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  1. #1
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Question How do you tune your Slash's suspension?

    So that we can have a thread dedicated to this topic, what do/did you do to tune/improve your suspension, for what application, and how did you tangibly prove what you did actually worked? Seems everyone has an recipe, so whatcha got? Different oils, springs, caps, pistons, shock bodies, shocks, shock towers........????

  2. #2
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    Oh man, here comes a novel. You've been warned.

    Step 1: Weight. Weight is the foundation on which the rest of your setup relies. You change weight and you change your whole car's setup. Weight affects the effective spring rates on your shocks, the damping on your shocks, and the roll center of the front and rear of the car, and the roll axis of the entire car. Once I place weight in my car, I never touch it again unless I find I absolutely have to. I try to centralize weight as much as is possible.

    Step 2: Wheelbase. This is my second adjustment. Again, set this and don't touch it. When you change your wheelbase you're actually altering the weight distribution of your car ever so slightly, which again, weight is the foundation of your setup.

    Step 3: Front kick angle. Most cars don't have the ability to adjust it, but if the car I'm tuning does, this is when I adjust it. Front kick angle changes the effective spring rate of the front of the car, so if you change front kick you change front kick and your front spring stiffness.

    Step 4: Arm/pivot length. Similar to front kick, changing arm lengths and pivot widths can effectively change your spring rates. That's why I try to set them to what I think I want them to before I tune my shocks.

    Step 5: Springs. Here's where things start getting fun. I tune my cars so I know the front and rear shocks will respond exactly the same to the same input. This keeps the car from acting funky on the track and to me, makes a huge difference in the driveability of the car. Steps 1-4 are just precursors to doing this vitally important step. If I find I need to do anything related to steps 1-4 after doing this step, I basically go back and start all over again with tuning the car. To tune my springs, I take the oil out of the shocks, put the shocks back on the car, press down on the car, quickly take my finger off the car and let it spring back up, and watch the results back in slow-mo. Below is what it looks like when the front spring is too stiff in comparison to the rear spring:



    And below is what I am looking to achieve:



    See the difference? The front and rear end rise back up at the same speed. This is when I stop. To get to this point, I'll try different springs and I'll change the lower and upper shock mounting points. Lots of people have all this voodoo they subscribe to when it comes to shock mounting locations, but the reality is that you're only changing leverage points, which only has the effect of changing the effective spring stiffness. Mount the shock further in on the arm/tower and you have a softer suspension. Further out = stiffer. Simple as that. Once I've gotten the springs matched I don't ever touch shock mounting locations again. I'll also get the droop equal on all 4 corners at this point, too.

    Step 6: Oils. I'll fill the shocks back up with oil and repeat the push down/release test. If one end raises back up faster than the other, I'll tinker with oils until they pop back up evenly.

    Step 7: Pistons. This one's a little harder to test for. I'll drop the car from a foot or two in the air and watch how the front and rear respond. I don't have an example of what I'm looking for, but I make sure both ends compress roughly the same amount. What you don't want is one end to chassis slap and the other to barely compress at all. Another thing I do to test this is drive the car around and put a small bump. The guy I picked this method up off of used a garden hose. Drive the car over the garden hose and both ends of the car should respond roughly the same as it hits the garden hose. If one end of the car pops up alot higher when it hits then you've got a mismatch.

    Step 8: Everything else. Now that I've gotten this far, I've done most of the hard work. Everything else is minor tuning at the track. Camber links, anti-squat, toe in, camber, caster, etc. These are things I do to tune the handling characteristics of the car. Just don't change anything that affects weight or you're back to step 4.

    If at this point I've found that my shocks aren't quite where I want them to be, I'll go back and focus on whatever aspect I think I need to change. Usually once I set my springs/shock locations I almost never go back and change them. Even going from track to track most changes I need to make are camber links.

    As an example, on the slash I'm working on now I went through and did all my steps but I'm unhappy with how my car jumps and lands. I've identified the car slaps too much on landing and I need more pack/damping. In this case, I will go back to step 6 only I'll start with different pistons in the shock that will give me more pack.

    This is a procedure I use no matter what car I have. 2wd buggy. 4wd short course. 1/14 mini. It works on everything I've tried it on and gets me a great driving car every time.

