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  1. #1
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    Electric screwdriver and bits for RC?

    Hey guys,

    I need some advice. I'm looking for an electric screwdriver suited for RC. However, I'm very confused about this whole thing. Never done much tinkering, it's not my forte.

    Can I buy pretty much any power tool and then buy bits that fit for them? I know it can't be too powerful, I suppose I preferably should have one that I can set torque to a lower number?

    Anyway, anyone have some input here? Suggestions of power tools/bit-kits would be awesome

    (I know power tools often aren't recommended but I have some issues with my fine motor skills/shakes due to medical issues and as I've gone deeper and deeper into RC I start to really feel the effects of this. Trying to improve this is one of reasons I picked up the hobby.i)

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Drivers are very handy in this hobby, and an absolute wrist-saver when mounting up a set of beadlocks. The trick to using one is to be smarter than the tool. Any time you are running a screw into plastic it is a very good idea to stop with just a little bit of daylight between the screw head and the part it is going into, then do the rest by hand.

    With that, there are a bunch of handy drivers out there, I have the Skil iXO driver (bought it years ago) which has worked great. I also have the Ryobi Tek4 driver, which has also been very good. They both have their pluses and minuses, but they do their jobs very well.

    Skil Driver
    https://www.amazon.com/2354-01-Lithi.../dp/B0042ZZKL8

    Ryobi
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-TE...53LK/202351930

    One last thing, never trust the clutch.

    Lots of hex drivers out there, don't buy cheap... Likely the best set going are the MIP drivers.
    https://www.miponline.com/MIP-Speed-...and-2-5mm-9512

    They are spendy, but when you are digging a stripped screw out of your car you'll wish you'd paid a little extra for your tools (been there, done that).
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HelsRike View Post
    Hey guys,

    I need some advice. I'm looking for an electric screwdriver suited for RC. However, I'm very confused about this whole thing. Never done much tinkering, it's not my forte.

    Can I buy pretty much any power tool and then buy bits that fit for them? I know it can't be too powerful, I suppose I preferably should have one that I can set torque to a lower number?

    Anyway, anyone have some input here? Suggestions of power tools/bit-kits would be awesome

    (I know power tools often aren't recommended but I have some issues with my fine motor skills/shakes due to medical issues and as I've gone deeper and deeper into RC I start to really feel the effects of this. Trying to improve this is one of reasons I picked up the hobby.i)
    I got a rechargable driver from Lowes that I like very well. I think it's their Kobalt brand. It didn't come with metric bits though, got them through Ace Hardware.

    Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    RC Champion lektro's Avatar
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    I have worked with power tools most of my working life. I can tell you through experience and a lot of it. Buy your driver bits from Wiha tools. German made, hard and made to precision. You could also by a drill like you said, that you can change settings of how tight you want the screw. This way you have something to drill holes, which comes in handy.

    https://www.wihatools.com/bits/bit-sets

    Also what Greatscott said doing the last few threads by hand if you can. I would do the same with metal to metal. Less chance of stripping both plastic and the screw head.
    Last edited by lektro; 09-01-2018 at 03:17 PM.
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  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. O.G.'s Avatar
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    I have the skil derived mentioned above and it absolutely has saved my carpel tunnel hands. You can buy attachments to fit the screw heads and as I recall, most of the traxxas velineon screws use the same driver head. Just go slow on the final tightening.


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  6. #6
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    Currently I'm using a black and Decker driver from Wal-Mart. Does the job ok. Wish for a bit more speed, but again if your not careful to much speed can get away from you. I use mip bit drivers in it, love them.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advice everyone, starting to feel ready to place an order now

    Regarding how to use it safely, I was thinking the same, not going all the way down with the driver but tighten the rest by hand. Good to know that I shouldn't rely on the clutch though, very good tip I didn't know about

  8. #8
    RC Qualifier Traxxas9008's Avatar
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    This Thread is a Hand Saver! I've been doing it by hand since day one of owning these trucks and it is really hard on the hand. (Even tho I'm 16. lol) I've been looking for something to buy. Especially when taking apart the transmission. Those long screws take forever. lol.
    Anyway, Good idea for asking @HelsRike! This thread should help many new people joining the hobby.
    If you ain't getting dirty, you ain't having fun.

