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  1. #1
    RC Enthusiast
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    reverse not working at times and radio????

    folks i've got a couple of questions and maybe you can help me out.
    i've noticed this on my sons old Slash but also on his new Tactical Unit, sometimes his reverse on the handheld doesn't engage the reverse on either car, of course we use separate controls for both but just wondering what we may be doing wrong?

    Also, the Tactical Units steering servo went out a week after we got it and now Traxxas has sent us another one, what is the proper way to set the steering on the servo as i know you don't want to bog down the servo one way or another?
    Thank you

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier
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    First off, the trx-4 eats servos. It has no servo saver so that’s why that happens. No biggie, upgrade to some savox servo or aftermarket brand of your choosing. That reverse issue can be due to the fact that your car must come to a full stop before the esc will allow reverse motion. If you find that your car is completely stopped, and reverse is not working, I would look into the esc’s manual and see if you can troubleshoot. If not, you can always call traxxas’ Support line. They have helped me and will help you.

  3. #3
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    The reverse issue...
    It sounds like your son's controller has an issue, but more information is needed. How much into the throttle is he putting into remote when it is not going in reverse? What modes are the ESCs in? Do you have brakes when the remote is pushed in the reverse direction? If reverse is done twice (reverse, back to nuetrual, then back to reverse), do the trucks go in reverse?

    The servo...
    VERY few trucks like the TRX4 come with a servo saver, and really is not the reason why the servos fail. Traxxas improved on its 2075 servo by adding metal gears, but it is still only rated at 125oz, which is just not enough for a hefty rig like this. Historically, one of three failures end up happening...
    1. The servo strips gears. This is on the rare side, but it has happened.
    2. The servo draws too much amperage and burns out the fuse in the servo. When this happens, everything on your truck will work, but your servo.
    3. The servo draws too much amperage, does not burn out the servo fuse, and cause the ESC's BEC (only rated at 1 amp) to fry, effectively destroying the ESC.
    The solution is two part...
    1st, get a better servo, you want one with at least 200oz for trail running, and at least 300oz for crawling.
    2nd, install an external BEC. You have a couple of different options for this, but the simplest is to buy Traxxas BEC kit, and install it.

    Installing the servo...
    1. Remove the servo horn from the servo. Move the steering back and forth, make sure everything is nice, smooth and loose.
    2. Remove the covers from the RX box.
    3. Unplug and unroute the servo wire run.
    4. Take a picture of how the servo is mounted.
    5. Remove the for screws and remove the servo.
    6. Put the new servo in (like the picture you took), and install the four servo screws.
    7. Route the servo wire run, and plug it into Ch1 on the RX (there are two CH1s, either will do). If your new servo is not from Traxxas, it is likely not keyed, no biggy. The black wire goes closest to the edge of the case, and the white wire closest to the middle. Do not put the RX case together yet.
    8. Turn on the TX, and center the steering trim and EPAs
    9. Plug a battery into the truck and turn it on. Test the servo with the TX, making sure it moves when you turn the wheel on the TX.
    10. Put the radio down...
    With the front wheels of the truck as centered as possible (don't worry if they are not perfect), put the servo horn onto the servo, pressing it down only about half way.
    11. Turn off the truck
    12. Squish the servo horn down the rest of the way, then install the servo screw with just a small amount of blue Loctite. Make sure the servo screw is tight.
    13. Turn on the truck on and test the steering, being careful not to go all of the way in either direction.
    14. Use the trim to center the front wheels. Drive it in a straight line, adjusting the steering trim until it runs as straight as you want it to. Be careful not to make any sharp turns until you get the End Point Adjustment (EPA) set.
    15. With the front wheels off of the bench, turn the truck all of the way in one direction, then adjust the EPA so that the steering goes into the stops, with just a hint of servo whine with the TX's wheel is full in that direction (if the servo is screaming, you need to back off the EPA). Then repeat on the other side.