  3. #3
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Great start!! I don't do the track, but its evidently quite similar to a "desert race" tune in many ways, but I have WAAAAY more wheel travel to work with. So what is the litmus test at the track to prove what is wrong. With your novel, you have covered a lot of ground, but in lehman terms so I even get it. Do you hit a certain section over and over or what? How do you know that its working better? Also, to those who are looking to apply the newfound information above, CHANGE ONE THING AT A TIME AND DOCUMENT THE RESULTS. Document your changes so you know where you started or where things went astray. Granted, your Slash doesn't have all the geometry changing features as AE does, some widgets are available to do a little of this. When I get time, I'll put up a video clip of when I did my first scratch build, working on the rear shocks. We'll see who the shock doctors are by the diagnosis and cure. (BTW, which program gives you a direct embed and not a link?) Thanks Nick. Who is next???

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  5. #5
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    The litmus test for me was when I went from consistent middle of the pack B main to consistent back of the pack A main after I learned about this method. There was a definite improvement in my ability to get the car to do what I wanted it to do on the track.

    Honestly I don't think I can make it any simpler. I pulled this method from a user on another forum, and the thread with this info in its raw form is well over 100 pages long. Consider my version the condensed/simplified version.

    Knowing how to change something and when to change it is just something that comes from experience and from having a good foundation knowledge on what each part of the car. But broadly speaking, there are two types of problems you can have, and you solve them differently. You can have problems with jumping, which you fix with your shocks, or you can have problems with handling, which you fix with just about everything else, but mostly camber links. Once you identify a problem you can start working towards a solution. You bring up a good point, change one thing at a time. If what you changed didn't help you solve the issue that was identified, revert it back and try something else.

    There will be no such thing as a "perfect" tune. You will always have a compromise somewhere. For example, a car with really low ride height will carve through the turns, but will be unable to handle any bumps or jumps. Where you decide you want the balance to be between those two goals is up to personal preference. When trying to find that balance, some tracks will require you to go one way more than the other. Cars that run on outdoor dirt tracks with lots of ruts and large jumps run higher ride heights. Indoor carpet tracks are very smooth with not many big jumps, so lower ride height wins out.

  6. #6
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    20141115_134143 by MAC FAB, on Flickr

    https://flic.kr/p/2a8M91S

    One of these has to work.......^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Where do we go from here??? Shock tuners???
    Last edited by MAC FAB; 11-14-2018 at 01:35 PM.

  7. #7
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Check out Jang's series on suspension tuning....


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQykao20ifw
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  8. #8
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    That vid of you running Macfab looks like the rear is bouncing on the tires and the front looks a little soft. I might use a lower weight shock oil in the rear and heavier in the front. However, I am not familiar with running the solid rear axle (I think your rig has solid rear...no?)

    edit: need more video
    MTFBWY

  9. #9
    RC Champion FnFancy's Avatar
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    I'll agree, something is outta whack. I've read that thread that describes tuning your shocks by starting with just springs. Very, very informative! And makes sense to boot. Macfab, your truck is imbalanced. The front and rear are not in sink. I would suggest draining oil, and do that rebound test while the shocks are dry. Match your springs and adjust oil from there. It truly is an art form, and while that method might take some time and effort, I think the results speak for themselves. I wish I remember where I read that, I know I was louggleing (movie reference) rc suspension tuning when I came across it.

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  10. #10
    RC Champion FnFancy's Avatar
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    I got it! Very good suspension tuning information. https://www.rctech.net/forum/electri...ber-links.html

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by FnFancy View Post
    I got it! Very good suspension tuning information. https://www.rctech.net/forum/electri...ber-links.html

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    I wasn't sure if it's ok to post links to other forums so I left it out of my post, but this is the exact thread I mentioned in my post above. fredswain is the real deal and his method works.

  12. #12
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    I will be the first (maybe only?) to dissent with the fredswain method. I started with it about 4 years ago and originally thought it was the cats meow. IMO it's OK as a place to start if you really have no idea what springs to try, but I pretty much never use it now.
    youtube.com/c/RazorRCvideos

  13. #13
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    I've been on here for a few years but haven't figured out multi quote. :^/ Anyhow, weight bias of my car is 50/50 with the battery, from a drop of 18", for a static evaluation, it was perfect. Didn't bottom out and went right back to its ride height. Going to keep the cat in the bag for a bit, look harder. You also need to realize this has 5" of travel out back, just shy of 3-3/4" up front. I'll add .02 to what would work on the track, those with practical wisdom will poke fun at it. All good. As for links, I don't think we've crossed the line, brings more good traffic for eveyone. No product sales pitches, purely information. Razor and Nick, be ready for a barrage of questions, I have a bunch regarding the track.