  9. #9
    RC Champion Dcuda69's Avatar
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    I have this one:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tacklife-SD...MAAOSwC19bB5wB

    it comes with some bits but I bought the MIPs to use with it. I like it..pretty fast but not overly powerful to strip threads or screw heads. Charges via USB
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  10. #10
    RC Champion lektro's Avatar
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    I know everyone must be a bit shy of battery operated drills. I have been using the same 18V Makita for 12 years. Even the same batteries. Having the driver/drill combo comes in very handy. I bet you can find a fairly cheap Rigid at Home Depot. All you need is 12Vs.
    Choose Life !!!

  11. #11
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lektro View Post
    I know everyone must be a bit shy of battery operated drills. I have been using the same 18V Makita for 12 years. Even the same batteries. Having the driver/drill combo comes in very handy. I bet you can find a fairly cheap Rigid at Home Depot. All you need is 12Vs.
    I LOVE my Milwaukee M18 drill, ordered a couple of these for work, and just had to get one for home. The impact driver is pure voodoo magic for driving in wood screws. But, for RC, it is a bit unwieldy for getting into those tight spaces. It wouldn't be terrible to use really, but I think the smaller drivers are better suited to the task.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lektro View Post
    I have worked with power tools most of my working life. I can tell you through experience and a lot of it. Buy your driver bits from Wiha tools. German made, hard and made to precision. You could also by a drill like you said, that you can change settings of how tight you want the screw. This way you have something to drill holes, which comes in handy.

    https://www.wihatools.com/bits/bit-sets

    Also what Greatscott said doing the last few threads by hand if you can. I would do the same with metal to metal. Less chance of stripping both plastic and the screw head.
    I took a look at Wiha but they're not sold anywhere in Sweden. I'd have to order from eBay but it feels like a hassle. Most items aren't located in Europe, and if they are, it'll still take some time for them to arrive.

    Thanks for the advice, I appreciate it. I decided to go with a though Bosch (Bosch GSR 12V-15). I looked at its specs a lot and tried to compare to suggestions here.

    It's a bit heavier than some of the ones I was looking at, though lighter than some of the other drives suggested below. The lighter ones were simply too weak and probably wouldn't work for anything besides RC. I wanted to be able to use it for a bit heavier stuff as well. I got the MIP-bits for it as well, I have their... (shaft-versions of hex tools?). Anyway, they're worth every penny, so sharp! They're long as well, and I'm thinking they'll make up for the fact that the driver isn't shaped like a regular pistol but rather a stub nose gun.

    It's got 21 different modes etc so I think it should suffice. I hope I didn't miss anything though, but this store's got a 60 day return deal for members. Or is it 90? Can't remember :P I'll get back to you guys with the verdict soon though

    Quote Originally Posted by Traxxas9008 View Post
    This Thread is a Hand Saver! I've been doing it by hand since day one of owning these trucks and it is really hard on the hand. (Even tho I'm 16. lol) I've been looking for something to buy. Especially when taking apart the transmission. Those long screws take forever. lol.
    Anyway, Good idea for asking @HelsRike! This thread should help many new people joining the hobby.
    Thank you Traxxas9008, I hope others will benefit from this as well From experience, I know a lot of people are afraid to ask questions that are this basic. From experience I also know that far too many simply don't know and could, if they did ask.

    I'm thinking of doing some more serious videos about these things. I sometimes write guides when learning a new hobby. It's a great way to learn, and I'm still in the newbie phase. Experienced people's advice are awesome, but most have forgotten how basic things can be complicated to newcomers. For instance, I know that 11+10=21. However, in grade school, we learn how to do this calculation using a system. A system I've long since forgotten how it works, despite (or because of) studying physics and mathematics

    Again, thanks guys

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