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  1. #1
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    Why is the self righting bad?

    I know people say that using self righting is bad and to avoid it, but can anyone explain why?

    I mean, it's not much difference from flooring the car in mid-air to do a backdrop, surely? And I'd have thought that it would do less damage to the drivetrain than landing a jump?

    Would love to know the reason why it's bad, just to get my head around it. Also, does that mean wheelies are bad for the front diff?

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  2. #2
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    Try it and see what you think. It’s hard on the drivetrain.

  3. #3
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    Well i mean its putting near full throttle (if not full) and snaps back to full reverse over and over until it flips on its tires. Lots of shock on the drivetrain.

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  4. #4
    RC Champion Acidic01's Avatar
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    With ballooning tires and full speed start, stop, reverse. Is hard on the diffs. Ballooning tires break of the rims. Diffs loose teeth. I blew a diff with my eRevo 3rd time using it.


    Can use self righting but expect to pay 20 to 100+$ once something breaks when using it. To me I'll do a walk of shame vs ending my bash session and costing me time and money to fix....

    Wheelie can blow out your tires over time. If not belted or wrapped and not checking tires and regluing as needed.




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  5. #5
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. ReglarGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calebs0615 View Post
    Well I mean its putting near full throttle (if not full), and snaps back to full reverse over and over until it flips on its tires. Lots of shock on the drivetrain.
    This is very true, due to the repeated overcoming of the forces of inertia during the "Self Righting" process, but the size and weight of the Xmaxx is another factor to be considered too.

    Remember, inertia is the “sum of the product of mass” of each particle with the “square of its distance from the axis of the rotation (size). ”Self Righting" is a great idea by Traxxas, but it should only be used on their smaller and lighter RC vehicles.

    Quote Originally Posted by RJUK View Post
    Would love to know the reason why it's bad, just to get my head around it. Also, does that mean wheelies are bad for the front diff?
    To answer your other question RJ, anytime you have a RC vehicle start out, stop, change speed, and change direction you're going to put stress on its' drive train...it's unavoidable. This is especially true with larger RC vehicles, but this is normal operation, and the reason why maintenance and inspections are necessary.

    These guys aren't telling you to not have fun with your Xmaxx by bashing it around. They're telling you that you loose more than you gain by using "Self Righting" with a truck the size of an Xmaxx, and that it's much better (in the long run) to just flip it back over yourself than to unnecessarily put it through all that drivetrain stress (when you really don't have to) in order to have fun.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 11-22-2020 at 07:20 AM.
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  6. #6
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    Nice reply, RG. Maybe self righting is for that emergency situation only (like other side of the stream bed, etc)

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies guys. I didn't really know what it does (don't have an X-maxx yet) but yes, if it's going from full throttle in one direction to full throttle immediately in the other then that doesn't sound great.

    Does the Xmaxxx need any upgrades straight away in the drivetrain? I saw a YT video that mentioned the pinion and maybe spur gears were pretty weak?

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  8. #8
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    i think what everyone is saying is true. if i just think about the amount of back and forth violence required from a 1 inch pinion in order to flip over a 25lb truck it makes me feel bad for those gears.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    This is very true, due to the repeated overcoming of the forces of inertia during the "Self Righting" process, but the size and weight of the Xmaxx is another factor to be considered too.

    Remember, inertia is the “sum of the product of mass” of each particle with the “square of its distance from the axis of the rotation (size). ”Self Righting" is a great idea by Traxxas, but it should only be used on their smaller and lighter RC vehicles.



    To answer your other question RJ, anytime you have a RC vehicle start out, stop, change speed, and change direction you're going to put stress on its' drive train...it's unavoidable. This is especially true with larger RC vehicles, but this is normal operation, and the reason why maintenance and inspections are necessary.

    These guys aren't telling you to not have fun with your Xmaxx by bashing it around. They're telling you that you loose more than you gain by using "Self Righting" with a truck the size of an Xmaxx, and that it's much better (in the long run) to just flip it back over yourself than to unnecessarily put it through all that drivetrain stress (when you really don't have to) in order to have fun.
    Totally agree with you, I prefer don't use the Self Righting feature with the X-Maxx, is a massive truck for this feature.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by varunaX View Post
    i think what everyone is saying is true. if i just think about the amount of back and forth violence required from a 1 inch pinion in order to flip over a 25lb truck it makes me feel bad for those gears.
    Sure, but think about that same pinion when you're landing a jump, or doing a backflip in the air...

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  11. #11
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. Squeegie's Avatar
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    When landing a jump, you are supposed to let go of the throttle. You should not land while on the throttle.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squeegie View Post
    When landing a jump, you are supposed to let go of the throttle. You should not land while on the throttle.
    Sure, but the whole drivetrain is still connected to the wheels when you land, right? Or is there some sort of viscous coupling that absorbs the shock?

    I must admit I was wondering what the "cush drive" is, so that's on my list to research today.

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  13. #13
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. ReglarGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJUK View Post
    Sure, but think about that same pinion when you're landing a jump, or doing a backflip in the air...
    Yes, but jumping, landing, flipping, and slamming on the throttle are all a part of the normal bashing experience, but Self Righting is just a convenience. To have fun, bashing or racing is necessary. To have fun, Self Righting is not. So logically, to get the most out of your drive train, you want to avoid the unnecessary drive train stressful things, and only do the necessary drive train stressful things that are for having fun.

    I can only tell you that if Commander Spock had a Xmaxx, he would not use Self Righting. It would be illogical, if his goal was to have the most fun with the least amount of cost and maintenance...peace and prosperity.
    Last edited by ReglarGuy; 11-24-2020 at 05:29 AM.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReglarGuy View Post
    Yes, but jumping, landing, flipping, and slamming on the throttle are all a part of the normal bashing experience, but Self Righting is just a convenience. To have fun, bashing or racing is necessary. To have fun, Self Righting is not. So logically, to get the most out of your drive train, you want to avoid the unnecessary drive train stressful things, and only do the necessary drive train stressful things that are for having fun.

    I can only tell you that if Commander Spock had a Xmaxx, he would not use Self Righting. It would be illogical, if his goal was to have the most fun with the least amount of cost and maintenance...peace and prosperity.
    Now you have me imagining Spock driving an X-Maxx...

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  15. #15
    RC Turnbuckle Jr. ReglarGuy's Avatar
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    I'm sure that you would agree that he'd love it, but I think we both know he'd never admit it to Bones.
    Life's to short to be a sour puss.

  16. #16
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    I used to race my RC's at the state level. Many times the turnmarshalls do not see your RC upside down in the race.... So I picked up a few tricks from others. What we would do is blips the throttle a bit smack on the brakes and turn the front wheels while repeating the throttle brake thing.... It worked well. Not quite as hard on the drivetrain as this self righting thing but yeah I could see going from forward to reverse being pretty hard on everything..... Maybe try this method, it's a bit easier on the parts.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJUK View Post
    Sure, but the whole drivetrain is still connected to the wheels when you land, right? Or is there some sort of viscous coupling that absorbs the shock?

    I must admit I was wondering what the "cush drive" is, so that's on my list to research today.

    Sent from my LYA-L09 using Tapatalk
    On a jump all parts are moving in the same direction - albeit different speeds - but there is something to give within the drive train to absorb it. With self-righting you are taking a motor and wheels going near full speed in one direction then the motor suddenly reversing the direction. More often than not the diff is going to fail.

    Similar to getting a car/truck stuck in the snow. Some people say to "rock" it out by putting it in drive, giving gas and then into reverse and give it gas. There are other ways to do it that saves extreme wear and tear on the transmission.
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  18. #18
    My stampede 2wd can self right, and when I had plastic driveshafts in it, they used to pop out when self righting. They ended up getting very stretched and messed up over time.
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  19. #19
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    Sure, but from what I hear the truck goes full throttle forwards, then uses the brakes to stop the wheels, then does full throttle in reverse, right. So being that the wheels are in the air there's very little load on the drivetrain in terms of it's not moving the weight of the truck, just the wheels and tyres. So it's no different from driving forwards flat out, slowing to a stop with the brakes, then going in reverse at full speed, surely? And you wouldn't expect that to strip your gears that quickly.

    Whilst I suspect I'll avoid using it from the standpoint of causing unecessary wear on the drivetrain, I do question if it actually causes accelerated failure. I mean, have loads of people been having X-Maxxes shattering diffs after using it?

    Would be interesting for somebody to torture test it to see how many times you can self right before damaging the drivetrain. I imagine you'd cause more damage to the body shell!

    Maybe it's something I could try to put forward to Kevin Talbot, as he seems to like torturing his X-Maxxes. I suspect he could run a good few packs through it of just self righting and the drivetrain would still be going strong... Might make for a boring video!

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  20. #20
    RC Champion grizzly03's Avatar
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    I'm not sure where/why this self-righting is being explained as going in one direction then going in the opposite direction. Mine goes in one direction and then brakes hard, then repeat until it on its wheels. It just brakes harder (in self-righting) than when using the brakes when driving.



    Mine works how Nitronaught is explaining he has done it manually without having that feature built in.
    Last edited by grizzly03; 11-24-2020 at 12:19 PM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by grizzly03 View Post
    I'm not sure where/why this self-righting is being explained as going in one direction then going in the opposite direction. Mine goes in one direction and then brakes hard, then repeat until it on its wheels. It just brakes harder (in self-righting) than when using the brakes when driving.



    Mine works how Nitronaught is explaining he has done it manually without having that feature built in.
    Interesting. It's a cool looking feature, for sure.

    I also wonder if you upgraded the pinion and spur gears to stronger ones whether there would be any issue with using it at all, or is it the diffs people are worried about?

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  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by grizzly03 View Post
    I'm not sure where/why this self-righting is being explained as going in one direction then going in the opposite direction. Mine goes in one direction and then brakes hard, then repeat until it on its wheels. It just brakes harder (in self-righting) than when using the brakes when driving.



    Mine works how Nitronaught is explaining he has done it manually without having that feature built in.
    What you are saying is exactly how it is done. It does not go in reverse. Just brakes. The way the X-maxx does it is how I do it with my stampede 2wd.
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  23. #23
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    There were some early reports of XMaxxs breaking diff gears with the self righting mechanism. I was only running 6S at the time so it never really worked for me.


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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmarzke View Post
    There were some early reports of XMaxxs breaking diff gears with the self righting mechanism. I was only running 6S at the time so it never really worked for me.


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    Presumably the drivetrain was upgraded from 6s to 8s though?

    Even then, I'd have thought that rotating the relatively small mass of the wheels would put less strain on the gears than moving the whole truck about at speed and doing jumps and flips etc?

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJUK View Post
    Presumably the drivetrain was upgraded from 6s to 8s though?

    Even then, I'd have thought that rotating the relatively small mass of the wheels would put less strain on the gears than moving the whole truck about at speed and doing jumps and flips etc?

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    The 8S version drivetrain is harder than 6S version, the diffs too.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmacine View Post
    The 8S version drivetrain is harder than 6S version, the diffs too.
    Larger, beefier, more substantial.
    The reason not to use self righting is that it breaks things, it has, it does.
    If you choose to use it, just be warned.


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  27. #27
    RC Qualifier Flux Capacitor's Avatar
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    To further add to this complex issue about the self-righting feature having its toll on drive train components, one has to look at the intended purpose of what the center differential was all about.

    Traxxas introduced the center differential on the 8S models to replace the slipper that was originally provided on the 6S trucks supposedly to reduce drive train stress.

    If we look at this from a standpoint of what a differential was intended to do rather than what a differential is doing in the center position of a drive train during self-righting, it becomes obvious that resistance and counter-resistance is treated differently when there is no traction to any one given wheel. Point in case, if it wasn't a problem, then why was a Cush Drive also necessary? I'll get to that later in this post.

    Differentials were intended to compensate for opposing wheel speeds to each tire independently if more resistance was met by one of the wheels. To clarify, try running a differential locker in your front differential position and it will become very obvious very quickly that the front wheels rotating at exactly the same speed will widen your turning radius dramatically.

    With that in mind, the only resistance being met by any wheel when the vehicle is upside-down, is the wheel inertia/resistance itself. Differentials were intended to work when separate wheels were receiving varying degrees of rolling speed/resistance, not when all wheels were free from any type of normal resistance whatsoever. In other words, the ground.

    Now add to all of this the fact that a center differential has to compensate for different feedback results from the front and rear of the truck along with the current direction of the motor at any given time, it then becomes very obvious why that Cush Drive was introduce into the spur internals.

    I could get even more in depth as to why I believe a center differential is counter-productive as opposed to already having two other differentials in the truck; but it would get into an extensive debate about personal preference and what you are actually doing with the truck and how you use it. Does the center differential work? Yes, absolutely it does (when the truck is upright); but when the truck is upside-down, that center differential is just dead weight counter-rotating against the mass feedback from the other two differentials and really serving no purpose when the truck is off its tires other than to receive feedback from the motor direction.

    If climbing hills, I found that a center HR locker is nice to have installed as it makes sure the output to the front and rear wheels is the same. I made the mistake of installing the rear differential locker at the same time and wondered why I couldn't whip the rear end of my truck around through corners like I use to when a rear differential was present.

    I pointed out my case for this by installing a locker in the front differential position as an experiment to see what would happen and I can assure you that turning becomes a whole different animal!

    If you don't like turning in other words, just go ahead and install a locker in the front differential position and enjoy such wide turning arcs that you'll actually believe you are riding one of those raked out choppers where the front wheel is so far away from the frame that you have to plan your turns a 1/4 mile before you even get to the turn itself.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    To further add to this complex issue about the self-righting feature having its toll on drive train components, one has to look at the intended purpose of what the center differential was all about.

    Traxxas introduced the center differential on the 8S models to replace the slipper that was originally provided on the 6S trucks supposedly to reduce drive train stress.

    If we look at this from a standpoint of what a differential was intended to do rather than what a differential is doing in the center position of a drive train during self-righting, it becomes obvious that resistance and counter-resistance is treated differently when there is no traction to any one given wheel. Point in case, if it wasn't a problem, then why was a Cush Drive also necessary? I'll get to that later in this post.

    Differentials were intended to compensate for opposing wheel speeds to each tire independently if more resistance was met by one of the wheels. To clarify, try running a differential locker in your front differential position and it will become very obvious very quickly that the front wheels rotating at exactly the same speed will widen your turning radius dramatically.

    With that in mind, the only resistance being met by any wheel when the vehicle is upside-down, is the wheel inertia/resistance itself. Differentials were intended to work when separate wheels were receiving varying degrees of rolling speed/resistance, not when all wheels were free from any type of normal resistance whatsoever. In other words, the ground.

    Now add to all of this the fact that a center differential has to compensate for different feedback results from the front and rear of the truck along with the current direction of the motor at any given time, it then becomes very obvious why that Cush Drive was introduce into the spur internals.

    I could get even more in depth as to why I believe a center differential is counter-productive as opposed to already having two other differentials in the truck; but it would get into an extensive debate about personal preference and what you are actually doing with the truck and how you use it. Does the center differential work? Yes, absolutely it does (when the truck is upright); but when the truck is upside-down, that center differential is just dead weight counter-rotating against the mass feedback from the other two differentials and really serving no purpose when the truck is off its tires other than to receive feedback from the motor direction.

    If climbing hills, I found that a center HR locker is nice to have installed as it makes sure the output to the front and rear wheels is the same. I made the mistake of installing the rear differential locker at the same time and wondered why I couldn't whip the rear end of my truck around through corners like I use to when a rear differential was present.

    I pointed out my case for this by installing a locker in the front differential position as an experiment to see what would happen and I can assure you that turning becomes a whole different animal!

    If you don't like turning in other words, just go ahead and install a locker in the front differential position and enjoy such wide turning arcs that you'll actually believe you are riding one of those raked out choppers where the front wheel is so far away from the frame that you have to plan your turns a 1/4 mile before you even get to the turn itself.
    Mate, Ņdo you mean put a locker in the center and in the front diffs?

  29. #29
    RC Qualifier Flux Capacitor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmacine View Post
    Mate, Ņdo you mean put a locker in the center and in the front diffs?
    Only if you like not being able to turn sharply. I was using it as an example to amplify how important it is to have a differential in the front because the inside wheel on the turn has to rotate at a different speed than the outside wheel in order to have a good steering response. A differential allows this and a locker does not.

    I was making an obligated reference as to what would happen if you put a locker in the front; not to imply one should do it.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 11-25-2020 at 03:50 AM. Reason: Updated.
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  30. #30
    RC Qualifier Flux Capacitor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Traxxas introduced the center differential on the 8S models to replace the slipper that was originally provided on the 6S trucks supposedly to reduce drive train stress.
    A correction is needed here.

    I meant to type: Traxxas introduced the Cush Drive on the 8S models to replace the slipper that was originally provided on the 6S trucks supposedly to reduce drive train stress.

    However, it was correct to state that the introduction of the center differential (Torque-Biasing Center Drive) didn't come about until the 8S models were released. There was just an output gear: part #7784 on the 6S models that was upgraded to part #7796 on the 8S models.
    Last edited by Flux Capacitor; 11-25-2020 at 11:20 AM. Reason: Correction.
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  31. #31
    RC Turnbuckle Jr.
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    We can analyze every aspect of the truck. Flux. Your answer is more in-depth than mine. At the end of the day, if
    You use self righting youíll break your truck.


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  32. #32
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    i don't use it but i'm usually not far from the truck so i can walk over to it and use my foot to put it back on all four. i mean i'm not that lazy and it's usually only 25-50 feet i have to walk.

  33. #33
    RC Racer GTSDart340's Avatar
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    Full speed tire+stationary ground =broken parts

    Rustler 4x4 VXL

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    Only if you like not being able to turn sharply. I was using it as an example to amplify how important it is to have a differential in the front because the inside wheel on the turn has to rotate at a different speed than the outside wheel in order to have a good steering response. A differential allows this and a locker does not.

    I was making an obligated reference as to what would happen if you put a locker in the front; not to imply one should do it.
    I understand, mate, thanks, I ordered three of these lockers as a spares or for change any of the diffs of my truck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    A correction is needed here.

    I meant to type: Traxxas introduced the Cush Drive on the 8S models to replace the slipper that was originally provided on the 6S trucks supposedly to reduce drive train stress.

    However, it was correct to state that the introduction of the center differential (Torque-Biasing Center Drive) didn't come about until the 8S models were released. There was just an output gear: part #7784 on the 6S models that was upgraded to part #7796 on the 8S models.
    This is correct.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTSDart340 View Post
    Full speed tire+stationary ground =broken parts

    Rustler 4x4 VXL
    Agree with this.

  36. #36
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    I never use the Self Righting feature, because walk with your RC is healthy.


  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juanmacine View Post
    I never use the Self Righting feature, because walk with your RC is healthy.

    That's what my boss told me when he moved the printer from my desk to the other side of the room.

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJUK View Post
    That's what my boss told me when he moved the printer from my desk to the other side of the room.

    Sent from my LYA-L09 using Tapatalk
    Hahahahaha,

  39. #39
    RC Qualifier Flux Capacitor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gripdog7205 View Post
    We can analyze every aspect of the truck. Flux. Your answer is more in-depth than mine. At the end of the day, if
    You use self righting youíll break your truck.


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    I hear you Gripdog!

    I never meant to imply that any answer here was insufficient to any extent. I have a tendency to overstate why I believe parts are breaking on this truck as a venting measure versus throwing the thing at the wall sometimes.

    I believe your simple answers are more quick to the draw than my ramblings and by all means, yes; at the end of the day, if one chooses to use self-righting on a regular basis, one can expect a broken truck. I just hate the part that I know why parts are breaking and not being able to always fix it with a better solution.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flux Capacitor View Post
    I hear you Gripdog!

    I never meant to imply that any answer here was insufficient to any extent. I have a tendency to overstate why I believe parts are breaking on this truck as a venting measure versus throwing the thing at the wall sometimes.

    I believe your simple answers are more quick to the draw than my ramblings and by all means, yes; at the end of the day, if one chooses to use self-righting on a regular basis, one can expect a broken truck. I just hate the part that I know why parts are breaking and not being able to always fix it with a better solution.
    I didnít take it any way but how you meant it. I enjoy reading your well thought out answers. At the end of the day, the topic is why itís bad. We are both right on this one. My answer is correct because of the details you listed.


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