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  1. #41
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    Thank you for the update. Awesome record keeping and very much appreciated and I like the fact your running all stock plastic axles.
    I've looked this over a few times and not sure if I keep missing it but I never seem to see what lube your using in the ceramic bearings.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rain Dawg View Post
    Thank you for the update. Awesome record keeping and very much appreciated and I like the fact your running all stock plastic axles.
    I've looked this over a few times and not sure if I keep missing it but I never seem to see what lube your using in the ceramic bearings.
    No, I never did mention the grease I'm using.

    Red N' Tacky #2 Grease by Lucas - And it sure is tacky but easy to work with - just messy!
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    No, I never did mention the grease I'm using.

    Red N' Tacky #2 Grease by Lucas - And it sure is tacky but easy to work with - just messy!
    Excellent thank you very much.

  4. #44
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    Here is the complete January log, since my previous January log was not complete at the time of my posting back then. Remember that late November 2018 is when I switched back to stock axles and have been running them since then without problems and no failures.

    Also included, is my account of the Ceramic Bearings up until March when I did a inspection and maintenance of them again; which I stated previously in the thread that I usually do bearing maintenance four times a year or about every three months.

    So here are the continued logs updated with total hours, and I will continue to update this thread until either I have a bearing failure or axle failure or just keeping logging more hours. I'm really impressed that the two differential bearings on the input pinions are holding up under 6S power.







    So I have a grand total of 7,861 Minutes or 131 Hours and 1 minute on the Ceramic Bearings and 4,574 Minutes or 76 Hours and 14 Minutes on the stock plastic axles.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 04-23-2019 at 03:09 PM. Reason: Added calculations.
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  5. #45
    RC Champion olds97_lss's Avatar
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    That's on on 6S, correct?

    I'm lucky if I get a season out of my revo sliders just on 4S. I have my punch pretty mild as well with the stock MXL-6S/2200kv system in it. Not sure what "a season" is, the first year was quite a bit every weekend, at least 4 sets of packs at ~30 minutes each.
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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by olds97_lss View Post
    That's on on 6S, correct?

    I'm lucky if I get a season out of my revo sliders just on 4S. I have my punch pretty mild as well with the stock MXL-6S/2200kv system in it. Not sure what "a season" is, the first year was quite a bit every weekend, at least 4 sets of packs at ~30 minutes each.
    Yes, it is on 6S with a Sensored Motor. What do you mean by Revo sliders.......stock plastic axles? I had mentioned earlier in the thread that if people were reading that I am still using stock plastic axles after 6 months, that they would be amazed how long they can really last if one has an understanding of how and when to get on the throttle.

    Some people just flat out squeeze that trigger as hard as they possibly can from a dead stop on every take off they do and wonder why they are only getting 15 hours out of stock axles. I at least make sure the vehicle is moving before I apply heavy throttle and I gradually increase as it's moving, verses hammering it every time out of the gate.

    I haven't even lost a 1.5mm clip yet on any of the capture cross pins and I usually at least have to replace one a month between all six drive shaft/axle components.

    When I observe people using these heavily powered systems in RC's these days, I can tell within the first minute whether or not they have an understanding of throttle control. I've actually outperformed TSM models on un-groomed tracks because I have excellent throttle control. When I installed TSM, I actually all of the sudden realized how much it interferes with someone who understands controlled acceleration concepts.

    So I removed the TSM feature from most of my models that go under 50MPH. I like it in the 1/16 Revo VXL (only exception) because the tires are so small that even when you hit a pebble at speed, it changes your course.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 04-24-2019 at 07:55 PM. Reason: Correction
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  7. #47
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    I love those plastic axles in my builds, many hours of fun in the go fast buggies. However, there is something better...... Once those OEM axles you're running give up the ghost and you are looking for something stronger, along with keeping the plastic Traxxas parts mantra, step them up to OEM 1/10 Summit CVDs. Way stronger than the U-Joint format. Proof: I have eaten E-Revo/E Maxx U-Joint axles in my scratch built crawler on EVERY outing, ONLY crawling, 3s 2400kv, 11 lb rig. From popping the clips to pulling the joints through the plastic. I have a YouTube video called 4, 3, 2, 1 Wheel Drive, appropriately named as I progressively lost axles while running. After spending more than $100 for plastic axles, like you've had good luck with, I pilfered the axles from my Summit figuring there was nothing to lose. Now, with every bit of 10-12 hrs of drive time (same place, same thing, same same same same...), not an issue whatsoever. Summit axles are worth their weight in gold IMHO, should you need something more durable than stock pieces you have been running.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    I love those plastic axles in my builds, many hours of fun in the go fast buggies. However, there is something better...... Once those OEM axles you're running give up the ghost and you are looking for something stronger, along with keeping the plastic Traxxas parts mantra, step them up to OEM 1/10 Summit CVDs.
    This is what the Summit plastic OEM 1/10 scale axles look like:



    I don't see how they would work being that one side is shorter on both the front and rear axles because of the locking differentials on the Summit.

    You did say if I wanted to keep the plastic parts mantra to try these; but I need an overall extended length of the shorter shaft to know if they would work - which I don't think they will.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 04-25-2019 at 10:31 PM. Reason: Futher clarification.
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  9. #49
    RC Champion olds97_lss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    This is what the Summit plastic OEM 1/10 scale axles look like:



    I don't see how they would work being that one side is shorter on both the front and rear axles because of the locking differentials on the Summit.

    You did say if I wanted to keep the plastic parts mantra to try these; but I need an overall extended length of the shorter shaft to know if they would work - which I don't think they will.
    You have to use the long side ones on both sides of a regular revo.
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  10. #50
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Measure center of U joint to center of the other that you have now. CVD grub screw to joint is the same. Trim the Summit to length. You can mix and match the U joint pcs withe CVDs, same axle spline arrangement. Mine are custom length regardless of which axles I ran. And you can get close to 45 degrees out of the Summits as well. Unless you have the 6 mm axles straight through, these can be made to fit.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Measure center of U joint to center of the other that you have now. CVD grub screw to joint is the same. Trim the Summit to length. You can mix and match the U joint pcs withe CVDs, same axle spline arrangement. Mine are custom length regardless of which axles I ran. And you can get close to 45 degrees out of the Summits as well. Unless you have the 6 mm axles straight through, these can be made to fit.

    I was actually looking at the HR ones that consist of the aluminum tubes but the same arrangement of the Summit axles except the expanded and collapsed lengths are more straight forward and they too can run close to the 45 angles. They are only a couple of grams heavier than the stock plastic axles.

    You should've seen the ones I was running earlier in the thread -- the Rzeppa's were heavy, and I mean heavy.
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  12. #52
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    Still Going Strong!










    So I now have a grand total of 11,015 Minutes or 183 Hours and 35 Minutes on the Ceramic Bearings and 7,728 Minutes or 128 Hours and 48 Minutes on the stock plastic axles.
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  13. #53
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    I tried those. What I didn't like about them is that on part numbers 5653/5654 (where the "ball" shaped part is connected to the rest of the part) it breaks. It wouldn't be to bad (kind of like having to change drive cups on CV's), but they are 4 times more expensive compared to drive cups on a CV setup.
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  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Everyone who grew up or lived through the transition of everything leaving this country that made the U.S. truly number 1, knows that it had everything to do with politics. I'll bite my tongue twice as much as you; but I won't continue to sit idly by as my money leaves my pocket and pretend that I don't know for a fact that steel was once very high quality and wasn't re-melted down and remixed with lesser grade materials to finish the product and pass it off as true steel.

    You would be astounded at how many grades of steel or titanium there are and the garbage filler the overseas countries add to the finishing process, that leave the consumer guessing without a metallurgical analysis of the material, to actually have any idea or inkling as to what they actually bought.

    Everything in the last 7 to 10 years that I have bought, is pretty much junk or disposable. The only thing I have bought in the last ten years that is true metal material, is MIP hex bit drivers.
    They truly are made of the stuff I remember from long ago. I'm tired of metal objects crumbling, marring or bending too easily to any type of normal use. That is far as I will go before I stretch my reply into a political statement because I'm upset and disgraced with people thinking it is O.K. to have disposable products. They (end product) use to last 10 years or more before any type of problems occurred or maintenance was needed; not anymore.
    I hear you, brother, and agree 100 present!
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  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by 222 View Post
    AMEN BROTHER!! Wish they would truly and HONESTLY Make America Great Again!!!
    Aaaaah, music to my ears!
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  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I tried those. What I didn't like about them is that on part numbers 5653/5654 (where the "ball" shaped part is connected to the rest of the part) it breaks. It wouldn't be to bad (kind of like having to change drive cups on CV's), but they are 4 times more expensive compared to drive cups on a CV setup.

    You see, this why I value your contributions to this site. You give an honest observation of something you tried. I'm going to guess you were using them with 6S, if I'm not mistaken.

    What I can't wrap my brain around yet, is the fact that stock plastic axles are outperforming the $180 set I bought earlier on in the thread. Then again, I do recall mentioning on this site, that there are some plastics that are stronger than their metal counterparts when used in the same application.

    I'll let my logs reflect and do the talking, because so far the stock plastic axles have racked up way more than the measly 8.5 hours that the Rzeppa axles did that displayed excessive wear in normal conditions. On a counter-note, I do have to take in account the design configuration of the Rzeppa axles possibly led to their demise so quickly; but then again, I would just be lying to myself to think the material used in their production was of the highest quality.

