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  1. #1
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    How to take care of trx4/6 in water?

    I'm wanting to start running my trx6 through fairly deep water, and I am aware that this will almost certainly kill the stock motor, and I'm ok with that. I have disassembled and more heavily greased the diffs, portals, and the transmission to protect them from rust. After running I remove the tires and wd40 basically every visible metal part on the truck. Is there anything else I should be doing? What should I do with the tires since they have water in them now? I saw some places saying to cap the breather holes, where others said to add vents?

  2. #2
    RC Champion RCWilly's Avatar
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    Closing the vent holes on the wheels reduce the amount of water going into the foams, but doesn't do anything to remove the water already inside the foams. Adding vents on the outside of the tire can remove some of the water when spinning it.
    Everyday's a gift, thus now is called the present.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCWilly View Post
    Closing the vent holes on the wheels reduce the amount of water going into the foams, but doesn't do anything to remove the water already inside the foams. Adding vents on the outside of the tire can remove some of the water when spinning it.
    So close the holes and make vents then?

  4. #4
    RC Champion RCWilly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimJones123 View Post
    So close the holes and make vents then?
    You don't need to close the holes on the wheels since water can still get to the foam from the vents on the tires. The vents on the tires are meant to remove the water (if they are glued to the rims).

    If you have beadlocks, you can just disassemble it and remove the foam to dry, reassemble it when the foam is dry and cover up the vent holes when you go in the water.
    Everyday's a gift, thus now is called the present.

  5. #5
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    really just make a habit of taking everything apart and greasing and reassembling stuffing the front axle tubes helps a ton with water just rolling into the front diff

  6. #6
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    I run my crawlers in water alot, for many years now. I removed the seals on every bearing everywhere, and packed them with marine grease, reinstall the seals, and coat the outside with marine grease. Internal axle shafts, transmission shafts, any metal inside plastic, gets coated with marine grease. Then I pack everything that can fill with water, with marine grease (axle tubes, transmission). You need to use marine grease, not red n tacky, not whatever it comes with, or whatever anyone recommends. Marine grease.
    Definitely seal the vent holes in the rims and vent the tires. Centrifugal force will force water into the foams through the rims. Seal it. Aslong as the tires are spinning, you'll barely have any water come in through a hole in the tire.
    For cleaning, I just hose em down hard, blow off most of the water with an air compressor, run the truck upside-down to remove the water from the tires, and then a light mist of silicone spray. Next day it looks brand new again (besides the broken parts...) I used to tear down my rigs every 3 months to clean and regrease, but inside was fine after 3 months. So I tried 6, still ok. Now I do it maybe once a year, if I happen to remember. My bearings last for years, some are probably 6 or 7 years old and still work great.
    Now electronics are another story. Don't expect "waterproof" electronics to last. They need attention to.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    I use wheel bearing and brake drum grease I got at ace its crazy sticky seems to do better than marine grease its real cheap to for a pail of it

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris5100 View Post
    I use wheel bearing and brake drum grease I got at ace its crazy sticky seems to do better than marine grease its real cheap to for a pail of it
    I've been running some crappy wheel bearing grease and it seems to work well.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCWilly View Post
    You don't need to close the holes on the wheels since water can still get to the foam from the vents on the tires. The vents on the tires are meant to remove the water (if they are glued to the rims).

    If you have beadlocks, you can just disassemble it and remove the foam to dry, reassemble it when the foam is dry and cover up the vent holes when you go in the water.
    I still have the stock tires, havent messed with them much, but I dont think they're beadlocks right? I'll have to go look tonight.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve g View Post
    I run my crawlers in water alot, for many years now. I removed the seals on every bearing everywhere, and packed them with marine grease, reinstall the seals, and coat the outside with marine grease. Internal axle shafts, transmission shafts, any metal inside plastic, gets coated with marine grease. Then I pack everything that can fill with water, with marine grease (axle tubes, transmission). You need to use marine grease, not red n tacky, not whatever it comes with, or whatever anyone recommends. Marine grease.
    Definitely seal the vent holes in the rims and vent the tires. Centrifugal force will force water into the foams through the rims. Seal it. Aslong as the tires are spinning, you'll barely have any water come in through a hole in the tire.
    For cleaning, I just hose em down hard, blow off most of the water with an air compressor, run the truck upside-down to remove the water from the tires, and then a light mist of silicone spray. Next day it looks brand new again (besides the broken parts...) I used to tear down my rigs every 3 months to clean and regrease, but inside was fine after 3 months. So I tried 6, still ok. Now I do it maybe once a year, if I happen to remember. My bearings last for years, some are probably 6 or 7 years old and still work great.
    Now electronics are another story. Don't expect "waterproof" electronics to last. They need attention to.

    Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
    Hmm ok, sounds pretty similar to what I'm doing so far, but I need to disassemble everything again and grease the inside of the bearings, rather than just doing the outside which is all I did so far. I'll do what you recommended with the tires as long as it doesnt have any negative effects such as making them more prone to tearing on rocks since I do still crawl with it a lot, water is more occasional, but when I do I like to totally sink it lol.

  11. #11
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    Best way I’ve found to vent tyres is heat up a nail red hot with a blowtorch and then melt two holes in the tyre in gaps between treads on opposite sides. It makes a small neat hole and avoids leaving any start point for a tear to grow from. Never had issues with tearing on crawler or basher. There is a wee bit of smoke from melting rubber, but I just hold my breath until it blows away.

  12. #12
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    DouglasD,
    That is a great idea.
    Thanks.

  13. #13
    Marine grease is optimized to direct water exposure and high shear environment of prop shaft tunnels. Bearing grease is more generally optimized for a ball bearing in a housing. I am generalizing but that's what one is paying for with marine grease (the simple variety hobbyists uses, there are dozens & dozens, and dozens more, grades of marine grease, much less grease).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeOvercoat View Post
    Marine grease is optimized to direct water exposure and high shear environment of prop shaft tunnels. Bearing grease is more generally optimized for a ball bearing in a housing. I am generalizing but that's what one is paying for with marine grease (the simple variety hobbyists uses, there are dozens & dozens, and dozens more, grades of marine grease, much less grease).
    Hmm, I may invest in some marine grease for my new trx6. I just got another one ****.

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