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  1. #41
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Nitronaught's Avatar
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    I'm wrapping my head around this and really am surprised with all that's happening. On a Blowby principled, non ringed 2 stroke when you change the compression you are also advancing or decreasing the combustion timing. The port timing is only changed with porting.

    I'd love to see a video of this.
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  2. #42
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    Yup. I've altered bolth. I have delayed the intake from closing by a few degrees to increase top end power. Then because the gasoline doesn't react with the platinum element like methanol does I have increased the compression a lot and I need to increase it a little bit more.

    I want make a video but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't had the time yet.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0 View Post
    Yup. I've altered bolth. I have delayed the intake from closing by a few degrees to increase top end power. Then because the gasoline doesn't react with the platinum element like methanol does I have increased the compression a lot and I need to increase it a little bit more.

    I want make a video but I have been pretty busy lately and haven't had the time yet.
    You delayed the intake from closing? How did you do that?
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  4. #44
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    I filed away some metal on the crankshaft intake where it regulates when air can enter to delay the closing.

  5. #45
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    You changed crank timing not port timing. Why mess with any timing (crank or port) if you haven't gotten the motor to run more than a minute or so? i would have thought it would have been easier to get the conversion working first and then change timings. If you delayed crank closing to much you will get blow-back through carb and also lose vacuum for the diaphragm carb to work.
    I'm still trying to figure out how you got a walbro style carb to work as the carb bore would be the same size as the piston.

    Some pictures would be helpful, as i'm starting to think this endeavor didn't work out so good.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzly03 View Post
    You changed crank timing not port timing. Why mess with any timing (crank or port) if you haven't gotten the motor to run more than a minute or so? i would have thought it would have been easier to get the conversion working first and then change timings. If you delayed crank closing to much you will get blow-back through carb and also lose vacuum for the diaphragm carb to work.
    I'm still trying to figure out how you got a walbro style carb to work as the carb bore would be the same size as the piston.

    Some pictures would be helpful, as i'm starting to think this endeavor didn't work out so good.
    Agreed, the only way you could retard the port timing would be to drop the position of the port. That means the original port would have to be filled at the top and then cut open towards the bottom.

    Taking away from the crankshaft in that manner would not just affect the air intake, fuel would also be affected.

    Do me favor, whip up a video of this engine even trying to run. I just have to see and hear this.

    The increase in compression.... Not getting that one either. Pretty sure you would want 8.5:1-10:1 compression ratio for decent combustion.

    This is a blowby, ringless, ABC sleeved engine in which both exhaust and intake ports are open at the same time... So please show a video of this cause I'm not conviced this is even possible with what you are saying. No offense but I'm not picking up what you are laying down...
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  7. #47
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    Sorry my explanation was bad on what I did on the intake. I adjusted the rotary valve part portion of the crankshaft to adjust the intake timing not the port on the sleeve. The crank timing was only changed by a two or three degrees so there would be some additional blow back at low RPMs but it gave the engine a ton more top end power.

    You need about a 7:1- 10:1 if you don't have a spark plug. Because these glow plugs are not optimized for gasoline, the engine is basically running on a glow plug assisted detonation where roughly a 13:1 compression is needed.

    I may have time tomorrow to pull out the revo and take a video but I have been pretty busy lately. I will make a video at some point though. There's honestly not much to hear because the engine sounds the exact same as it did in nitro. Also the only visible change is a massive carb nearly the size of the engine itself.

    Really this conversation is so close to being done but I haven't had the time these past 2 weeks. All that needs done is a slight increase in compression, mount the cooling fan, seal my carb adapter where it's leaking around the engine, and make the adapter for the air filter.
    Last edited by Bob2.0; 10-25-2019 at 06:57 PM.

  8. #48
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    A thought came to me yesterday that I could possibly ceramic coat the cylinder head and top of the piston to keep the engine cooler. I looked into it and theoretically with the ceramic coating the amount of heat absorbed into the cylinder head could be reduced by 40%. With those numbers I may not need the cooling fan. Then without the cooling fan I also wouldn't need the small 200mah 2s battery for the fan, the fan mount, and the thermometer for the fan. Removing all that could save me over 100g or 1/5lb. If I can find someone with an air brush I could ceramic coat those parts for about $35 if I cant find and air brush I may also need to buy a cheap $50 airbrush. If anyone has thoughts on this or experience with ceramic coatings let me know.

  9. #49
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    Here is a link to a Google doc with images of the gasoline revo. The images aren't very good so I will try and update them soon. (I hope the link works)


    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...t?usp=drivesdk
    Last edited by Bob2.0; 10-28-2019 at 11:22 AM.

  10. #50
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    I have updated all the photos so they are not blurry.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...t?usp=drivesdk

  11. #51
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    Impressive!! Nice job on mounting. I had a hard time seeing the carb mounted. I don't think ceramic coating would help with this style motor. These engines don't have rings and require parts to expand together to create the needed seal for compression.

  12. #52
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    The ceramic coating would only be on the cylinder head and top of the piston. So the ceramic coating would never come in contact with the piston skirt or cylinder sleeve. It should help deflect an extra ~25% of the heat back into the gasses in the cylinder helping the engine run cooler.

  13. #53
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    I'm no nitro guy, but i am into full size motors. I am enjoying what you are doing here, but i wonder if ceramic coating on the piston would throw off the balance. I'd assume those little motors have to crank out some high rpms right? So i would suspect you'd need to lighten your piston the same amount as what the coating would weigh for motor longevity.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk

  14. #54
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    If you put ceramic on the cylinder head, how would the head cool the engine if it wasn't allowed to absorb heat? How hot does the engine get? Could you be running too lean? I know that air/fuel mixture plays a role in engine heat, whether it's a full size engine or a model size.
    I'm glad your still pursuing this project and not giving up.

    If I were to do a conversion from rc nitro fuel to gasoline I would be trying to keep things simple. I have a habit of "overthinking or over-engineering". I would go spark ignition, easier to control timing. Then I would use the Traxxas rpm sensor and flywheel for the ignition trigger. For the carb I would probably use an OS 11k carb, it's a three needle setup and would fit the TRX engines. This is the route I would take as it seems it would be the simplest to try.

  15. #55
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    how lean you run the engine does affect temperature but the engine can only go so rich before it dose not run run properly.

    As to simple engineering the cdi ignition units can not handle the high rpm that the trx 3.3 runs at. I have looked and the highest rpm CDI unit I can find tops out at 30,000 rpm. Plus the CDI unit would require a separate battery along with the mounting for the sensor. As for the carb it really needs something to regulate fuel pressure. When I was running the stock trx 3.3 carb on gasoline, fuel pressure difference when cornering was enough to change the fuel mixture enough to kill the engine. Because of that I went to the diaphragm carb instead of trying to modify the original carb. I haven't had the fuel pressure problems with the new carb and its very easy to tune.

    Finally this still doesn't solve the biggest problem of over heating. I saw a youtube video a while back where a guy converted a revo 3.3 to gasoline with a cdi and he still had heat problems. Many other people and companies have converted nitro engines to gasoline and they all have problems with heat so I don't think it is a by-product of compression/glow ignition.
    Last edited by Bob2.0; 10-31-2019 at 08:03 AM.

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve g View Post
    I'm no nitro guy, but i am into full size motors. I am enjoying what you are doing here, but i wonder if ceramic coating on the piston would throw off the balance. I'd assume those little motors have to crank out some high rpms right? So i would suspect you'd need to lighten your piston the same amount as what the coating would weigh for motor longevity.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
    I did the math and based on the manufactures specs the ceramic coating would increase the weight of the piston by about .007 grams. I don't think that small of a weight difference would create too big of a problem, but I could be wrong.

  17. #57
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    Any progress? I would like to see a video of this thing running as I'm having a harder time believing this engine conversion is working out as your describing. I know converting a glow engine to gasoline can be done and has been done, but the direction you have gone has totally confused me. The issues i'm having difficulty with are:

    1. Trying to run this engine at your claimed 55k rpm is unrealistic. Practical RPM's are going to be much lower. Running different fuels has its own challenges.
    2. Walbro WT type carbs use crankcase pulse pressure to run the fuel pump. I'm not sure how it is even working as a draw through carb.
    3. Your compression ratio theory is confusing. Higher octane fuels allow for higher compression and more advanced timing. Gasoline has a lower octane rating than Methanol(RC glow fuel). So by raising compression that would introduce preignition and detonation.

    To control the heat issue you would need to find a better way of heat absorption and heat transfer. An engine this small would probably work best with water cooling, as I think that would be the smallest package. Trying to air cool fuel with 2x the btu's would more than double the surface area required. i.e. bigger cooling head.

    I found an article which may help you. Gasoline, Methanol, & Nitromethane Fuel Comparison

  18. #58
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    Not to discourage the innovation and time spent, but if converting a nitro engine to gasoline is done "simply" (I know it is not that simple, but overall a carb change and machining the head) by the steps you've taken, do you not think that Traxxas, HPI, Losi and others would have at least tried this out as well? I would think that with their large[r] R&D budgets and other resources IF they were successful we would have 3.3cc gasser in the stores. But all the 1/10 - 1/8 gasoline engines put out by Traxxas's competitors have been wrecks.
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  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0 View Post
    I have updated all the photos so they are not blurry.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...t?usp=drivesdk
    Shoot I was hoping you had pics of the crank modifying and stuff. Come on you mean you are doing this project and didn't take pics of that?



    How are you changing the intake timing from the crankshaft? There's no way, sure you increase the amount of fuel and make the fuel flow smoother, but you aren't changing the timeing. The fuel pressure in the casing or the amount of fuel flow can be affected this way.

    I've been bashing, racing, engine building, mod'ing these IPS shaft, blowby, ringless engines for some time.... I'm just not picking up what you're laying down man.

    Could you show us pics of what you've done to the internals? How about a video or 2? Cause I just have to see this for my own eyes.
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  20. #60
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    I have been pretty busy lately and I haven't gotten much done.

    I'm Sorry about the 55k rpm claim. I misread an article that Traxxas posted about the trx 3.3 engine a while ago.(https://www.rc-trucks.org/traxxas-trx-3.3.htm) In the article they said the engine approached 50k rpm and I did port the engine for more top end power so maybe it could reach those rpms. But In normal use the engine probably won't ever pass 40k rpm.

    I read the same thing that some diaphragm carbs pump with the pulses but my carb doesn't, it uses a very small venturi. I have seen a 4-stroke weed trimmer carb that has nearly no venturi and has a line running to the crankcase so I wonder if it is that you are thinking of.

    My compression ratio is confusing to most people. Standard glow engines use a platinum glow plug with other materials that acts as a catalyst specifically engineered for methenol. That catalyst doesn't work the same for gasoline. Because of that you need to increase compression or run a gasoline optimized glow plug like the OS G5 glow plug.

    I think I have a few pics of the 2.5 porting job I did for practice before I upgraded to the 3.3. I did a very comparable porting job on the two engines but I think I did a better job on the 3.3.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...t?usp=drivesdk

    I added the photos I have of the trx 2.5 porting job I did. It doesn't show the crank timing though
    Last edited by Double G; 11-05-2019 at 12:43 PM. Reason: merge, clutter reduction

  21. #61
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    Hey Bob2.0, So far I see no proof, no evidence you are getting that engine running on gas. Until then I say fowl. With all due respect I'm finding this a hard pill to swallow and I'd love to see someone with a TRX blowby, 2 stroke ringless engine run on gas any day. So let's see some video's.

    There's no way you are changing the intake timing by doing anything with the crankshaft.... So let's see this gas engine run. So far all's I've seen are mods I've done 100 times. Been in the R/C racing game and bashing since 2004 and online here since 2005.

    So,,, surprise me.
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  22. #62
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    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...t?usp=drivesdk

    I added a diagram to the doc on how to delay the intake closing for more top end power for those of you that didn't already know how. If you want more information read the 2- stroke tuners handbook. That is where I got most of my info on porting my engine and it gave me a better idea on how to convert the engine to gasoline.

    As I have previously stated I will make a video soon, I just haven't had the time yet. I'm sure many of you have had busy times in your life when you don't have much free time and understand.

  23. #63
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    Look at what I found on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A19b56_AR8E.

    Nitronaught, I'm not sure what you mean by blowby engine? These engines are a rotary valve type of 2-stroke.

    Bob, you are a little off about what changing the crank intake timing does. Changing the timing of intake duration on the crank moves the peak power around on the RPM range not directly add more power. Also the mods you have done, are affecting the efficiency of the engine. You haven't changed any port timings or size of a port window.

    I'm really curious on the the intake part of your project. Still wrapping my head around how you got the carb to work. If the venturi is bigger than the stock carb you lose negative pressure(suction). Delaying the crank from closing also added more blowback(less suction).

  24. #64
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    By delaying the intake from closing you can shift the power band to higher rpms. At peak torque, every revolution produces the same amount of power no matter the rpm that peak torque is created at. So if your engines power band is 5k rpm higher the engine will produce 15-20% more power. Most manufacturers don't push the power band higher because at low rpm it causes blow backs that decreases the low end power. To counter act this power loss you can add "fangs" to the sleeve and that can boost low end power by about 20-30%. You do need to be careful not to delay the intake to much or it will kill efficiency. To also counter act efficiency losses that may come from The altered crank timing, the crank is lightened and shaped to vaporize and mix the fuel better which makes combustion more efficient, makes tuning easier, and make the engine hold a tune longer.

    The only noticeable "suction" loss is When starting the engine. The choke defiantly helps but sometimes I still need to block the intake with my finger to help pull more fuel to the engine. Once the engine is started the airflow is enough that it has never has had problems with with the slightly larger venturi.

  25. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0
    Nitronaught, I'm not sure what you mean by blowby engine? These engines are a rotary valve type of 2-stroke.
    A blowby Nitro engine means that at one point the piston is in a position in where the intake port and the exhaust port of the sleeve is open at the same time.

    The youtube link shows very little as most of them do. But if you can get pump gas 2 stroke out of it to run decently I take my hat off to you.

    I'm still skeptical.
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  26. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitronaught View Post
    A blowby Nitro engine means that at one point the piston is in a position in where the intake port and the exhaust port of the sleeve is open at the same time...
    Thanks. Never heard someone describe an engine as one. I use piston port(piston only), reed valve(check valve), or rotary valve(adjustable) based on the intake type when I describe.

    ...The youtube link shows very little as most of them do...
    I just happened to find that video. I thought it was a cool clip. Mainly I posted the link as it was showing it could run on spark and to give an example of how I would have gone about the conversion. I'm not sure how reliable it was either, but it was a cool experiment for someone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0 View Post
    ... if your engines power band is 5k rpm higher the engine will produce 15-20% more power...add "fangs" to the sleeve and that can boost low end power by about 20-30%...
    A thought process like this doesn't help your case. It makes me believe your knowledge on how engines work and operate is limited. As Double G pointed out if it were that easy everyone would be doing it, from model engines all the way to industrial engines.

    Again, I'm glad your having fun and enjoying what your doing. I've always encouraged others to think outside the box and to experiment with their ideas. I just don't see what your describing as working. You have done opposite to what makes an engine run for any length of time. There is a reason why engines with different types of fuel use different types of ignition, along with different types of intakes, along with different cooling setups to match engine size. If it is running for you, congrats. But without proof I remain highly skeptical of your claims.

  27. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzly03
    Thanks. Never heard someone describe an engine as one. I use piston port(piston only), reed valve(check valve), or rotary valve(adjustable) based on the intake type when I describe.
    No problem.... Blowby principled 2 strokes are cheaper to mfr. the lack of valves allows these engines to get up to 38,000 "functional" rpms.
    I hear people speaking of close to 50,000 rpms.. Two words (stretched conrod). There's no way the stock conrod and wrist pin will handle those rpms.
    Also Blowby engines pretty much make superchargers ineffective as the intake pressure from the supercharger just goes directly out the ports.

    Quote Originally Posted by grizzly03
    A thought process like this doesn't help your case. It makes me believe your knowledge on how engines work and operate is limited. As Double G pointed out if it were that easy everyone would be doing it,
    And I'd be near the front of that line!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0
    By delaying the intake from closing you can shift the power band to higher rpms. At peak torque, every revolution produces the same amount of power no matter the rpm that peak torque is created at. So if your engines power band is 5k rpm higher the engine will produce 15-20% more power.
    Respectfully, I'm going to repeat, what you are doing with the crankshaft has nothing to do with delaying the intake port timing.... You just showed me you've never dealt with tuning on a dyno. I have. Your statement here is either missing information or not correct.
    The crankshaft is providing bottom end" lubrication to the conrod, wristpin, starter shaft and everything below the combustion chamber as well as fuel into the intake port. You can make it more efficient, increase or decrease fuel distribution, but it does NOT change the intake port timing.

    Ceramic coating the aluminum piston... Humm, Why? Need more compression change the head shim or go to a button head and a turbo plug.

    I can label any bottle to say 90 octane and create a stunning video saying I'm running on 2 stroke gas. IMHO, with modding engines, racing as a sponsored racer, my own personal experience with working with people like Maxy of Maxy fuels in Miami Florida who I raced and pitted with.

    I've ported sleeves, used epoxy inside the crank and cut the crank to increase fuel delivery and efficiency. Cutting the crank in a way that it sort of scoops the fuel and does less slinging of the fuel. Using fanging, creating more of a bullet shape at the bottom of the sleeve, knife edging the conrod so it will cut through the fuel existing in the bottom end which increases the speed of how quickly the engine can get up to top RPM with less stress on the conrod from the friction of the fuel in the lower end of the case.
    all points out to me you have better chances getting your TRX engine to run on old vegetable oil from a fast food restaurant

    I've pretty much stated enough at this point so this is my last post in this thread. Honestly I really wish you could prove me wrong.

    Just a couple more points.

    Pump gas burns at a higher temp than nitro methane. A much higher temp. So cooling would be a serious issue. The fins on the cooling head would need more cooling ability (larger fins, taler cooling head, something like that. Also you would get about 1/3 the fuel economy on pump gas as well.

    OK I'm done, good luck with it all. I'll love to see a post that proves what you have said you have been doing but so far it just does not hold water.
    Last edited by Nitronaught; 11-09-2019 at 11:40 AM.
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    Nitronought, look at rotary intakes on one of your many engines that are sitting around. If you grind down about 1mm of metal from the shown area it makes it so the port closes a few degrees later. When the port closes later at high rpms the mass of the air overcomes the blow back and boosts engine power. That is why high rpm rotary valve engines are blowby type engines and don't close the valve at TDC.
    If you have never modified the rotary intake valve I recommend looking into it. Look into-
    RB mods- refers to changing timing on the crankshaft
    2 stroke tuners hand book- read pg. 85-89 goes very in depth on Port timing and rotary valve timing.

    Nitronought mentioned gasoline burning hotter but didn't know why I am looking into ceramic coating the piston... Nitronought If you read through all my posts you would read that I want to use ceramic coating on the engine parts so that the heat stays in the combusting gasses and less heat goes into the engine. Same applies with the piston. I have heard stories of overheating piston getting holes melted through them and I don't want to risk having the same problem.

    Second you said that I would get 1/3 the fuel economy. Look at the NV gx40 and OS ggt15 they are both small, radio control, gasoline glow ignition engines. Both of those engine get about 3x the fuel economy of there equal nitro engine counterparts. Finally from my current tests I am getting better fuel economy with the engine on gasoline that I'm nitro. I'm not to worried about fuel economy.

    Also thanks for mentioning the vegetable oil. It reminded me about hot bulb engines that can run on almost anything with only a 5:1 compression... With a very hot glow plug and a high compression ratio just maybe I could run and engine on diesel fuel. I don't know what to expect but I will look into it.

  29. #69
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    Yup Davis Diesel used to be around and had conversion kits for the TRX 3.3 davisdieseldevelopment.com Not sure if they are around or not.

    Vegetable oil, I wasn't kidding and pretty sure it's doable. But Davis Diesel used to publish a lot about how the conversion is done you might be able to pick up some archives in the forums on that.
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    Hmmm. I saw that a few years ago. But I thought they ran on some ether based fuel not actual pump diesel. I found this paper a few years back.

    https://www.semanticscholar.org/pape...5e3957ea653aee

    In the paper they convert an OS 70 to run on jet fuel (jp-8) which is very comparable to pump diesel. They did run into many problems. First it took them between roughly 20 seconds and 250 seconds of cranking the engine over before the friction in the engine built up enough heat for the engine to have its first ignition even with the glow plug. Second to reduce starting times from the 200+ seconds they increased the compression but once warmed up the engine would have problems with detonation. They also had many other problems outlined in the paper.

    Based on the paper it sounds like a mini carbureted engine that runs on diesel would need both a glow plug and variable compression or an extremely high compression ratio that would blow up most nitro engines.

  31. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob2.0 View Post
    Based on the paper it sounds like a mini carbureted engine that runs on diesel would need both a glow plug and variable compression or an extremely high compression ratio that would blow up most nitro engines.
    If I remember the Davis Diesel had a way to vary it's compression and it was a bear to get right. However you are correct on the pump diesel, you had to use their own blend of diesel which had ethyl alcohol in it. If you check this forum and others you will find threads on what people have went through, some successes.

    I guess if the Davis Diesel conversion was more successful they would still be around.
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  32. #72
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    Yep. Not much of a cost savings when one found out that the $4/gallon diesel at the corner gas station would not work in it and had to buy Davis's special blend.
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    I just wish there would be a great way to save nitro.

    Model engine "diesel" fuel is near impossible to buy and expensive to make. My converted revo always overheats, doesn't run well when cold, it is nearly as messy as nitro, it weighs more than stock, and the fuel is still ~$10 per gallon with the 10% caster oil.

    I know I can still improve my revo by a lot. But even if my revo was perfect I don't know if that technology could save these engine powered models.

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    I think I found how to upload pics to the forum.

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    What first inspired me to try and convert my revo to gasoline with glow ignition was a company (nv) that put a gasoline engine with a glow plug into production and it had a near identical nitro counterpart that I could compare it to to know what I needed to modify and how. Here are both the gasoline and nitro engine specs so you can compare them.

    Gasoline -

    Specifications
    Displacement - 0.40 cu.in. 6.48 cc
    Bore - 0.82 in. 20.85 mm
    Stroke - 0.75 in. 19 mm.
    Compression ratio - 12.0-14.0
    Average performance - 2,600 - 14,000 RPM
    Direction of rotation - counterclockwise
    Voltage - 1.5V
    Fuel consumption - 20 oz/h
    Weight w/o muffler - 10.79 oz. 306 grams
    Recommended props - 10x7, 11x6,12.25x3.75*

    Uses an OS P3 plug and 93 octane gasoline with 14% caster oil. Does have a modified carburetor. (I have heard it's a little bit bigger)


    Nitro -

    Specifications
    Displacement - 0.40 cu.in. 6.48 cc
    Bore - 0.82 in. 20.85 mm
    Stroke - 0.75 in. 19 mm.
    Compression ratio - 9 - 12
    Average performance - 2,500 - 16,000 RPM
    Direction of rotation - counterclockwise
    Voltage - 1.5V
    Fuel consumption - 30 oz/h
    Weight w/o muffler - 10.9 oz. 309 grams
    Recommended props - 10x5 to 10x7, 11x4 to 11x6

    Uses a standard airplane glow plug and roughly 15% nitro fuel


    First thing you should note is the compression ratio. Both engines can vary in compression based on the number of shims. The average compression ratio for the nitro engine is 10.5:1 and the average for gasoline is 13:1. Next the nitro engines peak recommended rpm is 2k higher than the gasoline engines. On the flip side, the gasoline engine produces much more torque shown by the recommended propeller sizes. Finally the gasoline engine only has 2/3 the fuel consumption of the nitro engine.

    Most of my info for converting my revo came from the comparisons between these 2 engines. I'm running an lc3 glow plug because it has the same element as the P3 plug. I have increased the compression by quite a bit and I still need to raise it more. Finally I switched out carbs to get the proper fuel metering required.


    (This is the gasoline engine)

    Sent from my KFKAWI using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Bob2.0; 11-12-2019 at 08:40 PM.

  36. #76
    RC Competitor
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    (This is the nitro engine)

    Sent from my KFKAWI using Tapatalk

  37. #77
    RC Qualifier JatoTheRipper's Avatar
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    Sep 2007
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    Very cool project!

  38. #78
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    Oct 2019
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    anymore progress bob?

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