  14. #14
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Good starting point evaluation, Synnergy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Synnergy View Post
    That vid of you running Macfab looks like the rear is bouncing on the tires and the front looks a little soft. I might use a lower weight shock oil in the rear and heavier in the front. However, I am not familiar with running the solid rear axle (I think your rig has solid rear...no?)

    edit: need more video
    That statement is the key to everything. IMHO you can use the other formulas to get you where you think you should be, but just like 1:1, what I thought I saw and what actually was were two different things, video doesn't lie. This car is IRS, trailing arms (not a solid axle), desert race shock tune, not for the track. Rear first. Suspension is packing, the result of one of 2 things: not stiff enough springs (too much preload to get ride height on too soft of a spring so the shock doesn't react quick enough, thus a slow spring) or bad valving. Springs got a little more preload (they had nothing), valving (50/50 standard valving) was the major problem. Compression was finally set to 1 hole on the piston, rebound now has 3, 2 larger holes than the compression side with bypass valving. Went from 30wt to 25wt and the rear was fixed. Added 1 preload spacer to the front to stiffen the initial inertia hit and it was golden. Prior to shooting video, it appeared to be a compression problem, not a rebound issue. Everything I did made performance worse. Slo mo video is your best friend, for tuning or driving evaluation. How many of you track guys do this???

  15. #15
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    I race on indoor carpet, and I'm still trying to get it dialed in. The way I document changes is with setup sheets. I keep several sheets for different track tunes.
    https://traxxas.com/pitpass/setupsheets
    My biggest issue on my local indoor carpet track is traction rolling on tight turns. I've dropped the car as low as aftermarket parts will allow, and I still have problems traction rolling. Also, the car has no brakes compared to my race quality cars. It bugs me that there is no way to adjust the brakes with the stock ESC. I'm swapping the ESC soon with a race quality ESC just to get better braking. I've gotten the car to where it won't roll on most turns if I stay off the gas until the car is through the turn, and by being very smooth with my race lines and throttle/brake control. Whenever I get aggressive with my turn in and throttle, the car will traction roll every time. It for sure doesn't handle as well as my Mod class Team C buggy, or my AE Stadium truck. It's probably asking too much for a “basher class” car, but I'm still determined to try. Most racers at the track just shake their heads at me for trying to make a Traxxas fast on carpet. The general opinion is that it's not possible. They say Traxxas cars are for bashing or for loose outdoor tracks, not high traction packed clay or carpet racing. They say it's been tried a million times and Traxxas just doesn't do well on high traction carpet tracks. I'm still determined to try.
    Last edited by Spharticus; 11-16-2018 at 08:32 AM.

  16. #16
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spharticus View Post
    I race on indoor carpet, and I'm still trying to get it dialed in. The way I document changes is with setup sheets. I keep several sheets for different track tunes.
    https://traxxas.com/pitpass/setupsheets
    My biggest issue on my local indoor carpet track is traction rolling on tight turns. I've dropped the car as low as aftermarket parts will allow, and I still have problems traction rolling. Also, the car has no brakes compared to my race quality cars. It bugs me that there is no way to adjust the brakes with the stock ESC. I'm swapping the ESC soon with a race quality ESC just to get better braking. I've gotten the car to where it won't roll on most turns if I stay off the gas until the car is through the turn, and by being very smooth with my race lines and throttle/brake control. Whenever I get aggressive with my turn in and throttle, the car will traction roll every time. It for sure doesn't handle as well as my Mod class Team C buggy, or my AE Stadium truck. It's probably asking too much for a “basher class” car, but I'm still determined to try. Most racers at the track just shake their heads at me for trying to make a Traxxas fast on carpet. The general opinion is that it's not possible. They say Traxxas cars are for bashing or for loose outdoor tracks, not high traction packed clay or carpet racing. They say it's been tried a million times and Traxxas just doesn't do well on high traction carpet tracks. I'm still determined to try.
    Since I've never seen a separate thread from you on your truck, I've been reluctant to hijack someone else's thread to answer some of your questions, or offer some suggestions. So, to keep this simple, and re-direct from MAC FAB's thread, you should check out the info I have here https://forums.traxxas.com/showthrea...et-Track-Slash for a good 2WD Slash carpet setup. I also have a link within that thread to my carpet track Rustler that should be very helpful as well - the setups are very similar.
    Knowledge gained is lost forever if not passed on.

