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  1. #41
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    I would imagine racing on a track with a less manicured surface that a softer more luxurious ride would be preferred.
    I run at the park on an imaginary track lol. After burning my third pack with the new STRC front shock tower, which provides a little extra droop. I've gotta say I love extra droop in the front I'm getting!
    I measured it at around an inch of droop, with the Losi Blue springs on Bigbore shocks and the inside lower shock mount with no pre-load spacer. It doesn't seem to be traction-rolling any worse; a good thing.
    With all that weight in the rearend and keeping it low tinthe ground...this seems to be what keeps the truck upright.

  2. #42
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    ...and if we're splitting hairs, the wheels will actually go up past the point the front end bottoms out with a stock shock tower. The STRC tower allows you to convert that into a bit more droop. I dig.

  3. #43
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    What does your truck cycle up front? Longer shocks, Slash rears to get more stroke, is the ticket. The stock tower is engineered to get a lot of chassis slap from a variety of angles to save the bulkhead and arms. Hopefully it will flex and not break. That said, it will come to the point of one or two scenarios. Tie rod location at the bell cranks has to change because of bump steer, and/ or you can't get enough articulation out of the rod ends, which is my problem now. 3" cycling up front is all you're gonna get without being creative with the steering somehow. I'll have to build a long travel kit for my Slash, I think I can easily pull 3-1/2" out back and the 3" up front. Maybe this weekend.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    What does your truck cycle up front? Longer shocks, Slash rears to get more stroke, is the ticket. The stock tower is engineered to get a lot of chassis slap from a variety of angles to save the bulkhead and arms. Hopefully it will flex and not break. That said, it will come to the point of one or two scenarios. Tie rod location at the bell cranks has to change because of bump steer, and/ or you can't get enough articulation out of the rod ends, which is my problem now. 3" cycling up front is all you're gonna get without being creative with the steering somehow. I'll have to build a long travel kit for my Slash, I think I can easily pull 3-1/2" out back and the 3" up front. Maybe this weekend.
    Any updates?

  5. #45
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bashnslash View Post
    Any updates?
    Sorry, I was a slacker. Busy work day Saturday. However, I did take my scrach build car (2wd) out ROCK CRAWLING. Oh what a riot, it crawled quite well and I didn't break any transmission stuff. If I could figure out how to link Youtube clips together again, I'd post the video. After the crawl session it was full ramming speed on some motorcycle tracks. All went well until I lost the drivers front inner bearing, ending my day as a 3 wheeler.

    I'll make arms like I have for my Bomber I'm doing. Gets the cg low, arms are a litlle heavy, are out of the way of the u-joints and don't bend or break. Slash rear shocks up front and Yeti rears out back. Should do a cage for it while I'm at it. Bolt on deal.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Sorry, I was a slacker. Busy work day Saturday. However, I did take my scrach build car (2wd) out ROCK CRAWLING. Oh what a riot, it crawled quite well and I didn't break any transmission stuff. If I could figure out how to link Youtube clips together again, I'd post the video. After the crawl session it was full ramming speed on some motorcycle tracks. All went well until I lost the drivers front inner bearing, ending my day as a 3 wheeler.

    I'll make arms like I have for my Bomber I'm doing. Gets the cg low, arms are a litlle heavy, are out of the way of the u-joints and don't bend or break. Slash rear shocks up front and Yeti rears out back. Should do a cage for it while I'm at it. Bolt on deal.
    Good times...Slash crawler lol that sounds interesting for sure! With a bunch of suspection travel it bet it crawls respectably for a 2wd!

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Sorry, I was a slacker. Busy work day Saturday. However, I did take my scrach build car (2wd) out ROCK CRAWLING. Oh what a riot, it crawled quite well and I didn't break any transmission stuff. If I could figure out how to link Youtube clips together again, I'd post the video. After the crawl session it was full ramming speed on some motorcycle tracks. All went well until I lost the drivers front inner bearing, ending my day as a 3 wheeler.

    I'll make arms like I have for my Bomber I'm doing. Gets the cg low, arms are a litlle heavy, are out of the way of the u-joints and don't bend or break. Slash rear shocks up front and Yeti rears out back. Should do a cage for it while I'm at it. Bolt on deal.
    What tires do you have on the slash you took rock crawling?