    I thought that is what I was paying for after all. It just so turns out that the denser material was in the actual axle stem itself and they cheeped out on denser materials in the spline ball section that absorbs the grunt of counter-torsional loads from the solid polished balls. All they would have to do is use a solid big drill blank and machine the grooves and grind to round the end product and they would have a serious axle worth selling at the price I bought them for. I guess that would be too easy, because then they wouldn't supposedly be making a profit on an already 70% marked up item.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 07-04-2019 at 02:12 PM. Reason: Fixed something.
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  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    You see, this why I value your contributions to this site. You give an honest observation of something you tried. I'm going to guess you were using them with 6S, if I'm not mistaken.
    Thanks Flux, and yep I was using 6s. The stock drive shafts and axles work really good with 4s, but with 6s the pins used in the "U" joints elongate the hole they are fitted to. Eventually, the pins cut right though the plastic "U" joint.

    Back in my Tamiya days they used the same "U" joint setup, but everything was all metal. They lasted longer than plastic, but still wore out the same way. It's just the weakness of the "U" joint design. (IMO) dog bones and drive cups work the best, splines are next, and "U" joints have the least longevity. That's why I suggested Traxxas CV's, because they utilize dog bones and drive cups in their design.
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  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    Thanks Flux, and yep I was using 6s. The stock drive shafts and axles work really good with 4s, but with 6s the pins used in the "U" joints elongate the hole they are fitted to. Eventually, the pins cut right though the plastic "U" joint.

    Back in my Tamiya days they used the same "U" joint setup, but everything was all metal. They lasted longer than plastic, but still wore out the same way. It's just the weakness of the "U" joint design. (IMO) dog bones and drive cups work the best, splines are next, and "U" joints have the least longevity. That's why I suggested Traxxas CV's, because they utilize dog bones and drive cups in their design.
    P.S. As we talk about different drive setups, I generally look at things from my default point of view which bashing. I'm doing that here too. If I was looking at this from a racing point of view, I would lean more heavily towards a spline setup. (IMO) the spline setup would be better for racing, because of having less slop and better response to user input; and a drive-cup/dog-bone set up would be better for bashing, because of its' ruggedness and cheaper cost.
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  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    P.S. As we talk about different drive setups, I generally look at things from my default point of view which bashing. I'm doing that here too. If I was looking at this from a racing point of view, I would lean more heavily towards a spline setup. (IMO) the spline setup would be better for racing, because of having less slop and better response to user input; and a drive-cup/dog-bone set up would be better for bashing, because of its' ruggedness and cheaper cost.

    The thing that bothers me about most drive setups, is the amount of torsional play between components when the driveshaft is new. You know how when you have a brand new MIP driver and a brand new hex screw how there is zero play? I mean my MIP drivers with the handles for manual turning stand up on their own when inserted into a brand new hex screw. I have to actually give the MIP driver a tug or push to get it to interact with the hex screw.

    If most drive setups started off with less slop to begin with, the wear ratio wouldn't start immediately like it does on most setups. The tolerance aspect is what I'm getting at here. The stock plastic axles had virtually zero torsional play when I twisted them back and forth in my hand before installation.

    The Rzeppas had some torsional play even before they were used. That right there should've gave me a hint that they weren't going to last very long.
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  20. #60
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. ReglarGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    The stock plastic axles had virtually zero torsional play when I twisted them back and forth in my hand before installation.
    You are right on with the advantage of the stock axles. The problem with stock axles is, though, that the "U" joint pin holes elongate quickly from the torsional force being applied to the "U" joint pins. With 4s it happens eventually, but with 6s it happens real fast no matter if you're using metal (Tamyia) or plastic (Traxxas) "U" joints.

    If you want no slop and longer lasting wear, you want splines. Yes, eventually splines will work fatigue at the point where the drive balls meet their mounts, but they won't fail as fast as plastic (stock) or metal (after market) "U" joints. With splines you will have no slop until failure. With drive-cups/dog-bones you will always have slop. That's why most guys like splines for racing, and drive-cups/dog-bones for bashing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    The Rzeppas had some torsional play even before they were used. That right there should've gave me a hint that they weren't going to last very long.
    The problem with those expensive drives that you got a while ago, was that they weren't a true spline. They were spoked. The problem with using a spoke design in a drive is that it has to much space between each spoke which allows torsional force to be developed before being stopped by a spoke.

    Splines don't do that, because they have an ample amount of teeth to keep torsional force from being developed...thus, no slop. The problem with spines is though, that being there is no slop, max amount of torsional force is being applied to all the material of the components in a spline assembly, and that force will find the weakest point (in the material being used) in that assembly.