  17. #17
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    I've been on here for a few years but haven't figured out multi quote. :^/ Anyhow, weight bias of my car is 50/50 with the battery, from a drop of 18", for a static evaluation, it was perfect. Didn't bottom out and went right back to its ride height. Going to keep the cat in the bag for a bit, look harder. You also need to realize this has 5" of travel out back, just shy of 3-3/4" up front. I'll add .02 to what would work on the track, those with practical wisdom will poke fun at it. All good. As for links, I don't think we've crossed the line, brings more good traffic for eveyone. No product sales pitches, purely information. Razor and Nick, be ready for a barrage of questions, I have a bunch regarding the track.

    Someone showed me this recently as well: Mac, first I clicked on the "quotation +" sign in the lower right corner of your reply (it is the little "+ sign next to the "reply" and the "reply with quote", when you hover over the mouse icon over it says "multi quote this message".) After clicking on that little sign, click on the next quotation/reply you want to quote in your reply. That's it.

    So if you want to put two messages in your reply, like I did with this message, I first scrolled to your message you wrote starting, "I've been on here for a few..." and I clicked on the little quotation box with the quotes inside with the + sign next to it and then I scrolled to your other reply and clicked on the normal "Reply With Quote" and then I am typing this message.

    I hope this helps, I may have confused myself. j/k

    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Good starting point evaluation, Synnergy.



    That statement is the key to everything. IMHO you can use the other formulas to get you where you think you should be, but just like 1:1, what I thought I saw and what actually was were two different things, video doesn't lie. This car is IRS, trailing arms (not a solid axle), desert race shock tune, not for the track. Rear first. Suspension is packing, the result of one of 2 things: not stiff enough springs (too much preload to get ride height on too soft of a spring so the shock doesn't react quick enough, thus a slow spring) or bad valving. Springs got a little more preload (they had nothing), valving (50/50 standard valving) was the major problem. Compression was finally set to 1 hole on the piston, rebound now has 3, 2 larger holes than the compression side with bypass valving. Went from 30wt to 25wt and the rear was fixed. Added 1 preload spacer to the front to stiffen the initial inertia hit and it was golden. Prior to shooting video, it appeared to be a compression problem, not a rebound issue. Everything I did made performance worse. Slo mo video is your best friend, for tuning or driving evaluation. How many of you track guys do this???
    I plan on doing some video when I get my rcs to the carpet...I think video is a must. That stretch of dirt from your video looked really good for evaluation purposes. I'd like to see some side and rear video as well as some video "zoomed in". The travel you have is BOSS and that rc is RAD.
    MTFBWY

  18. #18
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    So riddle me this carpet guys, being that I don't know jack about your rules or course dynamics. I briefly scanned your parts on your son's rig, FlyingTigerDad. 1) How is it that you don't run a stiffer spring on the outside front corner, its an oval, right? 2) Is it legal to to change your camber link location so you can modify your camber as the suspension cycles with weight transfer as you go around the track for tire contact patch, or if that is even an issue? Is it legal to put stagger in the car like 1:1 does, either in the wheels or in the arms (oval)? How do you fine tune the suspension in this environment. I get it that you are just about dragging the chassis from the start to drop the cg.

