Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59

    what are the options that work to use aluminum slipper pads on 2 WD rustler with RPM

    It must work with the Traxxas RPM sensor.

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    It must work with the Traxxas RPM sensor.

    Are you just looking for better than the original slipper pads..?
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  3. #3
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59
    We are looking for something that will last longer. Would Hot Racing carbon fiber pads last longer than aluminum pads? When the stock slipper is new , the trucks will have a nice smooth coast after we let off the trigger. After they are used for some runs ( about 3 battery charges) they have a jerky coast after we let off the trigger. The stock slipper pads dont last very long.

  4. #4
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    We are looking for something that will last longer. Would Hot Racing carbon fiber pads last longer than aluminum pads?

    Good question..! Ok the fact is that the aluminum pads have tendency to absorb the heat generated by the friction of the sytem and as we know, aluminum tends to expand with the heat process, therefore it's impossible to have a consistent adjustement of the traction, because the friction is variable and incontrolable but to answer correctly your question, I have to say that generaly, aluminum do not last longer than the appropriate set of carbon pads, also they will engage more abruptly and every time the drivetrain has to take the hit... also at a corner exit, the motricity and stability are affected by the wild operation of the slipper clutch. Now you have two choices, first you can go for a carbon set and it's not a bad choice at all, because carbon and every composite materiels are what we call a dead matter, that will mean it will never be affected by the weather temperature, no more than the heat generated by the pads friction, I use mine like a traction control and when it's setup, it will give me a very consistent traction on a given surface, another thing here has to be taken into consideration is that it's possible to buy it in two configurations, there are the short and long pads option and it is the same price but does not have the same effect, to be simple, I need to say that the clutch engagement will be more gradual with the shorter pads and the long pads will bite like a mad dog but they will last almost forever, so they are good contenders for the week end basher, now the last technology available is the graphite pads, again to be short here, I will say there are also two options of lengh and the short one are more intended to be used with a low power system and the second option is more utilised with a mid power configuration but I only recommend to use those one for racing application.



    I want to welcome the newbie member to the awesome Traxxas Forum but I have to say that the Forum is just as awesome than the members are..
    Last edited by MECHANIC77; 10-14-2019 at 10:00 PM.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  5. #5
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,126
    The aluminum pads are best used by people who like their slipper clutch locked down tight most of the time. If you use the slipper clutch for any form of traction control use anything but aluminum pads.

  6. #6
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    4,280
    Iím a little concerned about the comment that states a jerky motion when coasting with worn pads. To me that doesnít make sense. If youíre coasting, youíre not under a load, and in my head the clutch is not really an active part of the system at that time. If thatís affecting coasting, something else may be up. I use CF long pads btw.


    Somehow builds are never done....

  7. #7
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59
    Could it be that my slipper nut was too tight?

  8. #8
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    4,280
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    Could it be that my slipper nut was too tight?
    I donít see how. I keep mine locked 99% of the time(itís a speed car). I donít have those issues


    Somehow builds are never done....

  9. #9
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,126
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    Could it be that my slipper nut was too tight?
    With a tight slipper clutch it doesn't affect anything because it just acts like its not there. The only problem you get from a tight slipper clutch is damage to other driveline parts like axles, spur gear, diffs, motor, and wheel hexes. The slipper clutch is a safety feature to allow for driveline slippage when damaging impulse force happens to the driveline. Like sudden wheel stops from landing jumps on throttle or a rock getting stuck somewhere in the driveline. Or if you have a powerful motor that has enough torque to damage the driveline.

    So the slipper clutch only comes into play during stopping or starting motion. During coasting it is an inert component. If it is too loose you will experience slow acceleration and soft brakes to none at all. You also may hear the slipper clutch squealing during both starting and stop.

    Coasting problems would cause me to check for broken gear teeth, worn bearings, or bent shafts.
    Last edited by zedorda; 10-15-2019 at 10:50 AM.

  10. #10
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    All of the above advices could be one of the causes of the problem but one of the major cause of an inconsistent clutch opperation is due to a waved rotor clutch disk, which is caused by a bad clutch breaking procedure and like the real brakes on a car, the clutch system must be properly breaking before normal operation can be reached, here we talk about a couple of thousandth of millimeters of disk wavering clearances but this can cause a roughed operation of the clutch system.



