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  1. #1
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Recommended battery connectors

    Hey fellas. I ran my Erevo the other day on 4s for about 20 mins, doing some light bashing in a gravel area near my house. I go inside to cool off, it was a bit humid out and I couldnít get one of the batteries to pull apart from the esc.

    Well on the batteries I run in the erevo they all have deans connectors, havenít had a problem with them until now. On one of my 3s, and 2s, the connectors got so hot the tabs inside the connectors melted the plastic. So I need connectors better suited for the power draw of the erevo.

    What do you all recommend? Iím thinking maybe xt90 connectors would be a good plug choice, but wanted some of your expertise.


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  2. #2
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    I have xt90s ( antispark ) on mine. No issues. On generic trx Gen1 I would melt the connectors as well.



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  3. #3
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Is there a specific brand that makes the xt90s that I should be looking for? I found a 10 pair xt90 pack made by Amass on amazon.


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  4. #4
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    Amass is who makes them. Other places are then knock offs.

    Do look for antispark ones as it helps protect the contacts.


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  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. olds97_lss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acidic01 View Post
    Amass is who makes them. Other places are then knock offs.

    Do look for antispark ones as it helps protect the contacts.


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    I use the same pairs together in all my trucks. The XT90S (anti-spark) are a bit more expensive, so I typically just put one on one of the two packs in every pair. Then I plug that XT90S pack in second. Seems to work well.

    I got tired of the gen 1 traxxas plugs coming unplugged constantly and soldering them was a bit of a pain.

    They still came apart on occasion since I can't strap the plugs down due to the pack lead length, so I made little clips to lock them together:


    One of those things where having a 3d printer would probably come in handy. I just use a scrap peice of flat delrin and a dremel. Suppose I could ziptie them every time... seemed wasteful.
    https://www.youtube.com/c/olds97lss

  6. #6
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Thanks fellas. Iíve ordered some xt90 connectors off amazon.

    Now I need to get a better soldering iron, the one I have is a cheapo and wonít keep temperature, makes it near impossible to solder anything.

    What brand should I look for, if you donít mind helping me once again


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  7. #7
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketzx1 View Post
    Thanks fellas. Iíve ordered some xt90 connectors off amazon.

    Now I need to get a better soldering iron, the one I have is a cheapo and wonít keep temperature, makes it near impossible to solder anything.

    What brand should I look for, if you donít mind helping me once again


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    I recently picked up this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077JDGY1J..._3OQ9EbWN8TMST

    It made short work of putting the 10awg wire back onto my battery. And making some new leads for my charger. (12awg) from the 1 short session I did with it I really like it so far.

    A 60watt iron with a flat tip should do it.

    I a have few older 40w irons and a Milwaukee 12v cordless iron 900į max ( is a issue with plastic holding the heating element in place as on long solder sessions it melts and element floops around) they all struggled with fine stranded 10awg wire.

    the Weller 70w is nice as I do a fair share of soldering so was worth while to get a decent one. I got it from hdx.

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  8. #8
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    Usually every time I mention that I use the Amass XT150 I hear something negative. I use them for a few reasons. First they are A LOT easier to plug and unplug. I hate jerking wires just to unplug, makes me worry about pulling something somewhere loose. Second is you don’t have to use a “Y” connector so there’s a few less connections and (yes minuscule resistance). Third reason is I can repair just the positive or negative connection if there’s ever an issue.

    Here’s the negative that I know about these XT150 connections. If these get into the hands of unsupervised kids they have the likelihood of simply plugging the positive battery lead into the negative battery connector. (I’d hate to see that so if your not 100% certain then choose something safer). The second somewhat drawback is soldering these can be tougher. I just made 8 of these connections today on some new batteries. A small butane torch made all the difference.

    Anyway that’s my point of view.

  9. #9
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. olds97_lss's Avatar
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    I started with an old 25W radio shack iron... had it for 20 years. When I started running electric 3 years ago, I found that 25W was pretty useless for anything much over 16AWG wire and ends.

    I got a cheap adjustable 60W iron and it did alright with 12AWG, but struggled with 10AWG unless I cranked it as high as it would go and gave it some recovery time between ends.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XZ31W3M

    Even then though, it wouldn't touch the solder blobs on a set of lipo's if I was to replace a broken off wire on them, which I've needed to do more than once. Guessing they use a high silver solder which takes more heat, and the amount of it they use is quite a lot to get up to temp quickly without damaging the cells.

    So I got a 100W iron that's like wielding a baseball bat:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XK5RXKC

    It wasn't adjustable, which meant I was dealing with a really hot iron with a lot of heat storage capacity... caused a new set of problems trying to solder ends without torching them in 5 seconds. Then I got a rheostat to plug it into:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0727VNGPK

    That works great at about 70% for 12AWG-10AWG stuff and 85% for fixing lipo packs. Although, the iron is way to bulky for delicate stuff like replacing a transistor on a board or soldering a servo wire back together, so I use both irons now for appropriate jobs. Still, not a bad setup having both for $75 really.
    https://www.youtube.com/c/olds97lss

  10. #10
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olds97_lss View Post
    I started with an old 25W radio shack iron... had it for 20 years. When I started running electric 3 years ago, I found that 25W was pretty useless for anything much over 16AWG wire and ends.

