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  1. #1
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    Being new and probably a dumb question.

    I bought a Traxxas slash with brushed motor...haven't yet done anything besides open the box. years ago I had an old pan car, and it had no slipper clutch. Why is it there? I've seen slipper clutch eliminators and was thinking of putting one on for less rotating weight. What would be the advantages and disadvantages of doing this. I m sure its something I'm not seeing...but why is there even a clutch on an electric motor car. Not like a nitro that keeps running while stopped. Thanks in advance for setting an old dummy straight!!

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier Rich2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goleft View Post
    I bought a Traxxas slash with brushed motor...haven't yet done anything besides open the box. years ago I had an old pan car, and it had no slipper clutch. Why is it there? I've seen slipper clutch eliminators and was thinking of putting one on for less rotating weight. What would be the advantages and disadvantages of doing this. I m sure its something I'm not seeing...but why is there even a clutch on an electric motor car. Not like a nitro that keeps running while stopped. Thanks in advance for setting an old dummy straight!!
    Keep in mind a nitro truck has very little horsepower and torque at idle, whereas an electric motor
    has full torque and horsepower that can rip everything apart off idle. A slipper clutch helps control
    this, plus save parts when landing fromjumps. Just a couple of reasons for a slipper.

  3. #3
    Traxxas Marshal
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    Originally, the Stampede, Rustler, and Bandit didn't have a slipper clutch; this was back in the days of the Stinger motor, a motor that was lacking in the power department. As time went on (late 90s), the slipper clutch started becoming more and more common as motors started becoming more powerful. Traxxas started offering the slipper clutch as an optional part for kits and standard equipment for RTR models around then. Nowadays, slipper clutches are standard equipment.

    As Rich2 said, the electric motors of today have a good bit of power. A properly adjusted slipper is helpful in preserving the life of your drive train.

    It's worth noting that nitro vehicles typically have two clutches, one of which is a slipper clutch.
    Last edited by cooleocool; 12-25-2018 at 07:27 PM.
    "Happiness depends upon ourselves." -Aristotle

  4. #4
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    Ok thank you both. Guess I'm gonna get rid of it for now until I start trashing too much stuff.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by goleft View Post
    Ok thank you both. Guess I'm gonna get rid of it for now until I start trashing too much stuff.
    Tighten the slipper (you can test it by holding the truck and hitting the throttle to be sure its tight enough)
    This way you can sort of see what its like with no slip. Gives you the ability to do wheelies etc, a little more stress on the drive line but my son's slash has been running with the slipper locked up (fully tightened) and had zero issues on a 21T brushed motor.

    -Liberty

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by goleft View Post
    I bought a Traxxas slash with brushed motor...haven't yet done anything besides open the box. years ago I had an old pan car, and it had no slipper clutch. Why is it there? I've seen slipper clutch eliminators and was thinking of putting one on for less rotating weight. What would be the advantages and disadvantages of doing this. I m sure its something I'm not seeing...but why is there even a clutch on an electric motor car. Not like a nitro that keeps running while stopped. Thanks in advance for setting an old dummy straight!!
    Just to add onto what everybody else said. Road cars typically don't have slippers because they don't jump. If you are only running the truck on dirt/loose surfaces, you can get away with no slipper or have it fully locked down. If you are jumpin' or racing the truck on carpet or any other high traction surface, you should have the slipper installed and have it adjusted properly to prevent tearing up your trans gears. If you are in the air and hit full throttle, the motor is going full tilt and the tires suddenly stop when they hit the high traction surface with the motor going full blast. Sudden stops will break parts faster than anything else. lol. Also if you are not running a slipper, you do NOT want to keep hitting the gas when the truck is trapped or stuck, that could also do damage to your gears. If you are carpet racing, you don't want the truck to pop a wheelie because you lose steering control, or it can do a backflip onto it's lid, so most carpet racers adjust the slipper to not allow the truck to pop the front end off the ground.
    Last edited by Spharticus; 01-09-2019 at 04:15 PM.

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