  8. #48
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gru734 View Post
    What tires do you have on the slash you took rock crawling?
    SCORE TT BFG kr2s/Method wheels. Great tire/wheel combo, 4-3/4" tall, probably too tall with a truck body.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    You are spot on.

    I’m running my “other brand” short course at a local super rough basher track, and am going for a similar suspension package. Super soft springs, lots of droop front and rear and lighter shock fluid is the plan.
    Just as a followup, I’ve found long shocks, soft springs (I’m actually running rear springs in the front of my off-brand truck), and light shock oil to work quite well. I also find linear springs to work better (such as Losi springs) than progressive springs because they are nice and soft trough the whole stroke.

    The progressive springs ramp up in stiffness pretty quickly, which is what you DON’T want.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  10. #50
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RazorRC22 View Post
    Just as a followup, Iíve found long shocks, soft springs (Iím actually running rear springs in the front of my off-brand truck), and light shock oil to work quite well. I also find linear springs to work better (such as Losi springs) than progressive springs because they are nice and soft trough the whole stroke.

    The progressive springs ramp up in stiffness pretty quickly, which is what you DONíT want.
    If your shocks are perpindicular to the arms at full bump (how they are supposed to be), that makes your linear spring work progressively, where progressive springs will make your rig "buck" on the rebound. I run 30 wt up front, std 3 hole pistons and 25 wt in the rear with bypass pistons for quicker rebound for my application to work. Without them, the rear would pack. Video changes as you tune, you will be surprised at what you really see compared to the "naked eye".

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    If your shocks are perpindicular to the arms at full bump (how they are supposed to be), that makes your linear spring work progressively, where progressive springs will make your rig "buck" on the rebound. I run 30 wt up front, std 3 hole pistons and 25 wt in the rear with bypass pistons for quicker rebound for my application to work. Without them, the rear would pack.
    I'm still dialing in the shock fluid and piston hole diameter, but this is exactly what I do with the GTR's I have on the rearend.
    Good stuff guys.

  12. #52
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    what are "bypass pistons"? /\

  13. #53
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gru734 View Post
    what are "bypass pistons"? /\
    Easiest way to explain is this: Put a flexible material on top of the shock piston and your compression is firmer than rebound because the flexible "flap" allows the shock oil to blow thru the piston, when it couldn't going up (compression) depending on how many holes are blocked off. Put it on the bottom, compression is fast, rebound is slow.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gru734 View Post
    what are "bypass pistons"? /\
    What he ^^^ ^^^ said.


    https://m.traxxas.com/products/parts/5461

  15. #55
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Ok, I'll proof read to be sure my auto fill doesn't go buck wild!!!

    The concept for bypass pistons is to change the metering of the shock oil going through the piston. Stock is 50/50, equal valving. You can buy (forget who did them) or do your own. In a nutshell, you have a flexible material on the top of your piston, covering as many holes as you need to change the dampening rate, I'll call it the "percentage". Covering the top blocks the compression holes, making your shock think it has heavier oil for the compression side of things, thus slowing it down. On rebound, the oil blows right through speeding up rebound (all the holes in the piston are open with the "flap" out of the way. Cover the bottom side of the piston and it does the opposite, fast compression and slow rebound. Changing the size of some piston holes..... it never ends.
    That make more sense this time???

  16. #56
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    How do you make them?

  17. #57
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Cut some circles out of a plyable plastic sheet that are a bit smaller than the shock piston, like those page protectors you would use in a 3 ring binder for example. If you have a punch that is the correct diameter, use that, easier and faster. Mount either above or below, depending on what your "tune" needs to be. Trim as necessary to uncover the piston's holes. You have to have at least one hole uncovered. You can take a 2 hole piston, drill out the piston holes to change the metering, you can add smaller holes...... Time behind the wheel and video footage will prove or disprove that you are tuning in the right direction. I wish I could directly embed videos on here, not links, and I could show you exactly what I'm talking about. The potential down side is it allows you to fine tune to a specific terrain to where it runs flawlessly, like the whoop sections stuff. The problem is now you want to go "send it" and it will probably nose dive badly unless you keep it pinned, and the truck takes a real beating because the suspension is too soft. I will have to say that blazing through the whoops and roller jumps is by far the most fun for me. The real bottom line is that there is no replacement for wheel travel. You can trim the front bulkhead and run OEM Jato arms, camber links and tie rods along with Slash rear shocks up front and the STOCK PLASTIC SHOCK TOWER, that is mandatory. Aluminum caps on plastic shocks works flawlessly. Just like this one below. Do what you can to get 3" out back to compliment the front. Go blaze the whoops!!

