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  1. #1
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    Crawler Motor that requires soldering

    I'm thinking of installing a brushless Tekin ROC412 HD motor and a Tekin RX4 ESC on my TRX6, which requires quite a bit of soldering. Also, I want to attach a Traxxas power connector (for the battery to the ESC) on the RX4. Is it possible to cut the wire from one of my old Traxxas ESCs and solder it on to the ESC? Is it worth it to go through all that work, or should I go with a simpler plugin motor and ESC?

    Thanks!
    Jumping: maneuver and pray it won't break.

  2. #2
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. jamann's Avatar
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    I run xt 60 connecters on everything except my traxxas lipos.
    So I use a homemade adapter plug to run those packs
    A older style traxxas plug and a xt 60 joined with as short of wires as i could use.also made the opposite connecter as well so I can charge them all on the traxxas charger.

    Sent from my SM-G973W using Tapatalk
    Mountains cant stop me
    they have tried

  3. #3
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    I kind of look at soldering as a transparent thing, its just part of the hobby, and necessary when needed. Of course having had training and have solder professionally for over 25 years doesn't hurt either...

    With that, if the more you want requires soldering, you have two choices, compromise with equipment that isn't quite what you want, or solder it up. If you are new to soldering, recommend watching a good number of videos on the subject, then practice with scrap material until you feel comfortable. Soldering is like math, it isn't learned, its practiced.

    You'll want a reasonably powered iron, soldering 12 and 14ga wire will require at least a 60W iron, but 80w would be a lot better. Remember, heat is not your friend, the less time the iron is in contact with your work the better.

    You can cut off the Traxxas connector and solder it on, but if you are going to go down that road, recommend finding good low loss connectors and install those, then convert everything you have over to them (like Deans or XT60).
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  4. #4
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    Most of my batteries are Traxxas batteries, I have a pretty good experience with soldering, but what do you mean by low loss connector?
    Jumping: maneuver and pray it won't break.

  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TITANIUM94010 View Post
    Most of my batteries are Traxxas batteries, I have a pretty good experience with soldering, but what do you mean by low loss connector?
    Any connector like the Traxxas connector, Deans, XT-series connectors. When soldered properly, they have very low impedance, so more of the power gets to the electronics. For instance, Molex connectors (AKA: Tamiya plugs), have a relatively high impedance, using them on a system that draws a lot of current will cause the connectors themselves to heat up (and often times melt), but that heat is energy that could have gone to powering your RC.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  6. #6
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    I prefer to solder

    I learned by watching YouTube videos and its very easy

    I can put whatever connector I want on any RC

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greatscott View Post
    Any connector like the Traxxas connector, Deans, XT-series connectors. When soldered properly, they have very low impedance, so more of the power gets to the electronics. For instance, Molex connectors (AKA: Tamiya plugs), have a relatively high impedance, using them on a system that draws a lot of current will cause the connectors themselves to heat up (and often times melt), but that heat is energy that could have gone to powering your RC.
    Stay away from Dean's.. the spring steel in the connector gives up over time.. I've had 2 helicopter crashes due to Dean's failure.. you'll never see Dean's on an aircraft in any of the fields near me.. go with either xt60 or ic/ec5 connectors.

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  8. #8
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PapaGuido View Post
    Stay away from Dean's.. the spring steel in the connector gives up over time.. I've had 2 helicopter crashes due to Dean's failure.. you'll never see Dean's on an aircraft in any of the fields near me.. go with either xt60 or ic/ec5 connectors.

    Sent from my SM-N950W using Tapatalk
    I'll disagree here, if you buy Genuine Deans and not knock-offs, you will not have a problem. And, I know enough a good number of pilots that will not use anything else.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

  9. #9
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    I'm fairly new to soldering with this hobby, but I've really learned to enjoy it. There are 2 things that I've learned that make it way easier:
    1) tin the 2 points that you want to connect first
    2) keep extra flux on hand
    Whenever I'm having a little trouble soldering a joint I add a drop of flux and that always cleans it up. Be sure to get flux for electronics. I read that plumbers flux will corrode the wires over time.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Greatscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Carpenter View Post
    I'm fairly new to soldering with this hobby, but I've really learned to enjoy it. There are 2 things that I've learned that make it way easier:
    1) tin the 2 points that you want to connect first
    2) keep extra flux on hand
    Whenever I'm having a little trouble soldering a joint I add a drop of flux and that always cleans it up. Be sure to get flux for electronics. I read that plumbers flux will corrode the wires over time.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
    That is pretty much it. Standard soldering flux is what you want. But, the flux itself will corrode, and should be removed after everything is cooled down. Before I put heat shrink on I clean everything up with isopropyl alcohol, my solder joints normally shine up to a mirror finish. If they are dull and/or pitted it means I have a cold solder joint which will increase resistance and will be more likely to fail, in which case I redo the joint.
    Submarine Qualified, Chief Inducted, Navy Retired

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