I’ve read that it was prone to blowing, so it’s an easy ~$5 preventative measure.
    Lesson 7: Have spare parts of what you’ve blown on hand. From my bashing days I would upgrade parts for the sake of upgrading but to be a budget smart racer: replace what you break and also buy a spare (within reason).

    So I ordered a replacement center diff. and per Razor's comment #2, I decided to get the LCG conversion, the GTR shocks (rear shocks front & back as noted many places), so a rear shock tower in front and sway bar kit and planned to put it in all on at once. It was overwhelming when everything came in, but I wanted to race better! So I installed the LCG kit, the center diff., the sway bars (front & rear), GTR shocks at the back and tackled the "long shocks on the front trick". Well this did not go well! The front sway bars no longer fit, the shocks were rubbing on the camber links, the steering was way out of whack! So I put the front shock tower back on with the long shocks. The front was slightly higher than the rear, but man! I wanted to practice!

    I practiced a bit on the track with this setup and it actually ran better than before! It looked goofy with the front higher but it ran well; however, I noticed that it did not turn well in one direction; and wouldn't you know it! The question was posted several times: why does the lcg conversion bind when turning in one direction? I saw one person's comment to Dremmel out the chassis to make it work! What? That's a reinforced structural component; no! I never found an answer anywhere online. I finally figured it out: just shorten the assembly that is connected to the servo horn. Two turns per each end of the rod worked for me! Any shorter and you will rub against the drive shaft on the other end!

    Lesson 8: When posting online, please close the thread with a solution!!!

    In the meantime I got the normal GTR front shocks and put those on. Man! What a disappointment at the track! I sure missed the longer front travel! And to add insult to injury, I burnt the stock 3500 Velineon motor! We're in a heat wave right now, so it was no surprise. I got a new motor, motor fan, a fan for the ESC and put all of those on.

    Lesson 9: Install fans on the motor and esc.

    Proud of successfully troubleshooting the steering issue, I decided to re-try the rear-shocks-on-the-front setup. I know Razor has a link above (#31) but with no step by step instructions, it gets frustrating! Then I noticed the camber links were mounted on the BACK of the tower and the other end looked to be rotated 180 deg. I also read somewhere that you have to shorten the body posts AND drill new holes on the body. Plus I have a hole in the hood for the timing chip so I had to make this bigger too! You will also need two 3x25mm button head screws and a spacer to mount the top of the shocks. In the end, I got it, on Friday, at midnight! I practiced on the track Saturday morning and satisfied with the results, drove 3 hrs. for a race with a 5pm start.

    Lesson 10: It takes lots of time to do lots of tweaks!
    Lesson 11: Practice with your new tweaks before racing it.

    This was my first time at this track. I did some practice laps and felt confident and the truck handled well! We were only 9 in the SC4x4 category so we all raced together. I did my best race in the third qualifier. I was lined up 6th in the final and finished 5th! However, the final was my poorest race so far. On my drive home I thought about it, I attributed the poor showing in the final to my poor eyesight seeing how it was 10pm for the final and I do not do well in the dark (even if there was track lighting).

    After thoroughly cleaning my rc I was back at the track the following Wednesday. What a mess! It turns out that the throttle would stay on, up to 3 secs., after I let go of the trigger. No wonder it went wrong in the final! I missed the cue for most jumps and turns! I reset the transmitter and it seems to work good now.

    My last tweaks were to put in 30 wt oil in all 4 shocks as I had a 40/35 setup. It runs great now! I can't wait to race again!

    I know my story is long (I warned you), so I cut out way more other details but mentioned the important ones in hopes that it helps someone else. As noted at the start, my setup is per Razor's sheet (except the 3 items noted) and the rig drives very well!

    So, if you plan to race your Slash 4x4, the setup is listed in this thread. It is not an outdated setup and it is not based on comments like "in my opinion...", "I do not race but...", "I'm a basher and this is what I do...". It is tried and tested.

    Some last comments:

    -Yes, the start up cost to race an rc is high but if you take care of your vehicle, it should get cheaper.
    -I noticed kids bashing in between races and wrecking their cars! Their parent did not understand why it cost so much to repair! When at a track for a day of racing: race, clean, maintain, repeat.
    -At our first race I noticed that I went to school with the Top Gun. I said hi and that I was new to the hobby. He said "stick with it. It won't be easy at first. If you were given a dirt bike, you wouldn't expect to be at the front with the others and same goes with rc racing."
    -Another Top Gun stated "a clean rc is a happy rc". So true!

    So enjoy your Slash for what it is. We do not race for millions. Enjoy the journey!
    JES

  26. #66
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    Great post dude! Enjoyed the read. Thanks for taking the time to share.

  27. #67
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesdoit View Post
    So enjoy your Slash for what it is. We do not race for millions. Enjoy the journey!
    Awesome, great read! Totally agree with enjoying the journey, that's what it's about at the end of the day. Some people get mad if they're not winning, but it's the enjoyment of racing with your friends and having fun that matters. Glad my setup helped get your Slash working better!
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  28. #68
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    Quick question about center diff. I've enjoyed and learned a lot from this thread. I just finished installing the 100 K Center diff glue LOL. Seems thick but I have nothing to compare it to. But theoretically I can understand why you would want it thick. Upon first reassembly, I snugged up the screws. And was unable to turn the input shaft. Do you just snug up the screws until it spins freely?

  29. #69
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    Follow up, so I was about to move onto F/R diffs. I was thinking about the center. I pulled out the shims. There were 2 on drive shaft side and 1 on the pinion side. Screws snugged up it turns fairly freely. Fingers are kinda sore from holding driveshaft slip joint,lol. Is this correct,now?

    * The PO has been in there b4. There were pieces of a prior gasket,or should there be 2 gaskets?
    Last edited by Workingstiff; 07-17-2018 at 04:10 AM. Reason: Info added

  30. #70
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    Great write up. I race a variety of the known race brands, currently running an Ultima RB6.6 in 17.5T class and USVTA onroad. I am a mid pack B/C main guy at best who races once or twice a month but has fun. I have a strange desire to try and run a Slash 4x4 LCG on black carpet races where I run 17.5T buggy. This may have just inspired me, I suspect like all my cars on black carpet, traction roiling will be the challenge.

  31. #71
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Workingstiff View Post
    Follow up, so I was about to move onto F/R diffs. I was thinking about the center. I pulled out the shims. There were 2 on drive shaft side and 1 on the pinion side. Screws snugged up it turns fairly freely. Fingers are kinda sore from holding driveshaft slip joint,lol. Is this correct,now?

    * The PO has been in there b4. There were pieces of a prior gasket,or should there be 2 gaskets?
    Are you talking about the thin complicated rubber gasket that the screws go through? Should only be one, and it sits in the plastic diff cup IIRC. This is basically how I build my diffs (different car), and it makes sure your gears are lined up:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNjp1KoZfb8
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  32. #72
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCMaverick View Post
    Great write up. I race a variety of the known race brands, currently running an Ultima RB6.6 in 17.5T class and USVTA onroad. I am a mid pack B/C main guy at best who races once or twice a month but has fun. I have a strange desire to try and run a Slash 4x4 LCG on black carpet races where I run 17.5T buggy. This may have just inspired me, I suspect like all my cars on black carpet, traction roiling will be the challenge.
    Thanks! I've driven on carpet once, but yeah managing traction rolling is probably the key. I would guess you need to add a front swaybar and go up to a thicker swaybar in the rear. Probably will want to run the regular front shocks on the front so you can still use a swaybar and you won't need as much droop anyway.

    My best guess is you just go stiffer on all springs and swaybars and thicker on all fluids one rate to start. Maybe drop ride height a couple of mm and droop a few mm.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  33. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    Are you talking about the thin complicated rubber gasket that the screws go through? Should only be one, and it sits in the plastic diff cup IIRC. This is basically how I build my diffs (different car), and it makes sure your gears are lined up:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNjp1KoZfb8
    Can you explain "make sure the gears line up",please?


    Yep, the thin black gasket that the screws go through. There were large pieces in place under a good reusable gasket. The o rings receded nicely without any shims and washers. The only thing that I felt may have required any attention to detail, was the little Shaft or pin that carries the side gears. There are two metal tabs that hold the same place having slight bevels on them. Iirc, I put the bevel or the taper to the outside of the assembly. There were also notches on this tab and I don't remember how I installed that accept that I put it back as I found it. I guess I'm out in search of exploded views of Center diff. The most bothersome thing, is this doesn't feel smooth you can feel it notching.
    Last edited by Workingstiff; 07-18-2018 at 05:28 AM. Reason: Added the rest of the story....

  34. #74
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Workingstiff View Post
    Can you explain "make sure the gears line up",please?


    Yep, the thin black gasket that the screws go through. There were large pieces in place under a good reusable gasket. The o rings receded nicely without any shims and washers. The only thing that I felt may have required any attention to detail, was the little Shaft or pin that carries the side gears. There are two metal tabs that hold the same place having slight bevels on them. Iirc, I put the bevel or the taper to the outside of the assembly. There were also notches on this tab and I don't remember how I installed that accept that I put it back as I found it. I guess I'm out in search of exploded views of Center diff. The most bothersome thing, is this doesn't feel smooth you can feel it notching.
    For "lining up", I meant that sometimes when you put the top back on and screw it down, the outdrive gears don't mesh into the side gears (spider gears) and the teeth hit each other rather than slide in between each other. So it makes it hard to tighten the metal ring gear down.

    Definitely find a drawing, they're out there and it should be easy to figure out where it's notching. IIRC, the beveled sides of the metal tab pin holders should be facing inward, but a drawing will show it.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  35. #75
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    My bad,the rubber gasket became unseated and was destroyed. New rebuild kit,solved my heart aches. Thanks

    To clarify-- bevels face outwards,flush flat surface face the gears. Did ya know, some of these parts come with instructions,?lol
    Last edited by Workingstiff; 07-19-2018 at 02:27 AM.

  36. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Workingstiff View Post
    My bad,the rubber gasket became unseated and was destroyed. New rebuild kit,solved my heart aches. Thanks

    To clarify-- bevels face outwards,flush flat surface face the gears. Did ya know, some of these parts come with instructions,?lol
    ...I just stumbled on this: https://traxxas.com/explodedviews/Sl...Assembly-6804R
    Included here for future reference in case you misplace your paper copy.
    JES

  37. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    No, they work fine.
    Razor,

    I mounted the towers backwards, and all was fine as you said (that is except my OCD). I removed the Front mounted rear towers, dremeled a very small portion of the tower and mounted them forward. My OCD is happy and the camber links mount on the front like before. Thanks again for the help, I have been using some of your setup and notice that even with the ridiculously floppy tires, the truck corners better than before.



  38. #78
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    Gotta say I love the fact that you took the time to put together this thread! I have several years racing experience with my 2wd Slash but absolutely zero with my 4wd that Iím going to race for the first time this Sunday. This thread has been incredibly helpful in setting up my 4wd.
    Thanks again and Thanks to all those that have contributed!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  39. #79
    RC Champion RazorRC22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trajan View Post
    I mounted the towers backwards, and all was fine as you said (that is except my OCD). I removed the Front mounted rear towers, dremeled a very small portion of the tower and mounted them forward. My OCD is happy and the camber links mount on the front like before. Thanks again for the help, I have been using some of your setup and notice that even with the ridiculously floppy tires, the truck corners better than before.
    Looks good!

    Quote Originally Posted by chopperguy View Post
    Gotta say I love the fact that you took the time to put together this thread! I have several years racing experience with my 2wd Slash but absolutely zero with my 4wd that I’m going to race for the first time this Sunday. This thread has been incredibly helpful in setting up my 4wd.
    Thanks again and Thanks to all those that have contributed!
    Cool, let us know how it goes! I also have a long playlist on my Slash 2WD race build if you haven't seen that already. I don't have a setup sheet for it, probably should do one sometime.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  40. #80
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    Loved this set-up on the track, I donít think I will change a thing. Won every heat race as well as the main. The track was very fast and in great condition. Iíve always loved my 2wd on this track and have beaten many of the 4wd. A lot of fun to run apples against apples!


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