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  1. #1
    RC Racer SpeedieGonzales's Avatar
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    Aluminum rear skid plate

    So, during the rebuild thread, when taking off the rear bumper set screws... the wrench had to snap into place... because the metal was extruded backwards. So I have these two pieces of rectangular aluminum stock, and I just want to know the best way to mount them; one is about 7 mm thick, and hollow (1 mm aluminum, 5 mm space, ofc with walls and then another 1mm) and 19mm wide (might be off, not a perfect tool) the other one is just 19mm wide and 4.5mm thick (and both are ridiculously long, longer than my truck.) I have the tools to cut it, what's the best way to mount it? I think maybe the hollow one, because it will take the longest to get through, and just use those rear countersunk screws to hold it in place, but i'm worried I might just rip them out of the chassis. My slash is set really high, because j u m p, so I'm not worried about ground clearance. What do you guys think? Solid, and (mounted how?), or hollow, using countersunk screws. I feel like once the top layer of the hollow one is eaten up, it wil disappear quickly. Idk if i'll get sparks, but that's not the main goal. Ik aluminum isn't great as sparking, but it's a pretty hard alloy.
    Last edited by cooleocool; 12-05-2020 at 02:26 AM. Reason: user request, corrected post
    Florida Man cares not from whence the speed comes

  2. #2
    RC Qualifier RCWilly's Avatar
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    I think using the hollow one would be better in terms of weight. Having a big block of metal in the back will definitely mess with the center of mass of the truck, and increasing the mass would also increase the force of impact. A few questions though, how often do you bottom out, and how high do you usually go? 7mm is pretty thick, so if you do bottom out, there's going to be less distance for the shocks to absorb all the kinetic energy before hitting the car. For sparks, probably not. Aluminum has a higher heat capacity and is also more malleable compared to steel or titanium. For the screws, how would you make the countersunk screws fit (dremel tool or something?)?
    Everyday's a gift, thus now is called the present.

  3. #3
    RC Racer SpeedieGonzales's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCWilly View Post
    I think using the hollow one would be better in terms of weight. Having a big block of metal in the back will definitely mess with the center of mass of the truck, and increasing the mass would also increase the force of impact. A few questions though, how often do you bottom out, and how high do you usually go? 7mm is pretty thick, so if you do bottom out, there's going to be less distance for the shocks to absorb all the kinetic energy before hitting the car. For sparks, probably not. Aluminum has a higher heat capacity and is also more malleable compared to steel or titanium. For the screws, how would you make the countersunk screws fit (dremel tool or something?)?
    It's not really a big block... keep in mind the hollow one is twice as thick. same width. The solid one IS heaver with a shorter rod, but it won't add more than a couple ounces.

    I don't go STUPID high, but I yeet it at least 5ft (Maybe up to 10) once a run (At the skatepark ofc, not during my suburb bashing which is the usual, at most like 2-3.5 ft jumps) I̶ ̶h̶a̶v̶e̶ my dad has a dremel tool, but it's a bit big, so I'll have to be careful, so I can make countersinks.
    Last edited by cooleocool; 12-05-2020 at 02:27 AM. Reason: user request
    Florida Man cares not from whence the speed comes

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