    I got a cheap adjustable 60W iron and it did alright with 12AWG, but struggled with 10AWG unless I cranked it as high as it would go and gave it some recovery time between ends.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XZ31W3M

    Even then though, it wouldn't touch the solder blobs on a set of lipo's if I was to replace a broken off wire on them, which I've needed to do more than once. Guessing they use a high silver solder which takes more heat, and the amount of it they use is quite a lot to get up to temp quickly without damaging the cells.

    So I got a 100W iron that's like wielding a baseball bat:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XK5RXKC

    It wasn't adjustable, which meant I was dealing with a really hot iron with a lot of heat storage capacity... caused a new set of problems trying to solder ends without torching them in 5 seconds. Then I got a rheostat to plug it into:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0727VNGPK

    That works great at about 70% for 12AWG-10AWG stuff and 85% for fixing lipo packs. Although, the iron is way to bulky for delicate stuff like replacing a transistor on a board or soldering a servo wire back together, so I use both irons now for appropriate jobs. Still, not a bad setup having both for $75 really.
    Have you gotten aluminum solder flux? The tabs to solder onto the batteries are aluminum. Regular electrical solder and flux doesn't work due to the chemistry. Unless your lucky to still have some solder flux on battery tab from factory.

    Trying to tin my tab failed so I started looking it up and found out needed special flux.

    It pretty corrosive on your tips so need to clean up well afterwards.

    I picked up this kit. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010UMSB9Y

    Made it suoer easy with a good iron. And soldered on in seconds and enough to last me forever on fixing batteries.





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  11. #11
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. olds97_lss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acidic01 View Post
    Have you gotten aluminum solder flux? The tabs to solder onto the batteries are aluminum. Regular electrical solder and flux doesn't work due to the chemistry. Unless your lucky to still have some solder flux on battery tab from factory.

    Trying to tin my tab failed so I started looking it up and found out needed special flux.

    It pretty corrosive on your tips so need to clean up well afterwards.

    I picked up this kit. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010UMSB9Y

    Made it suoer easy with a good iron. And soldered on in seconds and enough to last me forever on fixing batteries.





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    I ran across mention of that somewhere, but never tried that solder/flux. I just knew it was hard to get the solder to stick, but it did after I cleaned the tab off well with DA and hit it with a wire wheel on my dremel. Then I put some regular flux paste on it, tinned it with solder, held the tabs together and heated, then once cooled they were solidly connected.
    https://www.youtube.com/c/olds97lss

  12. #12
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    Look at the wall lenk brand. I've been using one for years. And the tool trucks rebrand them as well if you like paying extra for the name lol.

  13. #13
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    All great advice. Thanks for sharing this info Acidic and Olds! Iím okay at soldering, but I feel like with a better soldering iron I could do better. So I need to find some special solder with silver in it for soldering on the xt90 connectors?


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  14. #14
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketzx1 View Post
    All great advice. Thanks for sharing this info Acidic and Olds! Iím okay at soldering, but I feel like with a better soldering iron I could do better. So I need to find some special solder with silver in it for soldering on the xt90 connectors?


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    Like getting any pro quality tool over a cheapy. A good one will last ya.

    The aluminum flux is only needed if fixing your batteries when wires pulled off the aluminum tabs inside the battery.

    Regular electrical solder( different from plumbers solder) is what you want for your swapping out to xt90s connectors.


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  15. #15
    RC Champion grizzly03's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ;6544128
    ...So I need to find some special solder with silver in it for soldering on the xt90 connectors?
    I have used 96%Tin 4%Silver on motor wires and bullet connectors. I was using a Weller 80watt iron and it was a pain. Having that Silver in it made it require more heat than that 80watt iron could keep up with.

  16. #16
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Thanks for the heads up grizzly.


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  17. #17
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    I use a Hakko FX888D and it's been amazing with how fast it heats up, I can solder 8 awg, to servo wire that's 22 avg with no problems.

  18. #18
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input and advice. You fellas always have good info like this


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  19. #19
    RC Qualifier Rocketzx1's Avatar
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    Update for you guys.

    I ended up buying a Weller soldering station, the 40watt off Amazon. Wow. Works like a dream. I was able to tin the wires very easily, iron heated up quickly and maintained heat, unlike the el cheapo iron I was trying to use.

    I was able to put on xt90 connectors on all 4 lipos with ease, 2x 3s and 2x 2s, and just finished the esc. And as an added bonus, my goofy butt managed to burn myself twice with the Weller soldering iron

    Hereís the esc and lipos



    And for added bonus, the burn on my thumb




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