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Thread: Mamba x esc

  1. #1
    RC Racer
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    Mamba x esc

    Does anyone know the amps that the new castle mamba x esc produces?

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    I am looking at one that said 25A, for what that's worth.

  3. #3
    RC Racer
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    I am looking at one that said 25A, for what that's worth.
    Thatís what confusing to me because I know itís greater than that...

  4. #4
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    My bad, its 25v input max. Doesn't give amps, but states "100 amp bursts" so use 5000 mah 30c min. Up to 9 lb rig.

  5. #5
    RC Racer
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    My bad, its 25v input max. Doesn't give amps, but states "100 amp bursts" so use 5000 mah 30c min. Up to 9 lb rig.
    I donít know why they donít make it clear about the specs smh

  6. #6
    RC Qualifier
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    Below is a highly technical answer from a rep at Castle about the mamba X ratings. I would say this is a great esc to try. I used to have the Mamba monster 2. It was great.

    Quoted text from Castle rep:
    "Ok this answer is going to be a little bit technical and a little bit diplomatic, but I'll try to answer it as best I can.

    We publish current ratings for our air ESCs but we never publish an official number for our surface ESC's because it's much harder to generate a meaningful number. This is because of the way the current spikes and settles under hard acceleration. On aircraft the throttle is usually much more consistent, so a continuous number makes more sense. Cars are typically hard on the throttle for a short burst and then hard on the brakes. You typically spend very little time at a constant speed or amp draw.

    In our air ESC's our standard test uses a coupled pair of motors, one being driven by the ESC(in 5mph airflow), the other hooked up to a modified controller that provides a constant braking force onto the drive motor. These motors are spun up to 100% throttle and then a braking load is applied. The input current is measured with a calibrated current clamp and then once a desired current is found the setup is then run at a constant current for 5 minutes. If the ESC makes it the full 5 minutes, then it is cooled to room temperature and then tested again at a slightly higher constant current. If the ESC goes into thermal shutdown before the 5 minutes is up then it fails and we use a lower number for our rating.

    We do this same test for our car controllers so we know how they compare to each other, but we don't publish these numbers because they are not a comparable number to what the rest of the market publishes. This is the main reason we don't publish these numbers. If we marketed it as what we call it internally, everyone would think we had a inferior product. We don't want to have to lie to our customers by publishing an inflated number to appear competitive. We have performed our standard test on some other brand ESCs to know how they compare and typically their numbers are pretty far off. We tested a 'Stock' ESC that was rated as a 60amp continuous, 280 amp peak; Our continuous number for it was something like 24 amps, and the ESC blew up when we hit it with a short burst of 120 amps.

    What really matters is the number of MOSFETs that are used in the construction of the ESC. The more MOSFETs, the more power it can handle because of lower resistance and the more surface area to pull the heat from them. Like the Mamba Max Pro the Mamba X ESC has 18 MOSFETs, a Mamba Micro X has 6, a Sidewinder SV3 has 12, a Mamba Monster X has 30, and a Mamba XLX has 48. All 'Stock' spec ESC's that I have seen have 6 MOSFETs. Most 'Mod' spec ESC's have 12. We also use large copper bus bars on our boards to lower the resistance of the board, and potting the controller help by providing a thermal mass and in this ESC thermally linking the board to the aluminum case for better cooling. These help raise the current handling capabilities of the ESC. For example, the Mamba Monster 2 has 36 MOSFETS, but didn't have any bus bars on it, because of this the 30 MOSFET Monster X has the same current handling capability. If we followed the ratings that our competitors use, the Mamba X would probably be a 180-200 amp continuous controller, but we would never call it that.

    "

    -Liberty

  7. #7
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    Good information. Thanks for the post. My MMX has never let me down. Going on a couple years or so running a 2650kv 34/34 gearing. So it gets a workout.

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