    With spines, that material weak point is where the drive ball meets it's mount. (IMO) this is because, the material being used (in conjunction with the insufficient thickness of the joint) isn't strong enough.

    This brings us to a point you made above. For the money being charged, why not used denser materials, or have a thicker joint? The answer to your question is: I ain't got a clue. (lol) Actually, the answer is: if this weak spot was beefed up, the torsional force would find another weak spot due to the inherrent design of a spline setup.

    Hopefully, I'm conveying what's going on here. In engineering there's always give and take and pro's and con's. You can't get away from it. All you can do is make a decision on what will work best for you. For me being a basher, I've found that CV's work best. For you, whether you eventually go with drive-cups/dog-bones, splines or spokes, they will all eventually fail. What you need to figure out is what will work and fail the way you want them to, at a cost that you can afford, and at a maintenance rate you're willing to do.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-06-2019 at 06:16 AM.
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  21. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    Hopefully, I'm conveying what's going on here.

    Yes, you are conveying what is going on as far as torsional stress finding the next weak link in a driveshaft setup; however, my point cannot be stressed enough that torsional stresses are addressed by tolerance issues. If a piece of material is constantly hammering the the adjacent material because the fitment does not have a tight tolerance, the breakdown of the material is more rapid regardless of what the material is made of.

    Now think about that for a moment; I got plastic stock axles that have over a hundred documented hours from my above logs and they are showing minimal wear compared to its metal counterparts in its design. In other words, how is it that the plastic materials are holding up to the metal cross pins and joint? It's very simple; the tolerances are well matched which leads to less torsional shock loads.

    Over time; yes, the plastic holes get out of round at the yokes and half shafts, but overall for the price verses the logged hours, I'm sticking with the plastic axles because the logged hours are all the proof I need at this point in time with my setup.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 07-06-2019 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Spelling.
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  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Over time; yes, the plastic holes get out of round at the yokes and half shafts, but overall for the price verses the logged hours, I'm sticking with the plastic axles because the logged hours are all the proof I need at this point in time with my setup.
    I'm sorry, I misunderstood. I thought you were having issues with your stock plastic drives and axles. Then you got the metal spoke design ones, and that they were worse...especially for the money.

    If you are getting the best time and wear out of the stock plastic drive shafts and axles (compared to Traxxas CV's, your old spoked ones, and splines) you are very lucky, and you would be crazy to use anything else. I though you were having trouble with your plastic stock drive shafts and axles, and wanted thoughts on potentially a better setup.

    I say you're lucky, because when I went from 4s to 6s with my Emaxx I was only getting about 8 to 10 runs out of my plastic stockers before I had to replace one. When I would replace the one that was bad, I would see that the others didn't have much time to live either. I was eating them up that bad.

    My wife had the same problem with her plastic stockers on her Summit. I tried splines on her truck, and they worked very well. She didn't have nearly as many problems with them as she did with her plastics. The only thing I didn't like about them, was them, and their replacement parts were hard to get. Also, they were way more expensive than CV's and the plastic stockers. I eventually replaced her splines to CV's due of this.

    I never tried the spoked type like you did, because I don't think they were available back when I first got my Emaxx (10 years ago). When I seen yours, I knew I they wouldn't work better for me than what I have now. I know that it's upsetting to spend good money on RC stuff that doesn't work out well, but it happens to the best of us. On occasion, when it happens to me, I laugh it off as a learning experience. I'm definitely a guy that learns from my mistakes, and I'm sure you're that way to.

    The bottom line is, though, what works the best for you. For me CV's work the best, and their parts are cheap and easy for me to get. For you, your saying the plastic stockers and their replacement parts work the best for you.

    That's totally cool with me. (IMHO) if you have tried all the drive options for you Emaxx, and the plastic stocker works the best for you, then you have no other logical choice. You have to go with the plastic stockers.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-06-2019 at 06:21 PM.
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  23. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    That's totally cool with me. (IMHO) if you have tried all the drive options for you Emaxx, and the plastic stocker works the best for you, then you have no other logical choice. You have to go with the plastic stockers.

    By no means have I tried all the available options for my setup. I have however, in this thread, documented two types and compared them with accurate time logs. After I destroy one or more of the stock plastic axles, I will continue this thread with a log of how Traxxas CV's hold up compared to the stock plastic axles.

    Remember, my logs currently reflect two things; one is the hours put on the Ceramic Bearings and the other is the hours on the stock plastic axles. I promised early in the thread to keep accurate logs and report when a failure happens to either a bearing or an axle.