  19. #19
    RC Qualifier FlyingTigerDad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    So riddle me this carpet guys, being that I don't know jack about your rules or course dynamics. I briefly scanned your parts on your son's rig, FlyingTigerDad. 1) How is it that you don't run a stiffer spring on the outside front corner, its an oval, right? 2) Is it legal to to change your camber link location so you can modify your camber as the suspension cycles with weight transfer as you go around the track for tire contact patch, or if that is even an issue? Is it legal to put stagger in the car like 1:1 does, either in the wheels or in the arms (oval)? How do you fine tune the suspension in this environment. I get it that you are just about dragging the chassis from the start to drop the cg.
    The two tracks that I frequent are an indoor "off road" carpet track, and an outdoor dirt off road track. The outdoor track does have a dirt oval as well, but I've never run there, only the off road track. So, I'm kind of with you in not knowing much about their oval setups. I can help elaborate on the rules for the off road tracks, though. First, its usually only a very specific Slash Spec class that allows little to no changes of anything - typically shock oil, springs (as long as they're factory) and any suspension settings that are available with a box stock truck, and that's it. Many places even require stock tires. The off road tracks that I run on don't have this type of class. I race my Rustler in a "Modified Stadium Truck" class, where the rules are few and simple. You must run the appropriate sized (2.2" stadium truck) wheels & tires, the correct body for the class (no car bodies on a truck - things like that), and a 2S LiPo - that's pretty much it. The truck does have to be within the proper ROAR rules for width (13" max) wheelbase (9"-11.5" range, if I remember right), and weight minimums, but otherwise, everything else is fair game to modify or run whatever. It's pretty much the same for all other types of off road racing vehicles as well - 2WD & 4WD buggy's, 2WD & 4WD short course trucks, etc. With of course, the proper wheels/tires, bodies and dimensions for their respective vehicle type class. The sub-classes for each vehicle type are typically "stock" and "expert, or super stock". These classes are determined by the type of motor run (17.5T for stock, and 13.5T for expert, or super stock) and require "zero timing", or "blinky mode" on the ESC (motor timing is allowed), but again, everything else is fair game to modify and run.

    While I've always thought your builds have been awesome, and your fabrication skills excellent, I'm not quite sure what your looking for in terms of setup. Strictly speaking, this vehicle wouldn't fit into any "normal" off road racing class, other than perhaps a "rock racer" type of racing, which I'm unfamiliar with as well since they have their own unique race courses that I have never seen anywhere near me. If your just looking to make this rig work on an off road type of track for fun, I have tremendous experience with that, and can suggest many things that should help you towards that goal.

    P.S. - I'll post some basic, and pretty "standard" off road setup info later to answer your last question(s). In the meantime, here are the type of tracks that I run on with my Rustler, my wife's Rustler and my son's 2WD Slash.

    Last edited by FlyingTigerDad; 11-16-2018 at 06:21 PM.
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  20. #20
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    My tune is desert racing designed. A friend and I were pushing real hard for desert racing, geared primarily towards scratch builds, Trophy Truck in particular. We had a group of builders from across the US ready to get together out near Plaster City, just before the introduction of the Baja Rey. Losi hooked up with an offroad video group to kick it off with us, according to James the video guy. They wanted a bash session, so the TT guys backed out (10-13 lb rigs don't send it very well) . Indirectly, we assumed Losi was going to pick it up and promote it, guess not, no races yet. So I can easily go 35 mph through all kinds of crazy rough stuff, and my true Slash OEM cannot even come close. But the buggy won't be seen at the SC track either.......

  21. #21
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    Basic set up for a while on mine has been

    Front: blue springs (Losi I think) 45 weight oil and 2 hole pistons. Does bottom out a bit off jumps if it gets enough air but not to the point that it bothers me. If its 2 feet off the ground it has minimal impact if any and recovers quickly.

    Rear: unknown red springs, 60 weight oil and 2 hole pistons. The rear end on these cars is such a pain with all the weight.
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  22. #22
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    I'm pretty sure I have all the aftermarket hop up parts sorted out. What I'm looking for are detailed "setup sheet" specs for carpet racing. https://traxxas.com/pitpass/setupsheets What are your camber and toe measurements, shock positions, Shock length, shock limiters, shim thickness' and positions, ride height front and rear, Battery brand, c rating, position & weight. What ROAR spec motor are you running, and in what class? What are your spur and pinion gear tooth and final drive ratios? What is the "race ready" weight of your cars? That sort of stuff.

  23. #23
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    But what if you can't find or there aren't any setup sheets available, and YOU have to figure it out? Could you do it??? How would you figure out or know where you start? The subject gets deep, very quickly.

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    If for some reason you have to figure it out yourself, start with putting the proper tires on for the track and then read this and start here. Once I read this and started tuning the suspension in my trucks this way, it revolutionized the way my trucks handled at said track and made the tuning process much easier.

    https://www.rctech.net/forum/electri...ber-links.html

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  25. #25
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    Asking for setups and using setups sheets can cause you more headaches .. What works for one doesn't work for everyone.. In my case my only local track that is usable is a homemade 1/8 scale buggy track with 2.5 foot high jumps on course dirt and stone .. Also your driving style has alot do with your setup and I drive like controlled chaos but too each his or her own..