    To validate this theory, it just needed to lock the clutch nut and see what happen.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  11. #11
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59
    The problem has gone away when a slipper rebuild kit was installed every time. I just orderd the Hot Racing long and short carbon fiber pads along with some stock rebuild kits (for the discs).
    Last edited by Moreguns; 10-15-2019 at 04:13 PM.

  12. #12
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    The problem has gone away when a slipper rebuild kit was installed every time.

    Yeah but I can imagine that the problem has reappear faster than the time it take to rebuild the clutch, obviously I'm exaggerating and I could be wrong but if you have the same problem at every time, I strongly suggest to proceed to a clutch break-in before normal operation of the system, the clutch parts need to be heat and cold down in a controlled manner to ensure the durability of the system and before it become fully operational.



    If you need to know an appropriate break-in procedure, feel free to reply.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  13. #13
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by MECHANIC77 View Post
    If you need to know an appropriate break-in procedure, feel free to reply.
    Mechanic77, I'd like to learn about proper break-in!
    MTFBWY

  14. #14
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,126
    Quote Originally Posted by MECHANIC77 View Post
    If you need to know an appropriate break-in procedure, feel free to reply.
    I am also very curious about this clutch break-in procedure you speak of. Since I have never heard of it in the 40+ years doing RC. This should be interesting.

  15. #15
    Marshal ksb51rl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    20,527

    what are the options that work to use aluminum slipper pads on 2 WD rustler with RPM

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gkESYEkwsnk
    There are other ways. This method of initial adjustment is applicable to almost all models.
    Alt-248 on the number pad = į

  16. #16
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Synnergy View Post
    Mechanic77, I'd like to learn about proper break-in!


    Hi Synnergy..! I have learned so much from you, that it would be an honor for me to share some knowledge with you. First I want to say that the Traxxas clutch unit is very good and as far as I know, Traxxas was the first manufacturer to design and offer a system with asbestos pads but as good as the concept is, it needs to be proprely broken-in to offer optimal performance and durability. Ok to begin with, it might be interessting to know what a break-in consists of and what is the theory behind the practice. The concept of break-in could be explain as follows: at the exception of the dead matter which includes exclusively all composite materials, every other material has what is called a molecular memory and by conception it stipulates that when a material is submitted to a stress or / and a heat process, it will record the information temporarely at the atomic level but permanently at a molecular level and this will cause a change of state of the matter. What does all that means..? Ok the conception is simple in it's complexity and when the matter or materiel if you prefer is submitted to a heat process, the molecules will expend, but there is a point of temperature where they never return to their original position, this matter state is traduces as a material density loss. Therefore the matter becomes unstable and can deform, also the loss of density will increase the brittleness as well as the speed at which a part in this state who is submitted to friction will wear, but on the other hand, when we are able to control the heat and cool down process we need to break-in the system proprely. Then it's possible to increase the molecular density and stability of the material, consequently a materiel can support more stress and friction and the maximum temperature rate will increase as well as the durability of the part components.


    I know, so many explanations and no answer.. So only one question remains, how can we proprely break-in a clutch system..? drum roll please.. Ok seriousely the general idea here is to avoid to overheat the parts and ruin everything in the first run but because of the difference in power sytem and torque our power unit develops, it would be impossible for me to give precise informations like how to setup the clutch tightness etc... however the general idea is to induce some friction in a control manner and perform a temperature raise with a complete cool down but it is necessary to do it at least three times and we want to start with a low temperature raise, then we have to let everything cool down for an hour and this will also give the molecules time to become stable. At this point, we just have to remember to never overheat the components more than the maximum temperature at which they will be submitted during normal operation.



    It's as easy as 1 2 3 but usualy it should be done with simplicity without any complexity and everything will be in Synnergy...
    Last edited by MECHANIC77; 10-16-2019 at 08:49 PM.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  17. #17
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,126
    That explanation was golden. Thank you very much. I understood this process as calibrating the slipper clutch while also trying to avoid glazing the pads. Good to know the proper term for it now.