    I haven't seen anyone post logs of how many hours they have on a particular setup, and thought it would be interesting to share real results in real time. I will even go as far as reporting when or if I have to change my motor out in the current setup reflected in this thread. That is important, because the KV of a motor and the punch settings in the ESC determine the longevity of driveshaft setups too.

    I'm currently using a Castle 2200 Kv motor (1515 1Y Sensored) with the Mamba Monster X ESC and the punch control set to the mildest setting as mentioned earlier. If somewhere along the course of this thread, should those variables change, it is important to document it for fairness and honesty and the logs would have to be reset to reflect the changes and a new set of axles installed.

    The bottom line is, (in fairness) I'm not hammering the crap out of this current drive-line. I'm taking it out almost everyday and simply doing light bashing and some jumping but mostly hill climbing. Remember, I will report when the first thing fails and at the exact minute it happened, even if it is something as trivial as a 1.5mm E-clip falling off!
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  24. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    By no means have I tried all the available options for my setup. I have however, in this thread, documented two types and compared them with accurate time logs. After I destroy one or more of the stock plastic axles, I will continue this thread with a log of how Traxxas CV's hold up compared to the stock plastic axles.
    I'm not trying to be hard headed or anything, so let me see if I got this right. You are presently in research mode, and in the future you will have determined what axle and drive shaft setup works best for you...that's cool. That's what I did.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Remember, my logs currently reflect two things; one is the hours put on the Ceramic Bearings and the other is the hours on the stock plastic axles. I promised early in the thread to keep accurate logs and report when a failure happens to either a bearing or an axle.
    I think on long winded posts it's easy to forget what was mentioned in the beginning. Where are you using your Ceramic Bearings?

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    I haven't seen anyone post logs of how many hours they have on a particular setup, and thought it would be interesting to share real results in real time. I will even go as far as reporting when or if I have to change my motor out in the current setup reflected in this thread. That is important, because the KV of a motor and the punch settings in the ESC determine the longevity of driveshaft setups too.
    There are a few, but not many. It's always nice though, to read about someone's research and their conclusions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    I'm currently using a Castle 2200 Kv motor (1515 1Y Sensored) with the Mamba Monster X ESC and the punch control set to the mildest setting as mentioned earlier. If somewhere along the course of this thread, should those variables change, it is important to document it for fairness and honesty and the logs would have to be reset to reflect the changes and a new set of axles installed.
    I agree. It's important to be fair and objective with experiments and research. Also, I'm surprised that you went sensored and mild for your Emaxx. Usually people do that for crawlers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    The bottom line is, (in fairness) I'm not hammering the crap out of this current drive-line. I'm taking it out almost everyday and simply doing light bashing and some jumping but mostly hill climbing. Remember, I will report when the first thing fails and at the exact minute it happened, even if it is something as trivial as a 1.5mm E-clip falling off!
    That makes sense as to why you're getting such good life out of your stock plastic drives at 6s, and why I don't. I don't use punch control, and I like to terrorize the terrain with my Emaxx. I jump, but not crazy jumps. I climb, but use controlled speed and power to get me to the top rather than fineness.

    I think you'll agree that driving style has a lot to do with what part selections work best for a given driving style. I think when your done with your research you're going to find that the stock plastics or splines will work the best for you and your setup and driving style. From what you're telling me, you're going to want minimum slop for the most control.

    I have to admit, I never considered using the Emaxx as a crawler type vehicle. Usually guys use them for bashing or racing, so that was my mindset when I was discussing things with you. Also, even though there has been guys who have offered logs in the past, I think you will be the first to offer logs from a crawling perspective. It will be interesting to see, if you eventually agree with me, that plastics or splines are the best way to go for your driving style.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I'm not trying to be hard headed or anything, so let me see if I got this right. You are presently in research mode, and in the future you will have determined what axle and drive shaft setup works best for you...that's cool. That's what I did.
    It is an on-going process, correct.



    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I think on long winded posts it's easy to forget what was mentioned in the beginning. Where are you using your Ceramic Bearings?
    Every single bearing in the truck including motor and an additional two bearings in the steering assembly.



    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    There are a few, but not many. It's always nice though, to read about someone's research and their conclusions.
    There is a method to my madness!



    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I agree. It's important to be fair and objective with experiments and research. Also, I'm surprised that you went sensored and mild for your Emaxx. Usually people do that for crawlers.
    I'll put my 6S E-Maxx up against any stock X-Maxx and probably still keep up.



    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    That makes sense as to why you're getting such good life out of your stock plastic drives at 6s, and why I don't. I don't use punch control, and I like to terrorize the terrain with my Emaxx. I jump, but not crazy jumps. I climb, but use controlled speed and power to get me to the top rather than fineness.
    Yep!