  26. #26
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    Sorry TorqueRanger, I disagree. In my experience I have found setup sheets to be VERY useful in carpet racing. How would it cause headaches? It's easy to change suspension settings and try out other people's track setups. in 3 hours, I was able to try out three different people's setup sheets and found one setup that made the car handle better than it ever has.....with lap time improvements to prove the setup was better. I have a couple of podium winning cars that started with setup sheets I downloaded from team members that race the same car on the same surface. If you use a persons setup sheet that's a verified racer and win's sanctioned races you can't really go wrong. It's not like driving style varies so drastically that a car will perform well for one person, and not another. If the car is set up properly, it will perform well for ANYBODY that drives it. Now if you have bad driving habits where instead of trying to improve your driving skills, you overcompensate with car adjustments. IMO, THAT is the cause for headaches. Plus, if you "sneeze" and plow your car into a wall at the end of a strait, (Which requires rebuilding the car), how would you get the car back to exactly the same setup you had before the crash? IMO if you don't track your suspension measurements/setup, you won't ever be a consistent race winner.
    Last edited by Spharticus; 12-07-2018 at 01:42 PM.

  27. #27
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    On another note, here is a link to a database of setup sheets, for a very large variety of "Race quality" RC cars.

    http://www.petitrc.com/index.php?/setupsheet.html/

    Notice a brand that is missing...... Traxxas, why do you think that is? Is it because Traxxas vehicles can't win races? Are Traxxas owners are the only ones that think setup sheets are a waste of time? IDK, but personally, I'd like to help change that.

  28. #28
    RC Qualifier MAC FAB's Avatar
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    Setup sheets nearly eliminate the learning curve, giving a starting point for those who have no idea so to speak, where to begin. Conditons and driver skill add variables to the equation. So how do you improve the tune over the setup sheets? What are you doing above and beyond these?

  29. #29
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    At my local track I dominated with my slash beating tlr and Associated trucks. I also have a buddy that lives out in Texas that did the same thing. He dominated at his local track with his slash. A slash can win races. It's all about setup and driving ability.

    He and I race on almost identical track surfaces, so we would trade setup tips and ideas.

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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC FAB View Post
    Setup sheets nearly eliminate the learning curve, giving a starting point for those who have no idea so to speak, where to begin. Conditons and driver skill add variables to the equation. So how do you improve the tune over the setup sheets? What are you doing above and beyond these?
    Personally, If I think a change is needed, I make one small change at a time, noting the change in pencil on my setup sheet, if it makes it worse, I go back to what it was, and go the opposite direction, if it works and makes it drive better, great. Then go another step in the same direction, if it gets worse, stop and go back one setting to where it was best. make a note on the setup sheet of the new setting. Once I have a few changes made in pencil and I don't think I will be messing with those settings for a while, I'll print out a new setup sheet with the new semi permanent changes made. I keep at least two past printed versions of the setup sheets as well as the original in case I want to go back to the original specs and start over. Something like changing the rear anti-squat settings or ride height can make the suspension act very different, and may require an oil viscosity change, spring change, or shock position change. Each time a change is made, I keep track the average lap times. If I'm having an "Off day" and I know I'm not driving well, I try not to make any changes to the car unless it's just end points or expo on the controller. When the track changes the layout, a new baseline average lap time needs to be established to use as a benchmark for further test and tuning. I keep a small notebook for each car, and write a journal of what changes were made that day, and why. Tire wear can effect the handling, so a Fresh set of tires is used at the baseline tune before any changes are made.
    Last edited by Spharticus; 12-11-2018 at 12:08 PM.

  31. #31
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    I raced on medium/higher medium bite outdoor clay. Traxxas GTR shocks with 35wt Losi oil front, 30wt rear, stock black springs f/r, 3900kv motor, Hobbywing ESC, Proline Pro-Trac suspension, Traxxas LCG chassis, Proline Soft Calibers rear, soft Holeshots front, no swaybars (drives better without them), Losi 22SCT 2.0 body with all air vents cut out, Spektrum DX4C radio, brake at 100% on the ESC, but at 65% on the radio (almost like anti-lock brakes), SMC 5200mah 70c 2s battery, stock 2075 servo with Savox 0231 metal gears installed, RPM front and rear bumpers. I don't remember what my f/r chassis height was, but a-arms f/r were flat.

    This truck is on Rails compared to my tlr 22sct 2.0 rear motor that can be kind of squirrelly at times. The slash is much more planted and the rear rotates so much more easily and predictably then the tlr truck. The slash is a little heavier which I believe helps it to be more planted and easier to drive. I really don't have any under or over steer. Both the Slash and the tlr jump and Fly level and respond easily to throttle or brake input in the air.