    A couple of notes...
    A. Another weak point is the plastic servo arm, recommend replacing it with an aluminum Traxxas arm, or aftermarket arm (Traxxas servos are splined to 25T).
    B. If you are using an aftermarket servo, know how many splines it has. You may need to by a servo horn (arm) that has the proper amount of splines. Normally servos will come with 23, 24, or 25t output splines.
    C. If you are running a stronger aftermarket servo, you will be taking a big risk of frying your ESC if you do not use an external BEC.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greatscott View Post
    The reverse issue...
    It sounds like your son's controller has an issue, but more information is needed. How much into the throttle is he putting into remote when it is not going in reverse? What modes are the ESCs in? Do you have brakes when the remote is pushed in the reverse direction? If reverse is done twice (reverse, back to nuetrual, then back to reverse), do the trucks go in reverse?

    The servo...
    VERY few trucks like the TRX4 come with a servo saver, and really is not the reason why the servos fail. Traxxas improved on its 2075 servo by adding metal gears, but it is still only rated at 125oz, which is just not enough for a hefty rig like this. Historically, one of three failures end up happening...
    1. The servo strips gears. This is on the rare side, but it has happened.
    2. The servo draws too much amperage and burns out the fuse in the servo. When this happens, everything on your truck will work, but your servo.
    3. The servo draws too much amperage, does not burn out the servo fuse, and cause the ESC's BEC (only rated at 1 amp) to fry, effectively destroying the ESC.
    The solution is two part...
    1st, get a better servo, you want one with at least 200oz for trail running, and at least 300oz for crawling.
    2nd, install an external BEC. You have a couple of different options for this, but the simplest is to buy Traxxas BEC kit, and install it.

    Installing the servo...
    1. Remove the servo horn from the servo. Move the steering back and forth, make sure everything is nice, smooth and loose.
    2. Remove the covers from the RX box.
    3. Unplug and unroute the servo wire run.
    4. Take a picture of how the servo is mounted.
    5. Remove the for screws and remove the servo.
    6. Put the new servo in (like the picture you took), and install the four servo screws.
    7. Route the servo wire run, and plug it into Ch1 on the RX (there are two CH1s, either will do). If your new servo is not from Traxxas, it is likely not keyed, no biggy. The black wire goes closest to the edge of the case, and the white wire closest to the middle. Do not put the RX case together yet.
    8. Turn on the TX, and center the steering trim and EPAs
    9. Plug a battery into the truck and turn it on. Test the servo with the TX, making sure it moves when you turn the wheel on the TX.
    10. Put the radio down...
    With the front wheels of the truck as centered as possible (don't worry if they are not perfect), put the servo horn onto the servo, pressing it down only about half way.
    11. Turn off the truck
    12. Squish the servo horn down the rest of the way, then install the servo screw with just a small amount of blue Loctite. Make sure the servo screw is tight.
    13. Turn on the truck on and test the steering, being careful not to go all of the way in either direction.
    14. Use the trim to center the front wheels. Drive it in a straight line, adjusting the steering trim until it runs as straight as you want it to. Be careful not to make any sharp turns until you get the End Point Adjustment (EPA) set.
    15. With the front wheels off of the bench, turn the truck all of the way in one direction, then adjust the EPA so that the steering goes into the stops, with just a hint of servo whine with the TX's wheel is full in that direction (if the servo is screaming, you need to back off the EPA). Then repeat on the other side.

    A couple of notes...
    A. Another weak point is the plastic servo arm, recommend replacing it with an aluminum Traxxas arm, or aftermarket arm (Traxxas servos are splined to 25T).
    B. If you are using an aftermarket servo, know how many splines it has. You may need to by a servo horn (arm) that has the proper amount of splines. Normally servos will come with 23, 24, or 25t output splines.
    C. If you are running a stronger aftermarket servo, you will be taking a big risk of frying your ESC if you do not use an external BEC.
    All of your information is correct and full of great information, but I’m gonna have to disagree on the servo thing. Also I’m not saying it’s a bad thing that it doesn’t have a servo savor, but that is why the servos die. You can look around on YouTube and servos that would normally be fine in heavier cars slowly wear out and lose power in the Tex-4 until the motor is just cooked.

  5. #5
    RC Racer
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    Aug 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by usmeagle View Post
    i've noticed this on my sons old Slash but also on his new Tactical Unit, sometimes his reverse on the handheld doesn't engage the reverse on either car, of course we use separate controls for both but just wondering what we may be doing wrong?