    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I think you'll agree that driving style has a lot to do with what part selections work best for a given driving style. I think when your done with your research you're going to find that the stock plastics or splines will work the best for you and your setup and driving style. From what you're telling me, you're going to want minimum slop for the most control.
    That is the way I'm leaning but if I want to bash hard, you suggested the Traxxas CV's.

    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I have to admit, I never considered using the Emaxx as a crawler type vehicle. Usually guys use them for bashing or racing, so that was my mindset when I was discussing things with you. Also, even though there has been guys who have offered logs in the past, I think you will be the first to offer logs from a crawling perspective. It will be interesting to see, if you eventually agree with me, that plastics or splines are the best way to go for your driving style.
    I'm not really crawling with it. My buddy had a radar gun on it one day when I went flying down the street and it hit 58mph and I still had trigger left. I'll bash with the best of them, but I would go the Traxxas CV route like you had recommended several times to me in the past.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Every single bearing in the truck including motor and an additional two bearings in the steering assembly.
    I just repack my stock bearings with marine grade grease. I have had good luck doing that, and it's costs me a lot less, but I'd be interested in how your experiment works out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    I'll put my 6S E-Maxx up against any stock X-Maxx and probably still keep up.
    The thing about the Xmaxx (8s not stock 6s) is its' size along with its' speed. My beefed up Xmaxx goes 56 miles per hour. My Emaxx does what yours does at 58 miles per hour. My Xmaxx is way more stable at its' top speed than my Emaxx is. It is definitely fun watching something that big going that fast. The fun thing with my Emaxx is its' power to weight ratio. It's just crazy compared to an Xmaxx, and that's what makes it fun. What I'm trying to say here is, that both trucks have their unique fun factors.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    That is the way I'm leaning but if I want to bash hard, you suggested the Traxxas CV's.
    Yep, that's the way I'd go (if I was strictly bashing), but if I wanted to bash and crawl I'd go the way you did with sensored and splines.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    I'm not really crawling with it. My buddy had a radar gun on it one day when I went flying down the street and it hit 58mph and I still had trigger left. I'll bash with the best of them, but I would go the Traxxas CV route like you had recommended several times to me in the past.
    With my setup, that's my top speed too. This brings me to two old famous quotes; "Great minds think alike" and "Great tucks run alike." (lol)

    P.S. Don't you just love quotes? It make things so much easier to follow. Don't you think?
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-13-2019 at 03:57 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    With my setup, that's my top speed too. This brings me to two old famous quotes; "Great minds think alike" and "Great tucks run alike." (lol)

    P.S. Don't you just love quotes? It make things so much easier to follow. Don't you think?

    Sure enough! After this summer run on the E-Maxx Brushless, I may just fix it up one last time and shelf queen it. There is another brand of vehicle that I have been looking over the schematics and it just makes better sense how it is built. It has a center brace tower to tower, the motor and battery wires are more ergonomically placed so as to prevent stress stretching,the motor pinion is easier to align with the main drive spur and the entire bottom of the truck is flat so that you don't have to worry about getting sudden kicks from underneath that flip other trucks.

    It isn't as big as the X-Maxx; but it sure is a tougher design out of the box compared to the X-Maxx. With the X-Maxx, the center ground clearance is no different than a T-Maxx or E-Maxx Brushless. Now how in the world did Traxxas design a truck with tires that are almost two inches taller than 6.3's and didn't improve its overall ground clearance? You figure they make something as big as the X-Maxx and they would've at least managed to sneak another inch of ground clearance in there somehow; especially right below the differentials where ground clearance is the most important.

    Traxxas makes the mistake of advertising its trucks as having an optimal ground clearance because they think center ground clearance is the important clearance, when in fact, it is the clearance right below the differentials that is more important in reality because that is the part slapping the ground - not the center of the truck.

    I just can't bring myself to buy a truck that big, that managed to ignore ground clearances for its size.
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    I wonder what truck? I guess it must be a "forbidden to mention truck." Traxxas does many things that I would do differently, but many other companies do too...in one way or another. This (IMO) being the case, I usually look to see if I can adapt a truck to my needs before I buy. One good thing about Traxxas (that always makes me give them first shot) is there customer service, product support, and parts availability. Those are really big things for me. Thankfully, there are ways to get more (between 1 and 2 inches) of ground clearance out of a Emaxx and Xmaxx.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-14-2019 at 01:42 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    I wonder what truck? I guess it must be a "forbidden to mention truck." Traxxas does many things that I would do differently, but many other companies do too...in one way or another. This (IMO) being the case, I usually look to see if I can adapt a truck to my needs before I buy. One good thing about Traxxas (that always makes me give them first shot) is there customer service, product support, and parts availability. Those are really big things for me. Thankfully, there are ways to get more (between 1 and 2 inches) of ground clearance out of a Emaxx and Xmaxx.
    You seem to have a full PM box - message bounced!


