Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Rear camber

  1. #1
    RC Racer GTSDart340's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    184

    Rear camber

    I'm adjusting the rear suspension on my Rustler. What do you recommend for the rear camber? Should the wheels be perpendicular to the ground, or a slight angle in or out? The truck is used for general bashing, no racing. Very little asphalt, mostly dirt/grass, the occasional basketball court for dounuts. Thanks for the advice!

    Rustler 4x4 VXL

  2. #2
    RC Racer
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    134
    Quote Originally Posted by GTSDart340 View Post
    I'm adjusting the rear suspension on my Rustler. What do you recommend for the rear camber? Should the wheels be perpendicular to the ground, or a slight angle in or out? The truck is used for general bashing, no racing. Very little asphalt, mostly dirt/grass, the occasional basketball court for dounuts. Thanks for the advice!

    Rustler 4x4 VXL
    So, this does not necessarily pertain to 1:1 average joe cars...but IMO, from playing/experimenting with my own R4stler vxl...i have found stability and ease of turning at significant speeds is aided by adding POSITIVE, (top of tire pointed away from car) camber of .5 up to 2 degrees(Estimated)- does wonders, and also helps to rid of that awful inner-edge-treadwear caused by excess camber under load (accelerating & turning while on throttle, etc).

    Take your rustler, adjust the camber and other alignment angles till you look straight down on the car while it's on the ground at ride height, and the front tires point straight ahead and the rear tires are straight up and down with their factory induced rear toe angles. Now pick up the car drop it from 6" to 8" off the ground, then (without applying any weight downwards on the vehicle only pushing forward and rearward) roll the chassis forward let's say 6 in to 1.5 feet, then roll it back to you in the same manner.

    Now, gently press down in the middle of the rear shock tower call it, half-squish the suspension... keep your eye on the rear tires how they actually gain negative camber under load meaning they lean in towards the car... Do it again but roll the car forward with a slight load applied, try pressing down on the rear shock tower with one hand won't slowly rolling forward and applying realistic as you can wait to the right front shock tower as far right as you can go simulating a high speed left hand sweeper turn, where the weight is thrown to the right and see what you lose and gain between left and right rear tires. this visual demonstration surely helped me get an idea of where my rear camber needed to be for my driving style.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •