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  1. #1
    RC Competitor
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    Oct 2019
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    How to break in new brushed motor?

    Hey guys, i just bought a new brushed motor, how do i break it in?

  2. #2
    RC Racer
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    Jan 2012
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    Trenton, ON, Canada
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    apply 3 volts and run for 15-30 minutes. You can do the break in submersed in a tub of water but don't leave it in too long as the brushes will wear fast.

  3. #3
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
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    Yeah when done in water it is alot faster and should only be done for about 2-3 mins at low speed. And re-oil the bushings.

  4. #4
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    N. Idaho... Da Sticks!
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    Just drive it around at about 1/3 throttle for about 10 minutes. Remove the motor, clean it, lubricate it, reinstall then run it like you rented it...
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  5. #5
    RC Qualifier
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    Dec 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by stampedejim View Post
    apply 3 volts and run for 15-30 minutes. You can do the break in submersed in a tub of water but don't leave it in too long as the brushes will wear fast.
    "Back in the old NiCd days" ( I just wanted to say that phrase and sound wise ) my dad used to set up a little mechanical speed controller resistor on a block of scrap wood and wire that into an extra battery pack. Also used to partially submerge them in baby food jars with some solvent that was a "safer" alternative to carbon tetrachoride. Eventually he switched to distilled water and then oil all the bearings really well. I think he went back to just driving them for a battery or so at like 1/3-1/2 throttle .
    He liked to experiment. I can't say that pre teen me noticed an different between the methods

  6. #6
    RC Racer
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    Apr 2019
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    115
    This takes me back. So much motor voodoo! I used to run mine in using a glass of water, with motor submerged and running at 3v off a couple of batteries. In about 30-60 seconds the water would start getting darker and there’d be glittery bits of brush floating around. Take it out, oil it, run it full blast until you figure the water’s evaporated, oil again... I learned a bunch of tricks on advancing the timing in a sealed, brushed motor, but it escapes me right now.

    I really love brushless motors.

  7. #7
    RC Qualifier
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    Dec 2016
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    N Dakota USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeyracing View Post
    This takes me back. So much motor voodoo! I used to run mine in using a glass of water, with motor submerged and running at 3v off a couple of batteries. In about 30-60 seconds the water would start getting darker and there’d be glittery bits of brush floating around. Take it out, oil it, run it full blast until you figure the water’s evaporated, oil again... I learned a bunch of tricks on advancing the timing in a sealed, brushed motor, but it escapes me right now.

    I really love brushless motors.
    I don’t remember any of the tricks for advancing timing on a sealed end bell. Then again the clubs in races in were real lax with “Stock “ motor rules anyway . ( plus I was a young pre-teen/ teen when inrwced an deven though I didn’t some wrenching , my dad was the wizard )

  8. #8
    RC Champion zedorda's Avatar
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    If you understand what the "break-in" process is trying to accomplish then you can see there are several ways to do it. The whole point of the "break-in" process is to develop a curved mating surface between the brushes(flat square) and the stator(round). This allows for the correct amount of amperage to be conducted through them. It is best done with a flat electrical input power level. Why? You may ask. Because it isn't broken-in yet really. Before it is broken-in the brushes have only a tiny contact point on the round stator reducing the amount of amperage it can conduct. So if you break it in through use in the vehicle(or with any load on it at all)even at low speed will cause electrical arcs between the brushes surface without contact with the stator. These arcs will cause hard spots in the brushes and pitting in the stator.

    This can greatly reduce the overall lifespan of the brushed motor(since the mating surfaces are rough)but most people find that the low cost of brushed motors negates the need to break-in properly and that is up to each person to figure out what they want. I just offer this information in case anyone cares about it.

    Now there are several manufactures of brushes supplying brushes with precut curved surfaces to rebuild brushed motors with and some higher end brushed motors come with these advanced brushes which don't need a proper break-in and just driving the RC at low speed for a while does just fine.
    Last edited by zedorda; 11-02-2019 at 12:09 PM.

  9. #9
    RC Enthusiast
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    Oct 2017
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    49
    +1 for the 1/4 to 1/3 throttle, no load (not in grass/level ground) for 10 to 15 minutes. Let cool, spray a good electrical motor cleaner to wash out the brush dust, air dry and lube the bushings. 2 years strong on original Titan T550’s using NiMH and 2S Lipo’s. Cleaning and lubing every 5 to 6 packs.

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