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  1. #1
    RC poster
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    Oct 2019
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    6

    Advice on stiffer springs for E-Revo 2.0

    Hi,

    I would like to change the springs for my E-Revo 2.0 to stiffer ones. I now have the stock ones (3.8 in the front and 4.1 in the rear), and I am using the stock oil. I mostly bash off road and I do jumps as well. I want the ride height to be higher and I would like the suspension to easily rebound back high up after pushing the car down.

    Should I change to the summit springs (maybe double red or yellow)? Will this help the car from smashing down after jumps and will it help increase the ride height/suspension travel as they are longer? And I keep reading about std. front or rear 120mm, what is the difference between that and the normal stock ones?

    Has anyone had experience with stiffer springs? Can anyone please give me some advice? Sorry for all the questions...

    Thanks a lot.
    Last edited by WesselR; 10-27-2019 at 01:22 PM.

  2. #2
    RC Enthusiast
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Canada
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    23
    Hi,

    This is going to depend on how and where you drive.

    Some personal background: I've owned an E-Revo 2 for about a year and a half. It was my first hobby-grade RC I bought and I am happy with it. I mainly use it off-road, bike parks, skate parks, etc. For jumping I don't really ever go more than 6-8 feet vertical.

    Out of the box, the E-Revo 2 has a plush suspension set-up which is great for speed over bumps and whoops. However, I like the look and performance of higher clearance and the jumping capabilities.

    There are a few ways to address what you're trying to achieve.

    1) Ride Height: Change the position of the push rods, front and rear. There are three settings (holes) on the lower A-arm that they can be screwed into. Closer to centre-line means higher ride height, closer to wheel means lower ride-height.

    2) Springs: A lot of people seem to like Silver 4.9 rate springs up front and Blue 5.9 rate springs in the rear. This is what I've been running most of the time. I am going to try one level stiffer springs next season.

    3) Pre-load: The shock bodies have a threaded collar that can be turned to compress or decompress the springs. More compressed means stiffer set-up. Be sure not to over compress the pre-load adjustment because you want to the springs to have enough length when the shocks are fully compressed in order to allow maximum suspension travel.

    4) Shock Oil: The shock oil weight can be changed. I am currently using 60wt silicone shock oil and am happy with that. I think stock shock oil is 40wt or 50wt.

    5) Pistons/Variable Dampening Kit: Shock pistons can be changed to suit your needs in order to vary the amoung of damping. Larger or smaller holes on the pistons will increase or decrease dampening. Additionally, you can get the VDK (Traxxas part # 5461) to further modify shock response.

    Regarding "standard" versus "120mm" springs, I think all the Traxxas GTR springs for the E-Revo 2 are 120mm/standard and it is just an inconsistency on their parts webpage.

    Lastly, chassis slap. This annoyed me at first and still does sometimes but I don't think there is any way to stop the body from hitting the ground completely if you like to jump. With the proper suspension set-up and a good landing, it should be minimal for small to moderate jumps. On big jumps, it's going to happen.

    Good luck and have fun!

  3. #3
    RC poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by RCzRfun View Post
    Hi,

    This is going to depend on how and where you drive.

    Some personal background: I've owned an E-Revo 2 for about a year and a half. It was my first hobby-grade RC I bought and I am happy with it. I mainly use it off-road, bike parks, skate parks, etc. For jumping I don't really ever go more than 6-8 feet vertical.

    Out of the box, the E-Revo 2 has a plush suspension set-up which is great for speed over bumps and whoops. However, I like the look and performance of higher clearance and the jumping capabilities.

    There are a few ways to address what you're trying to achieve.

    1) Ride Height: Change the position of the push rods, front and rear. There are three settings (holes) on the lower A-arm that they can be screwed into. Closer to centre-line means higher ride height, closer to wheel means lower ride-height.

    2) Springs: A lot of people seem to like Silver 4.9 rate springs up front and Blue 5.9 rate springs in the rear. This is what I've been running most of the time. I am going to try one level stiffer springs next season.

    3) Pre-load: The shock bodies have a threaded collar that can be turned to compress or decompress the springs. More compressed means stiffer set-up. Be sure not to over compress the pre-load adjustment because you want to the springs to have enough length when the shocks are fully compressed in order to allow maximum suspension travel.