    Also, the Tactical Units steering servo went out a week after we got it and now Traxxas has sent us another one, what is the proper way to set the steering on the servo as i know you don't want to bog down the servo one way or another?
    Thank you
    Regarding the reverse issue. Does it not work at all, or is it delayed? If it's not working at all, I would check the drive mode on the esc because some disable reverse (i.e racing mode). If it's delayed, that's "normal". Put the Trx-4 in crawler mode and you'll get instant reverse. I believe the slash might have a sports mode to do the same.

    My son's tactical has the original servo (since June) and my Defender servo went out on the second run. I would highly suggest that everyone check their servo endpoints, even out of the box. I find that the stock endpoints cause the servo to turn slightly too much, putting strain on it and burning them out.

    The stock servo is weak and I'd simply replace it (I recommend the 20kg servos that are cheap on Amazon, but waterproof them yourself if you plan to get them wet).

  6. #6
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peeeenuuutt View Post
    All of your information is correct and full of great information, but Iím gonna have to disagree on the servo thing. Also Iím not saying itís a bad thing that it doesnít have a servo savor, but that is why the servos die. You can look around on YouTube and servos that would normally be fine in heavier cars slowly wear out and lose power in the Tex-4 until the motor is just cooked.
    Well agree to disagree on the servo saver. I have been in the crawler/scaler niche for over 10 years, and the only factory installed servo saver I can remember was on the second generation AX10, which would not allow the steering to work at all on the rocks; you'll be hard-pressed to find a factory rig today that has one, and no one puts them. With the amount of weight on the front end, along with the sticky tires grabbing the rocks, most of the servo's power would be obsorbed into the servo saver, resulting in the steering not turning nearly as tightly as it should. The solution is to install a steering servo that can handle the load, then back the servo up with an ESC BEC or external BEC that can provide it the amperage it needs.

    Now, to play devil's advocate here, there have been rigs that have been produced with servos as weak as the 2075, but they were produced with plastic steering links, and not aluminum like the TRX4. The plastic links acted like a servo saver, cushioning the stress on the servo. The trade off was very sloppy steering and steering that would not turn all of the way when the rig was on the rocks. The first mods for these particular rigs was to install aluminum links, a heavier servo, and an external BEC to power it.
    Last edited by Greatscott; 01-11-2019 at 07:33 PM.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  7. #7
    RC Qualifier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greatscott View Post
    Well agree to disagree on the servo saver. I have been in the crawler/scaler niche for over 10 years, and the only factory installed servo saver I can remember was on the second generation AX10, which would not allow the steering to work at all on the rocks; you'll be hard-pressed to find a factory rig today that has one, and no one puts them. With the amount of weight on the front end, along with the sticky tires grabbing the rocks, most of the servo's power would be obsorbed into the servo saver, resulting in the steering not turning nearly as tightly as it should. The solution is to install a steering servo that can handle the load, then back the servo up with an ESC BEC or external BEC that can provide it the amperage it needs.

    Now, to play devil's advocate here, there have been rigs that have been produced with servos as weak as the 2075, but they were produced with plastic steering links, and not aluminum like the TRX4. The plastic links acted like a servo saver, cushioning the stress on the servo. The trade off was very sloppy steering and steering that would not turn all of the way when the rig was on the rocks. The first mods for these particular rigs was to install aluminum links, a heavier servo, and an external BEC to power it.
    Ahh the plastic steering linkages! Forgot that the Trx-4 is aluminum. Now it makes a lot more sense. Sorry, my bad. Like I said, all of your information is correct! And happy 1 decade of crawling man!

  8. #8
    RC Competitor
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    Sep 2017
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    83
    I would absolutely not recommend installing the Traxxas BEC. For the same $40 that the 2262 sells for you can buy a HobbyWing Quicrun 1080 ESC. The HW1080 is a MUCH better ESC which will not need an external BEC and as a side benefit it just performs better than the stock XL5.
    It's a rock, get over it!

  9. #9
    RC Racer
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    Jul 2018
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    East Detroit
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    I just installed the HW1080 and will second that !
    Way more adjustability than the stock ESC. very easy to setup and tweak ! Plus the option to bump up to a 7.4v servo output with the internal BEC.

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