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    My Inbox was half filled, but I emptied it anyway. Give'er another shot.
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    You can mention that truck here. It's not on the Traxxas forbidden list. The only thing we can't do is do a direct comparison of it to a Emaxx. My understanding is it's against the rules. I personally couldn't find that in the rules, but I take the moderators word for it. Anyway, it's nice truck, but it's only a 3 or 4s truck. The Emaxx is a 4 to 6s truck, and us comparing the two would like comparing apples to pastrami sandwiches.

    I say that because, I have a couple of friends that use only 4s with their Emaxx's. They run them completely stock, and hardly ever have a problem with them. The problem comes when using a Emaxx with 6s, and I'm sure that Arrma truck would be the same.

    You can run a Emaxx reliably on 6s, but you do have to work the bugs out. You can also get more ground clearance. You can do all what you need to do to an Emaxx to run reliably on 6s for about a 150 bucks. Some of the guys here go crazy with the aluminum, RPM stuff and high dollar bearings; but that's not really necessary if all you want is good Emaxx reliability.

    If you're having a particular problem with your Emaxx, I'd be glad to show you what you can do to eliminate the problem. The only thing you can't expect from your Emaxx (or any other RC) is to be able to repeatedly 6s slam it into obstacles, or crash from crazy high jumps, and have it never break something.

    In other words making your Emaxx completely "bulletproof." However, it's not unreasonable to expect your Emaxx to run reliably for a complete season without having to do more than minimum maintenance.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-19-2019 at 04:39 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    Anyway, it's nice truck, but it's only a 3 or 4s truck.
    They have a 6S version and it's called the BLX 6S Version.

    It is a 1/8th scale.
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  33. #73
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    Nice truck. I was looking at the Exploded View, and things look good. They do however, use the same basic engineering techniques as an Emaxx. Making a big story short, their diffs are laid out the same, but with bigger diff pinion gear bearings.

    It would of been nice if Traxxas would have done this when they stepped up the Emaxx up from 4s to 6s. You can easily correct this Traxxas oversight for about 10 bucks (for both diffs) by dumping the Emaxx stock diff pinion gear bearings, and upgrading them to Tamiya 9415549 bushings from eBay. I've had mine in for about a year now with absolutely no diff problems or wear.

    Here, I made mine. Then someone turned me on to the Tamiya's. I then switched to them by changing both of my diff's pinion gear bearings.



    P.S. Very nice truck, but I do like the Emaxx layout better than the Arrma. I'm a bigger fan of the batteries being on the outsides, and the electronics being in the middle rather than the batteries on one side, and the electronics on the other.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-21-2019 at 04:43 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    P.S. Very nice truck, but I do like the Emaxx layout better than the Arrma. I'm a bigger fan of the batteries being on the outsides, and the electronics being in the middle rather than the batteries on one side, and the electronics on the other.
    I agree with your assessment of the layout and that is why in understanding that I'm geared more towards the Arrma because the wires are more suited for jumping because of how they are laid out in a flat configuration instead of free-lance bouncing inside the body shell.

    I know that wires can be shortened on the motor, ESC and batteries (you and I had a lengthy discussion about it) but it is more about how flat they lay versus how long they are when it comes to jumping.

    Basically, that type of configuration will allow your electronics wires to have less stress from momentum inertia that stresses other wire configurations and ultimately leads to wire connection failures.

    Now the 64 thousand dollar question is whether or not the Arrma layout is balanced because of its electrical layout. I would tend to think the truck would be off kilter because of unbalanced weight displacement, but have been reading about guys running two 3S batteries on them with no issues in the handling department.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 07-21-2019 at 05:52 AM. Reason: Added information.
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  35. #75
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    Looking at the video, it didn't look like they were having any left/right balance issues. I think (with this truck anyway) you should be good to go balance wise. If you wanted to be absolutely sure, though, you could perform a balance test on one in a LHS.

    As far as wires/wire connections taking a hit with either machine, (IMO) they both should be good. The key to keeping stress off wiring isn't where the electronics is located, but how the wiring is laced. If done properly, wire runs are not to loose or to tight, and they contain service loops or service bends to allow for things like: chassis stress, temp changes, vibration, and system shock. If done properly, both machines should have trouble free wiring for years and years for both bashing and for crazy jumping.

    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-21-2019 at 03:05 PM.
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  36. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    As far as wires/wire connections taking a hit with either machine, (IMO) they both should be good. The key to keeping stress off wiring isn't where the electronics is located, but how the wiring is laced.
    That was what I was getting at, although my key point was that the wiring was in a more flat configuration which means it is more at stable rest instead of being loomed just to get it out of the way.

