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  1. #1
    RC poster
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    1

    my new addiction..

    Welp, it didn't take long. A buddy of mine was given a VXL and we took it for a spin. The next day I pulled the trigger on a Slash 4x4 (brushed) and am hooked. The VXL was a bit much for me and not knowing how into it I would get, I went with the slower brushed model over the brushless.

    I have had it for about a week now and have already started modifying it and ordering some parts that haven't even arrived yet. I don't regret the brushed purchase, but I want more and I want to put a truck together this time. I am trying to decide on a kit to buy, but keep coming back to the trucks and if I am going to go with a truck, I might as well keep it similar to what I have for the sake of part transfer and backup.

    Should I consider something else?

    If I do a Slash, should I go with 2WD or another, faster 4WD? I would really like to do a LCG but want to do an entire kit to learn and get comfortable before considering a full ground up build. Also looking at the Losi TEN SCTE 3.0 if I branch out, which I am very open to. Really, I am just flooded with new information and learning and need a bit of guidance.

    Advice and direction?

    I am in Southern Oregon and would love to meet some other folks to drive about with sometime.

    Thanks,
    Jacob
    Last edited by sofieldmowing; 10-22-2020 at 11:15 AM.

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    NL
    Posts
    263
    There aren’t many kits anymore sadly, as RTR’s are way more popular. You could take your truck apart, and just rebuild it, but it won’t be as fun, I think.

    Moving to Oregon to

  3. #3
    RC Qualifier
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    Dallas TX
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by sofieldmowing View Post
    Welp, it didn't take long. A buddy of mine was given a VXL and we took it for a spin. The next day I pulled the trigger on a Slash 4x4 (brushed) and am hooked. The VXL was a bit much for me and not knowing how into it I would get, I went with the slower brushed model over the brushless.

    I have had it for about a week now and have already started modifying it and ordering some parts that haven't even arrived yet. I don't regret the brushed purchase, but I want more and I want to put a truck together this time. I am trying to decide on a kit to buy, but keep coming back to the trucks and if I am going to go with a truck, I might as well keep it similar to what I have for the sake of part transfer and backup.

    Should I consider something else?

    If I do a Slash, should I go with 2WD or another, faster 4WD? I would really like to do a LCG but want to do an entire kit to learn and get comfortable before considering a full ground up build.

    Advice and direction?

    I am in Southern Oregon and would love to meet some other folks to drive about with sometime.

    Thanks,
    Jacob
    Do you have many places to crawl? You could always go for the Trx-4 sport kit if so. Another option is the Stampede 4x4 kit, since a lot of parts from the Stampede are compatible with the Slash.
    The present is theirs; the future, is mine.

  4. #4
    RC Qualifier RCWilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    California Bay Area
    Posts
    808
    It really depends on your driving style and interests for your next car. What do you enjoy about your Slash 4x4? Is it the speed of it, how it drives, or something else? Once you've identified these, you will have a better idea of what car to get.

    Here are the main categories of the types of cars (see which one is the most appealing to you):

    Short course trucks (cars that are similar to the Slash):
    Short course trucks have a closed fender type of body (meaning the body covers the wheels) and loosely resemble full-scale short course trucks. Many people enjoy racing them and also just driving them around. They usually have independent suspension and come in RWD or 4WD (some scale trophy trucks have independent suspension in the front and a solid axle in the rear).

    Stadium Trucks (cars that are similar to the Rustler):
    Stadium Trucks have an open fender type of body (wheels stick out from the body), and look somewhat like monster trucks. They have a relatively low stance, making them good platforms for racing (if you want to race, probably go with TLR, since Traxxas cars are not that specialized in racing). They usually have independent suspension and come in RWD and 4WD.

    Monster Trucks (cars similar to the Stampede):
    Very similar looking to stadium trucks, but have a taller stance, more ground clearance, and larger tires. People mainly enjoy just driving them around, popping wheelies, and doing jumps. Some have independent suspension, while others have solid axles (Traxxas monster trucks all have independent).

    Crawlers and Scale Vehicles (TRX-4):
    This is probably the most interesting and most different category (imo). Unlike other cars, they are built to go slow and are geared down low for more torque, in order to go over obstacles. They have very scale or realistic-looking bodies. Instead of racing, they have scale competitions (which bodies look the best or most realistic and such), and crawling competitions (where they go over an obstacle course and go through all the gates fast, composed, and with the least amount of reversing, and errors like flipping over or getting hung up). Almost all of them are 4x4s.

    On-road cars (4 Tec 2.0 / X01):
    Have the least amount of suspension travel out of all categories, but are very agile and darty. There are two main types of on-road cars: touring cars and drift cars. Touring cars are mainly for racing and general driving. Drift cars are... well, for drifting (). They are somewhat like crawlers. They are also known for looking very scale and realistic (and yes, there are competitions for that). What they are most known for is their ability to drift (or powerslide for 4wd). They have a crazy amount of steering angle (nearly vertical) that helps them stabilize during drifting and hard wheels for the least amount of traction. There are drifting competitions where they go through a stretch of curvy roads, and slide around the corners composed and controlled. Drift cars are mainly RWD and some are 4WD. Touring cars are mainly 4WD, some FWD, some RWD.

    In terms of kits, ElectricPropils brought up some very good points. I would like to add on that Traxxas also has the "top trim" TRX-4 kit (has 2 speed transmission, front and rear locking diffs in addition to the Sport).

    Also, there are plenty of other brands you can look into. TLR (Losi) makes some good stadium truck and short course truck kits, as well as Tekno (they are more race-specific). Axial also make crawler kits, but I would stick with Traxxas for this one, since their new SCX10 3 isn't really well designed. For touring cars, Tamiya makes some good realistic looking kits, and Yokomo has some great drift cars. Hopefully this will give you a good idea of where to go.
    Everyday's a gift, thus now is called the present.

  5. #5
    RC Racer Skyline's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    182
    I just built up a 2wd slash kit and it was quite fun but rather quick and easy due to the simple nature of the truck. If you are looking for a more involved process then check out some race kits. I prefer Tekno as they are already an upgrade company and I have had their sct and buggy both of which are great pieces of kit. The sct can take a beating so don't shy away from it being a "race" kit. If you want to stick with Traxxas then I would say pick your favorite model and rebuild the whole thing. Part of the fun is working on the truck as much as driving it!
    its not fun until something breaks

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