    I can drive the slash harder, but the tlr does have more steering, hence it can take or make tighter turns into corners, but I can go into a corner harder and faster with the Slash and get on the throttle mid-corner where the tlr has to be babied more. Granted, I probably put more money into the Slash to get it to this point compared to the cost of the tlr, but the slash is more fun to drive, go figure.

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    Last edited by MaXDee; 12-11-2018 at 12:15 PM.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaXDee View Post
    At my local track I dominated with my slash beating tlr and Associated trucks. I also have a buddy that lives out in Texas that did the same thing. He dominated at his local track with his slash. A slash can win races. It's all about setup and driving ability.

    He and I race on almost identical track surfaces, so we would trade setup tips and ideas.

    Sent from my LM-G710VM using Tapatalk
    I'm interested to hear more about your setup that you say was beating race spec cars. Are you racing on dirt or carpet? In my experience at my local carpet track, mid motor cars/trucks dominate. On dirt you don't have as much traction, so more weight to the rear is needed, hence rear motor cars do well. On carpet, traction is very high and it seems rear motor cars/trucks have very poor "on throttle" steering. The car won't turn well if I'm on the gas. There are no anti-squat settings, so it seems I'm stuck with what Traxxas has it set it at. The truck is heavy as **** as it is, so I'm hesitant to add weight to the front to get better "on throttle" steering. I am also having a very hard time with traction rolling on every turn. I've dropped the ride height as low as it will go with the current parts, and I still can't seem to keep the truck from rolling over on every tight turn.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaXDee View Post
    I raced on medium/higher medium bite outdoor clay. Traxxas GTR shocks with 35wt Losi oil front, 30wt rear, stock black springs f/r, 3900kv motor, Hobbywing ESC, Proline Pro-Trac suspension, Traxxas LCG chassis, Proline Soft Calibers rear, soft Holeshots front, no swaybars (drives better without them), Losi 22SCT 2.0 body with all air vents cut out, Spektrum DX4C radio, brake at 100% on the ESC, but at 65% on the radio (almost like anti-lock brakes), SMC 5200mah 70c 2s battery, stock 2075 servo with Savox 0231 metal gears installed, RPM front and rear bumpers.

    This truck is on Rails compared to my tlr 22sct 2.0 rear motor that can be kind of squirrelly at times. The slash is much more planted and the rear rotates so much more easily and predictably then the tlr truck. The slash is a little heavier which I believe helps it to be more planted and easier to drive. I really don't have any under or over steer. Both the Slash and the tlr jump and Fly level and respond easily to throttle or brake input in the air.

    I can drive the slash harder, but the tlr does have more steering, hence it can take or make tighter turns into corners, but I can go into a corner harder and faster with the Slash and get on the throttle mid-corner where the tlr has to be babied more. Granted, I probably put more money into the Slash to get it to this point compared to the cost of the tlr, but the slash is more fun to drive, go figure.

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    Thanks for your reply, It sounds like you got her dialed in for clay. I wish I could find more "carpet muncher" Traxxas drivers to exchange setup tips with.
    Last edited by Spharticus; 12-11-2018 at 12:19 PM.

  34. #34
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    Indoor on carpet the tlr reigned Supreme because of the lighter weight and better steering. I only raced the tlr five or six times before the track closed. I retuned it for the outdoor track, but I still turn faster lap times with the Slash.

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  35. #35
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    Sorry I can't be more help to you with a slash carpet setup

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaXDee View Post
    Sorry I can't be more help to you with a slash carpet setup

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    That's ok, it's probably a lost cause for me anyway. My track doesn't even run an SCT class anymore because nobody local can stand how the SCT trucks handle and they all say the trucks sound like a garbage truck when they land jumps. Currently, the largest classes at my track are the 17.5T 2wd buggy, Pro mod 2wd buggy, 13.5T Stadium Truck, and 4WD Mod buggy. I may just have to take my Slash back to a basher status till something changes.

  37. #37
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    Any chances of you picking up a used tlr stadium truck?

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaXDee View Post
    Any chances of you picking up a used tlr stadium truck?

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    Sorry, Probably not. Unless your willing to practically give it away. I have Nine race cars total (At the moment), two of which I need to get new electronics in for before I buy a new chassis.

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