    Also, if you look closely at the ingenuity that went into how the motor wires don't have to arch in the Arrma setups, I think you'll see what I'm getting at. They still arch, but they are laying more at "stable 1" horizontally versus vertically down to the ESC like in your picture.
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  37. #77
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    I did see some nice wiring layouts with Arrma. Two things, though:

    1). As long as your wires have enough slack in them (not to tight) for chassis stress/temp changes/vibration/system shock, and are secured properly to where they don't get hug up (not to loose) on moving parts; the rest is cosmetic preference.

    2). If you go on to the Horizon website, lookup your truck, go though the pictures, magnify the open chassis view; you can see that the wiring isn't 100% flat. Their wires are arched much like my setup. It's just the best way to go. There's absolutely no stress on either truck examples, at rest or in action.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 07-22-2019 at 05:22 PM.
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    Finally A Failure On The Stock Axles!

    As I mentioned, I would report the first failure in either the bearings or axles. First I will post my log for July:



    Here is what happened to the center rear driveshaft:



    A rock got wedged between the center rear skid plate and center rear driveshaft and it ground a perfect indentation all the way around the circumference of the center rear driveshaft, virtually cutting it like a pipe cutter and weakening it badly. I usually run without the center skid in order to avoid this very situation that occurred; but dummy me put it on and I paid the reaper.

    It would have been nice to continue logging hours on the stock plastic axles and I probably would've got a lot more hours on them if I would not have put that center skid back on.

    So..................

    I went to the Traxxas CV's next:





    Now before you chide me for not having the rubber boots on the CV's, please understand that I was troubleshooting why the cross pins kept falling out:



    Here is why they kept falling out; this is the length Traxxas thinks they need to be:



    Here is the length they need to be to stop from falling out:



    I have seen stupidity in engineering before, but this is flat out incompetence on Traxxas' part. When the cross pin is 11.71mm (the pin length provided with the CV's when bought new), it is too short to remain captured within the cup.

    It really burns me that we put up with paying $80 for the CV's plus another $40 for the center CV's and the pins are too short. It would've been one thing if they were breaking; but flat out just falling out is inexcusable negligence by engineering standards.

    While I was at it, I applied my engineering skills and made the cross pins thicker than what Traxxas provides.

    Here is the Traxxas cross pin width:



    Here is my cross pin width:



    2.60mm is about the max you can go before it is too tight in the 5187, 5188 or 5154 part number pieces. You do have to drill/bore out piece 5129, 5166 and 5162 to accommodate a 2.60mm cross pin width.

    Since applying my cross pin fix, I have not had a single problem with losing cross pins anymore, plus mine are stronger than theirs and could no doubt handle 8S if I found a way to run the E-Maxx Brushless like that.

    I used drill blanks to make the cross pins. Super tough now!
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  39. #79
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    In fairness to Traxxas, I did find this:



    Those pins are the 12mm correct length; but why in the heck on my new pre-assembled CV's would the pins measure 11.71mm. Traxxas doesn't even make a 11.71mm pin

    That makes absolutely no sense how 11.71mm axle pins made it into pre-assembled CV's unless their production run ran into a calibration issue when cutting pin lengths.

    It is the only explanation unless I buy more axle pins and find they are the incorrect length as well; but it is too late now, as I have fixed the issue with better pins.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 08-01-2019 at 09:24 AM. Reason: Correction.
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  40. #80
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    If your cross pins aren't flush to the outside barrel on both sides you should call up Traxxas. In the first picture below I purposely have the pin positioned for viewing purposes.





    Once the cross pin is in position to where the RED sleeve fits over it, and the allen screw pin secured, that cross pin should stay put. Someday down the road, that cross pin and its' hole may get sloppy on you, but that takes a good long time for that to happen.



    Also, a little trick I do that really helps save my diffs (if you jump and bash a lot) is installing your CV drive shafts with the RED sleeves facing the transmission rather than the diffs. From there you set up your diffs with 6mm shims between the drive cup and your diff's outer pinion bearing (I already told you about replacing the diff's two pinion bearings with OiLite bushings).

    What this does is, it 100% keeps your drive shaft from banging your pinion gear out of position with your diff's spur gear. This can happen if you have enough of a chassis flex (from high jump landings) that causes your dog bone to bottom out in your diff cup which then pushes the pinion gear out of it's null relationship with the spur gear.



    Note: Depending on my diff and CV, sometimes I have to add a 1mm shim with the 6mm shim to get and secure my diff's pinion gear's sweet spot.

    P.S. Pictured above are my aluminum diff cases. You don't need them. The stockers work just fine. I have these, because a friend of mine gave'em to me for Christmas a ways back. I haven't needed to use them yet.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 08-04-2019 at 03:30 PM.
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