    20170824_074632 by MAC FAB, on Flickr

  18. #58
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    20180114_155439 by MAC FAB, on Flickr

    See this "front" arm. When I find the time I will build something like this for the rear of my Slash. Drive line clears the arm and this one cycles 4", so getting at least 3-1/2" on my Slash should prove to be a relatively easy task.

  19. #59
    RC Champion shack351's Avatar
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    Wow! Your name says it all! I like all the fab but just wondering... can the axles handle that angle under load? Anyway around it... nice work brother!

    -Shack

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Cut some circles out of a plyable plastic sheet that are a bit smaller than the shock piston, like those page protectors you would use in a 3 ring binder for example. If you have a punch that is the correct diameter, use that, easier and faster. Mount either above or below, depending on what your "tune" needs to be. Trim as necessary to uncover the piston's holes. You have to have at least one hole uncovered. You can take a 2 hole piston, drill out the piston holes to change the metering, you can add smaller holes...... Time behind the wheel and video footage will prove or disprove that you are tuning in the right direction. I wish I could directly embed videos on here, not links, and I could show you exactly what I'm talking about. The potential down side is it allows you to fine tune to a specific terrain to where it runs flawlessly, like the whoop sections stuff. The problem is now you want to go "send it" and it will probably nose dive badly unless you keep it pinned, and the truck takes a real beating because the suspension is too soft. I will have to say that blazing through the whoops and roller jumps is by far the most fun for me. The real bottom line is that there is no replacement for wheel travel. You can trim the front bulkhead and run OEM Jato arms, camber links and tie rods along with Slash rear shocks up front and the STOCK PLASTIC SHOCK TOWER, that is mandatory. Aluminum caps on plastic shocks works flawlessly. Just like this one below. Do what you can to get 3" out back to compliment the front. Go blaze the whoops!!

    20170824_074632 by MAC FAB, on Flickr
    My goal is get as much travel as possible while still useing mostly stock parts. I did recently order some aluminum A arms, because they had more holes to mount the shocks to than the stock ones.

  21. #61
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    just wondering... can the axles handle that angle under load? Anyway around it... nice work brother!
    -Shack

    The car in the background gets about a years worth of hard thrashing, and its just about 45 degrees. This one here will probably have to lose 1/4" travel (making it 3-3/4") getting it back closer to 40 degrees so the steering doesn't have issues at full droop/lock under hard load. However, I'll try it first as is. The ride height for both is mid travel on the suspension, not as a stink bug, so they live longer than you would think, but I still consider them a "consumable" part and carry spares. I would love MIPs, but you only get ~30 degrees out of them.

  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    20180114_155439 by MAC FAB, on Flickr

    See this "front" arm. When I find the time I will build something like this for the rear of my Slash. Drive line clears the arm and this one cycles 4", so getting at least 3-1/2" on my Slash should prove to be a relatively easy task.
    Wow, so cool! My slash is now getting a whopping 2 1/4 plus inches of travel with my new STRC front shock tower!! It beats stock but is laughable compared to your rigs.
    Watched a few of your vids on your YouTube channel. Good stuff!
    You're in desert racer country for sure. At least compared to me. I deal with more smaller broken branches, dirt/grass mix.
    I get some decent grip sometimes, when the dirt is moist. I'm thinking I'd be traction-rolling a lot more with that kind of travel?
    Anyway, great stuff MAC!

  23. #63
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Everything I build is long travel, 3"+ in the front and 4" or more in the back. They are only good for the desert racing environment. They body roll on sharp turns, nose dive at the track. So unless this is what /where you like to drive, you may not want to do it. My Slash is so stiff up front now that it jumps like Superman, great fun for the track. Totally useless where/what terrain I like to drive. The Slash can't keep up with the long travelers for very long. The one time I did run my buggy at the track I ran a camera on the roof. Oh boy, the body roll was off the chart. BUT I could smoke EVERY car down the whooped back stretch and into the first turns and rolling jumps. They would hand it to me everywhere else. So, if you're building a pre runner, go long and soft. If not, keep it closer to the track tune.

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