    4) Shock Oil: The shock oil weight can be changed. I am currently using 60wt silicone shock oil and am happy with that. I think stock shock oil is 40wt or 50wt.

    5) Pistons/Variable Dampening Kit: Shock pistons can be changed to suit your needs in order to vary the amoung of damping. Larger or smaller holes on the pistons will increase or decrease dampening. Additionally, you can get the VDK (Traxxas part # 5461) to further modify shock response.

    Regarding "standard" versus "120mm" springs, I think all the Traxxas GTR springs for the E-Revo 2 are 120mm/standard and it is just an inconsistency on their parts webpage.

    Lastly, chassis slap. This annoyed me at first and still does sometimes but I don't think there is any way to stop the body from hitting the ground completely if you like to jump. With the proper suspension set-up and a good landing, it should be minimal for small to moderate jumps. On big jumps, it's going to happen.

    Good luck and have fun!
    Thanks a lot for the detailed reply! I really appreciate that.

    I run in similar terrain as you, and I will try the summit double orange in the back and double yellow in the front.

    Thanks for all the tips, I will try them out!

  4. #4
    RC Champion olds97_lss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dekalb, IL
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    2,425
    Whatever you end up with, make sure the chassis bottoms out before the shocks do. If you use too long of a spring or tighten down the shock collars too far, you will end up snapping shock ends off on jumps or at the very least bending pushrods, breaking rockers or rod ends.

    I used to run heavy springs in my ERBEv1 (blue/purple), but I went through rod ends and shock ends so fast that I got tired of replacing them all the time. I changed to VG dual rate springs which seem to be a happy medium.

    I've since bought a 2.0 roller and move my stuff over to it.

    My current setup:
    2.0 push rods/ends
    70w AE oil with VDK #3 front
    60w AE oil with VDK #2 rear
    RCRaven Springs
    Pushrods in furthest out holes in the arms (lowest setting)
    Shock limiting straps on the rear
    Trencher 3.8's wrapped with kevlar string

    You can see how/where I bash in my latest video:
    https://forums.traxxas.com/showthrea...=1#post6514009

    I don't baby it at all and it has been holding up really well. I broke the t-bone front skid plate during that and somewhere hit something that bent my front pushrods pretty good. I replaced them with a spare set of v1 pushrods and used the 2.0 ends. Appears they are the same length, but the 2.0's aren't threaded all the way like the v1's were. I have 2.0's coming in the mail, but figured I'd try these in the meantime.
    Last edited by olds97_lss; 10-30-2019 at 12:44 PM.
    Expert rigging at it's best!

  5. #5
    RC poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Posts
    2
    I changed to 45 weight oil along with the silver springs in the rear and green on the front. This has helped a little with stopping the truck bottoming out, but I'm still not happy. The suspension does not rebound like other monster trucks I have seen / driven / owned. Once compressed, the car just sits there and does not come up again. I also found it to be slightly bouncy on the really rough stuff at speed, a lot better than when I had 60 weight in though.

  6. #6
    RC Champion olds97_lss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dekalb, IL
    Posts
    2,425
    Pretty sure it's designed to bottom out. If you set it up so stiff that it doesn't bottom out, you end up snapping shock shafts or at the very least burning through shock ends/pushrod ends at an alarming rate.

    I run too stiff of setup on my nitro revo's, but I don't drive them much anymore. Been too long since I messed with the shocks on them to remember what oil/vdk piston is in them, but pretty sure I run silver/blue on my 21TM revo and blue/purple on my BB revo. I haven't run the BB one in a year or so. The VDK helps with it being bouncy as it allows you to put oil in that slows compression, but the shocks are allowed to rebound quickly/more easily. However, going too thick of oil and you end up just snapping the pistons in half.

    I spent more time adjusting my ERBEv1 (now v2) as I drive it far more than my nitro's and I gave in to the fact that it will bottom out and that's ok.

    If I revisit my nitro's, I may go with the same setup I run on the ERBEv2, although, I think they are a bit lighter. I know my 21TM revo is lighter... well, feels lighter in my hand.
    Expert rigging at it's best!

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