  18. #18
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by zedorda View Post
    That explanation was golden. Thank you very much. I understood this process as calibrating the slipper clutch while also trying to avoid glazing the pads. Good to know the proper term for it now.

    Although I have never think about the possibility of glazing something, I now understand that it's an important thing to avoid and it's one of the primary goals to achieve. However if someone have any doubt about how to proceed, I recommend to use the suggested Traxxas procedure, which will give good result as well as a perfect traction control of the vehicle but if someone want more durability with about the same performance, then it's just a different way who will give different results. Also someone could applied those knowledges and finish with a better result than I could expect for myself.



    Thanks for sharing your comments an appreciations and I wish you will have good results with the method of your choice.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  19. #19
    RC Qualifier Synnergy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    902
    Simplified version:
    Quote Originally Posted by MECHANIC77 View Post
    it needs to be proprely broken-in to offer optimal performance and durability-
    Avoid to overheat the parts and ruin everything in the first run. The general idea is to induce some friction in a controled manner and perform a temperature raise with a complete cool down (see video from ksb in previous post). Do it at least three times. We want to start with a low temperature raise and then we have to let everything cool down! Never overheat the components! It's as easy as 1 2 3 but usually it should be done with simplicity without any complexity and everything will be in Synnergy...
    The "glazing" of the slipper pads is the permanent deformation/transformation of the pad-material due to overheating. I think this is exactly what you were describing Mechanic, right? I paraphrased your response from earlier, I hope that is alright.
    MTFBWY

  20. #20
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Synnergy View Post
    Simplified version:


    The "glazing" of the slipper pads is the permanent deformation/transformation of the pad-material due to overheating. I think this is exactly what you were describing Mechanic, right? I paraphrased your response from earlier,alright I hope that is .

    When clutch components are heated to the point that the parts surface start to varnish, usually the clutch disk deformation starts before glazing can occur but no matter which break-in procedure is applied, even after the break-in, if the clutch is set to slip more than it needs, it's also possible to glaze those parts but break-in procedure avoids the risk of disk deformation.



    And to be fair with you, I have to admit that your description is somehow conform with my reality and I'm happy to learn that I am not the only one who understands what I said.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  21. #21
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59
    I will start with new disc and the hot racing carbon fiber long pads set at 1/2 turn out . Traxxas VXL 5.4 pound rustler without battery. 6.6 pounds with 2 cell li- po traxxas 10000 . Boca ceramic hybrid orange seal greased bearings installed in all spots ( motor,wheele wheels, ect.)except for the 5 th and 6 th spots in the hot racing bell cranks with the servo saver built in. What should my slipper be set at and why? Our Rustlers will be used for on and off road.

  22. #22
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    What should my slipper be set at and why? Our Rustlers will be used for on and off road.


    To be short and simple here, the clutch adjustement must be done with what the tires traction can achieve, so it's just necessary to loose the adjustement to the point where the front tires stop to leave the ground, also your drivetrain should be safe.



    When the clutch is rebuilt and by what you described, in your case, it would be a good idea to replace the part number 5556.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

  23. #23
    RC Competitor
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    59
    We have the steel traxxas driveshafts

  24. #24
    RC Qualifier MECHANIC77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    370
    Quote Originally Posted by Moreguns View Post
    We have the steel traxxas driveshafts

    The part number (5556) refers to the slipper pressure plate & hub assembly, when a clutch system reaches a temperature beyond the normal operating temperature, usualy the pressure plate suffers of mecanical deformation and needs to be replace. Sometimes the pressure plate & hub assembly can be deform if we over tighten the three screws who hold the assembly together. Also on a site like E-bay / Amazon etc... when we are looking for a part and we have only the part number, we just need to enter Traxxas and the part number beside it (Traxxas 5556) and we will find exactly and rapidly what we are looking for.



    To avoid the deformation and hold tightly the pressure plate & hub assembly, it's a common practice to use some blue Loctite to prevent to overtight them.
    Last edited by MECHANIC77; 11-02-2019 at 08:01 PM.
    Good driver. Bad setup. Bad things will happen...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •